ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
CANCER
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
CAREGIVING
Omega-3 Fatty Acid May Help 'Preemie' Girls' Brains
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Smog Tougher on the Obese
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
DIABETES
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
DIET, NUTRITION
Trans Fat Labeling Gets Tricky
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Old-Growth Forests Dying Off in U.S. West
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
EYE CARE, VISION
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
FITNESS
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Workplace Wellness Seems to Really Work
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Cherry-Enriched Diet Cut Heart Risks in Rats
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Treat Kids to a Safe Halloween
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
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Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches

WEDNESDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- For most children who suffer from chronic daily headaches in their early teens, a new study has good news -- about 88 percent will outgrow them before their early 20s.

For the remaining 12 percent, however, those headaches may persist into adulthood. And, the study, published in the July 15 online issue of Neurology, found that teens who experienced migraines were more likely to continue having headaches as they got older.

"This long-term community-based study found that, after eight years of follow-up, chronic daily headache in adolescents is not a protracted disorder. Even though many patients still had headache, most subjects did not have chronic daily headaches at the latest follow-up," said study author Dr. Shuu-Jiun Wang, section chief of the neurological institute at Taipei Veterans General Hospital in Taiwan.

As many as 4 percent of American adults and 1 percent to 2 percent of middle-school children experience chronic daily headaches, according to an editorial in the same issue of the journal. To be classified as a chronic daily headache sufferer, the person must have headaches more than 15 days each month for more than three months, according to background information in the study. Generally, these headaches last for more than four hours a day, and cause considerable disability.

The new research included 122 Taiwanese teens between the ages of 12 and 14 at the start of the study. All reported chronic daily headaches. Nearly two-thirds experienced a tension-type headache, while the other third had chronic migraines.

At the eight-year follow-up point, 103 of the volunteers completed the study. Twenty-six were male, and the average age at the end of the study was 21.6 years old.

Just 12 percent were still having chronic daily headaches after eight years. Eighty-three percent of those still having headaches were migraine sufferers, according to the study.

Other factors associated with continuing headache included medication overuse (which can cause "rebound headaches"), an onset of headaches before the age of 13, and a duration of daily headaches that lasted longer than two years, the study said.

"The exact reason [the headaches stopped for most] is unknown based on this observational study. We believe that this is the nature of chronic daily headache in adolescents as they grow into young adults," Wang said.

Dr. Amy Goldstein, a pediatric neurologist at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, said the new study "shows that if your child is having chronic daily headaches, even without major intervention, the majority will get better. It may be a difficult year to get through, and for a lot of my patients, they feel like the headache pain is never going to go away, but the message here is that it can get better over time, so continue working with your physician."

If you or your child are experiencing daily headaches, Goldstein said that one of the most helpful things you can do is to keep a headache diary so you and your doctor can pinpoint potential headache triggers that you may need to avoid.

Also, she said, you need to be careful about over-the-counter pain medication use, because while they can initially be helpful, they can cause rebound headaches when used long term. If medications -- prescription or over-the-counter -- don't help, some alternative medicine therapies may be useful, such as massage, acupuncture or biofeedback.

In some cases, people with chronic headaches can benefit from counseling if the headaches stem from stress or anxiety, Goldstein said.

SOURCES: Shuu-Jiun Wang, M.D., section chief, neurology, the Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, and professor, department of neurology, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan; Amy Goldstein, M.D., pediatric neurologist, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh; July 15, 2009, Neurology, online