ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Stem Cells Might Treat Tough Fractures
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
Vitamin D Plus Calcium Guards Against Fractures
CANCER
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Children's Bath Products Contain Contaminants
MRSA Infections Spreading to Kids in Community
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Asparagus May Ease Hangover
More Educated Choose Healthier Foods, But Pay More
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
Freckles, Moles May Indicate Risk for Eye Cancer
Smog Standards Need Tightening, Activists Say
EYE CARE, VISION
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
FITNESS
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
Health Gains From Lowered Smoking Rates in Jeopardy
Be Healthy, Spend Less
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
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Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Additives used to "enhance" uncooked meat and poultry can pose serious health risks for people with kidney disease, researchers say.

Many fresh meat and poultry products are injected with water, sodium, potassium salts, antioxidants and flavorings that are not required to be listed on food labels, according to a report published online July 23 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

But dialysis patients must limit their intake of dietary phosphate, which can boost levels in the blood and cause premature death. Kidney disease patients also need to limit the potassium they consume, because high levels in the blood can cause sudden death, the study authors note in a news release from the American Society of Nephrology.

Many meat and poultry items contain elevated levels of these minerals.

The critical regulation of the body's salt, potassium and acid content is performed by the kidneys, where waste products and excess fluid from the body are removed through the urine. The production of urine helps maintain a stable balance of body chemicals. According to the National Kidney Foundation, 26 million American adults have chronic kidney disease and millions of others are at increased risk.

In the new study, Dr. Richard Sherman and Dr. Ojas Mehta from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, looked at the potassium and phosphate content in "enhanced" and additive-free meats and poultry from area supermarkets.

The "enhanced" products have an average of 28 percent more phosphates than additive-free products, the researchers reported. The potassium levels varied, they found. Additive-free products all had less than 387 milligrams of potassium per 100 grams of protein; five of the 25 products with additives had 692 milligrams or more of potassium per 100 grams of protein.

Most foods that had phosphate and potassium additives reported them on the labels, but eight of the 25 "enhanced" products didn't, according to the report.

"The burden imposed on those seeking to limit dietary phosphorous and potassium could be ameliorated by more complete food labeling by manufacturers," the authors wrote.

SOURCES: American Society of Nephrology, news release, July 23, 2009