ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture Eases Side Effects of Head, Neck Cancer Treatments
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
CANCER
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
CAREGIVING
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Health Tip: After Liposuction
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
DIABETES
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
DIET, NUTRITION
Caffeine May Offer Some Skin Cancer Protection
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Short-Term Air Pollution Exposure May Damage DNA
Rainy Areas in U.S. Show Higher Autism Rates
Genetics, Environment Shape Sexual Behavior
EYE CARE, VISION
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
FITNESS
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Football Can Shrink Players
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Lower Vitamin D Levels in Blacks May Up Heart Risks
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
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Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Additives used to "enhance" uncooked meat and poultry can pose serious health risks for people with kidney disease, researchers say.

Many fresh meat and poultry products are injected with water, sodium, potassium salts, antioxidants and flavorings that are not required to be listed on food labels, according to a report published online July 23 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

But dialysis patients must limit their intake of dietary phosphate, which can boost levels in the blood and cause premature death. Kidney disease patients also need to limit the potassium they consume, because high levels in the blood can cause sudden death, the study authors note in a news release from the American Society of Nephrology.

Many meat and poultry items contain elevated levels of these minerals.

The critical regulation of the body's salt, potassium and acid content is performed by the kidneys, where waste products and excess fluid from the body are removed through the urine. The production of urine helps maintain a stable balance of body chemicals. According to the National Kidney Foundation, 26 million American adults have chronic kidney disease and millions of others are at increased risk.

In the new study, Dr. Richard Sherman and Dr. Ojas Mehta from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, looked at the potassium and phosphate content in "enhanced" and additive-free meats and poultry from area supermarkets.

The "enhanced" products have an average of 28 percent more phosphates than additive-free products, the researchers reported. The potassium levels varied, they found. Additive-free products all had less than 387 milligrams of potassium per 100 grams of protein; five of the 25 products with additives had 692 milligrams or more of potassium per 100 grams of protein.

Most foods that had phosphate and potassium additives reported them on the labels, but eight of the 25 "enhanced" products didn't, according to the report.

"The burden imposed on those seeking to limit dietary phosphorous and potassium could be ameliorated by more complete food labeling by manufacturers," the authors wrote.

SOURCES: American Society of Nephrology, news release, July 23, 2009