ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Extra Pounds in Mid-Life Affect Later Mobility
CANCER
Immune Therapy May Aid Kids With Neuroblastoma
Multiple Screening Strategy Boosts Cervical Cancer Detection
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
CAREGIVING
Mom's Smoking May Lead to SIDS
Children's Bath Products Contain Contaminants
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Health Tip: After Liposuction
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
DIABETES
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
B Vitamins Might Lower Stroke Risk
Holiday Eating Without the Guilt -- or the Pounds
Blueberry Drink Protects Mice From Obesity, Diabetes
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Agent Orange Exposure Tied to Prostate Cancer Return
Greenhouse Gases Hazardous to Your Health
Sunken, Unexploded Bombs Pose Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
FITNESS
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Heavy Alcohol Use Linked to Cancer
Week of Historic Senate Hearings on Integrative Medicine May Open New Doors
Vitamin D Best Taken With Largest Meal of Day, Study Finds
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Cherry-Enriched Diet Cut Heart Risks in Rats
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Countdown to Hair Loss
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
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Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches

WEDNESDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- For most children who suffer from chronic daily headaches in their early teens, a new study has good news -- about 88 percent will outgrow them before their early 20s.

For the remaining 12 percent, however, those headaches may persist into adulthood. And, the study, published in the July 15 online issue of Neurology, found that teens who experienced migraines were more likely to continue having headaches as they got older.

"This long-term community-based study found that, after eight years of follow-up, chronic daily headache in adolescents is not a protracted disorder. Even though many patients still had headache, most subjects did not have chronic daily headaches at the latest follow-up," said study author Dr. Shuu-Jiun Wang, section chief of the neurological institute at Taipei Veterans General Hospital in Taiwan.

As many as 4 percent of American adults and 1 percent to 2 percent of middle-school children experience chronic daily headaches, according to an editorial in the same issue of the journal. To be classified as a chronic daily headache sufferer, the person must have headaches more than 15 days each month for more than three months, according to background information in the study. Generally, these headaches last for more than four hours a day, and cause considerable disability.

The new research included 122 Taiwanese teens between the ages of 12 and 14 at the start of the study. All reported chronic daily headaches. Nearly two-thirds experienced a tension-type headache, while the other third had chronic migraines.

At the eight-year follow-up point, 103 of the volunteers completed the study. Twenty-six were male, and the average age at the end of the study was 21.6 years old.

Just 12 percent were still having chronic daily headaches after eight years. Eighty-three percent of those still having headaches were migraine sufferers, according to the study.

Other factors associated with continuing headache included medication overuse (which can cause "rebound headaches"), an onset of headaches before the age of 13, and a duration of daily headaches that lasted longer than two years, the study said.

"The exact reason [the headaches stopped for most] is unknown based on this observational study. We believe that this is the nature of chronic daily headache in adolescents as they grow into young adults," Wang said.

Dr. Amy Goldstein, a pediatric neurologist at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, said the new study "shows that if your child is having chronic daily headaches, even without major intervention, the majority will get better. It may be a difficult year to get through, and for a lot of my patients, they feel like the headache pain is never going to go away, but the message here is that it can get better over time, so continue working with your physician."

If you or your child are experiencing daily headaches, Goldstein said that one of the most helpful things you can do is to keep a headache diary so you and your doctor can pinpoint potential headache triggers that you may need to avoid.

Also, she said, you need to be careful about over-the-counter pain medication use, because while they can initially be helpful, they can cause rebound headaches when used long term. If medications -- prescription or over-the-counter -- don't help, some alternative medicine therapies may be useful, such as massage, acupuncture or biofeedback.

In some cases, people with chronic headaches can benefit from counseling if the headaches stem from stress or anxiety, Goldstein said.

SOURCES: Shuu-Jiun Wang, M.D., section chief, neurology, the Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, and professor, department of neurology, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan; Amy Goldstein, M.D., pediatric neurologist, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh; July 15, 2009, Neurology, online