ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
CANCER
Yoga Eases Sleep Problems Among Cancer Survivors
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
CAREGIVING
Are Hospital Mobile Phones Dialing Up Superbugs?
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
DIET, NUTRITION
Oregano Shown to be the Most Powerful Culinary Herb
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
5 Reasons why you could gain weight while dieting
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Hairspray Exposure Ups Risk for Birth Defect in Sons
Gene Explains How High-Fructose Diets Lead to Insulin Resistance
Lead Exposure in Childhood Linked to Criminal Behavior Later
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
FITNESS
Basketball Star Details His Struggle With Gout
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Keep Fire Safety in Mind as You Celebrate
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
Ginkgo Won't Prevent Heart Attack, Stroke in Elderly
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
When It Comes to Toys, Shop Smart, Shop Safe
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
SENIORS
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
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Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches

WEDNESDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- For most children who suffer from chronic daily headaches in their early teens, a new study has good news -- about 88 percent will outgrow them before their early 20s.

For the remaining 12 percent, however, those headaches may persist into adulthood. And, the study, published in the July 15 online issue of Neurology, found that teens who experienced migraines were more likely to continue having headaches as they got older.

"This long-term community-based study found that, after eight years of follow-up, chronic daily headache in adolescents is not a protracted disorder. Even though many patients still had headache, most subjects did not have chronic daily headaches at the latest follow-up," said study author Dr. Shuu-Jiun Wang, section chief of the neurological institute at Taipei Veterans General Hospital in Taiwan.

As many as 4 percent of American adults and 1 percent to 2 percent of middle-school children experience chronic daily headaches, according to an editorial in the same issue of the journal. To be classified as a chronic daily headache sufferer, the person must have headaches more than 15 days each month for more than three months, according to background information in the study. Generally, these headaches last for more than four hours a day, and cause considerable disability.

The new research included 122 Taiwanese teens between the ages of 12 and 14 at the start of the study. All reported chronic daily headaches. Nearly two-thirds experienced a tension-type headache, while the other third had chronic migraines.

At the eight-year follow-up point, 103 of the volunteers completed the study. Twenty-six were male, and the average age at the end of the study was 21.6 years old.

Just 12 percent were still having chronic daily headaches after eight years. Eighty-three percent of those still having headaches were migraine sufferers, according to the study.

Other factors associated with continuing headache included medication overuse (which can cause "rebound headaches"), an onset of headaches before the age of 13, and a duration of daily headaches that lasted longer than two years, the study said.

"The exact reason [the headaches stopped for most] is unknown based on this observational study. We believe that this is the nature of chronic daily headache in adolescents as they grow into young adults," Wang said.

Dr. Amy Goldstein, a pediatric neurologist at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, said the new study "shows that if your child is having chronic daily headaches, even without major intervention, the majority will get better. It may be a difficult year to get through, and for a lot of my patients, they feel like the headache pain is never going to go away, but the message here is that it can get better over time, so continue working with your physician."

If you or your child are experiencing daily headaches, Goldstein said that one of the most helpful things you can do is to keep a headache diary so you and your doctor can pinpoint potential headache triggers that you may need to avoid.

Also, she said, you need to be careful about over-the-counter pain medication use, because while they can initially be helpful, they can cause rebound headaches when used long term. If medications -- prescription or over-the-counter -- don't help, some alternative medicine therapies may be useful, such as massage, acupuncture or biofeedback.

In some cases, people with chronic headaches can benefit from counseling if the headaches stem from stress or anxiety, Goldstein said.

SOURCES: Shuu-Jiun Wang, M.D., section chief, neurology, the Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, and professor, department of neurology, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan; Amy Goldstein, M.D., pediatric neurologist, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh; July 15, 2009, Neurology, online