ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
CANCER
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
DIABETES
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
DIET, NUTRITION
Mediterranean Diet May Help Prevent Depression
The High-Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) Debate
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Skin Woes Take Toll on U.S. Combat Troops
Clear Skies Have Become Less So Over Time, Data Show
Agent Orange Exposure Tied to Prostate Cancer Return
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
FITNESS
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
When It Comes to Toys, Shop Smart, Shop Safe
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Add your Article

Marathoners Go the Distance on Heart Health

FRIDAY, April 10 (HealthDay News) -- Long-distance runners are less likely than other people to develop metabolic syndrome, a group of health problems that include high blood pressure and high cholesterol and can lead to diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

U.S. researchers analyzed data from the National Runners' Health Study of more than 62,000 men and 45,000 women. They found that men who ran two or more marathons per year were 41 percent less likely to suffer from high blood pressure, 32 percent less likely to have high cholesterol, and 87 percent less likely to have diabetes than non-marathoners.

Men who ran only one marathon every two to five years were also significantly less likely to have these conditions than non-marathoners.

Study author Paul Williams found that the benefits of running marathons were largely independent of total number of miles run per year by participants. This indicates that isolated distance running bouts in preparation for marathons may have helped decrease the risk of disease. Even runners who didn't enter marathons, but did include longer runs as part of their usual exercise routines, were less likely to have high blood pressure, high cholesterol or diabetes.

The findings were published in the March issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

"All forms of regular exercise provide important health benefits. But these data suggest there may be heightened benefits for those who make the exceptional effort and commitment," Williams said in an American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) news release.

However, he noted that people who regularly run marathons may be genetically predisposed to running long distances.

"Not everyone is going to run marathons, but most can probably exercise a lot more than they are currently. Those with heart conditions should consult their physician," Williams said.

Research shows that even modest sessions of regular exercise, such as walking half an hour a day, can improve health, sustain quality of life and boost longevity, according to the ACSM.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about metabolic syndrome.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American College of Sports Medicine, news release, March 2009

Last Updated: April 10, 2009

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