ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
High Birth Weight Doubles Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis
Low Vitamin D Raises Women's Hip Fracture Risk
New Clues to How Fish Oils Help Arthritis Patients
CANCER
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Gene Screen May Predict Colon Cancer's Return
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
CAREGIVING
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
DIABETES
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
DIET, NUTRITION
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
Functional Foods Uncovered
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Vest Monitors 'Individual' Air Pollution
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
EYE CARE, VISION
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
Food and Water Supply Poisoned by Perchlorate
New Options Offered for Sleep Apnea
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
Cherry-Enriched Diet Cut Heart Risks in Rats
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
MEN'S HEALTH
Countdown to Hair Loss
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
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Marathoners Go the Distance on Heart Health

FRIDAY, April 10 (HealthDay News) -- Long-distance runners are less likely than other people to develop metabolic syndrome, a group of health problems that include high blood pressure and high cholesterol and can lead to diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

U.S. researchers analyzed data from the National Runners' Health Study of more than 62,000 men and 45,000 women. They found that men who ran two or more marathons per year were 41 percent less likely to suffer from high blood pressure, 32 percent less likely to have high cholesterol, and 87 percent less likely to have diabetes than non-marathoners.

Men who ran only one marathon every two to five years were also significantly less likely to have these conditions than non-marathoners.

Study author Paul Williams found that the benefits of running marathons were largely independent of total number of miles run per year by participants. This indicates that isolated distance running bouts in preparation for marathons may have helped decrease the risk of disease. Even runners who didn't enter marathons, but did include longer runs as part of their usual exercise routines, were less likely to have high blood pressure, high cholesterol or diabetes.

The findings were published in the March issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

"All forms of regular exercise provide important health benefits. But these data suggest there may be heightened benefits for those who make the exceptional effort and commitment," Williams said in an American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) news release.

However, he noted that people who regularly run marathons may be genetically predisposed to running long distances.

"Not everyone is going to run marathons, but most can probably exercise a lot more than they are currently. Those with heart conditions should consult their physician," Williams said.

Research shows that even modest sessions of regular exercise, such as walking half an hour a day, can improve health, sustain quality of life and boost longevity, according to the ACSM.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about metabolic syndrome.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American College of Sports Medicine, news release, March 2009

Last Updated: April 10, 2009

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