ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Ginkgo No Shield Against Alzheimer's
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Many Americans Fall Short on Their Vitamin D
Fractures in Older Adults Up Death Risk
B Cells Can Act Alone in Autoimmune Diseases
CANCER
Family History Key Player in Brain Cancer Risk
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
CAREGIVING
Many Alzheimer's Caregivers Admit to Abusive Behavior
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
DIABETES
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
The Best Diet? That Depends on You
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Controversial Chemical Lingers Longer in the Body
Improved Fungicides May Be Easier on Environment
Global Warming Linked to Heightened Kidney Stone Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
FITNESS
Be Healthy, Spend Less
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
SENIORS
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
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Meat-Eating Dinosaurs Used Legs and Arms Like Birds

WEDNESDAY, March 4 (HealthDay News) -- Meat-eating dinosaurs that walked on their hind legs (theropods) and held their arms with their palms faced inward -- just like birds -- were roaming the Earth at least 198 million years ago.

It's long been known that theropods, such as Tyrannosaurus rex and Velociraptor, held their arms this way. But a lack of clear fossil evidence has made it difficult to determine when this bird-like posture evolved.

A report published online this week in the journal PLoS One details fossilized handprints and footprints made by a large, meat-eating dinosaur about 198 million years ago. The tracks in rocks in St. George, Utah, were made by a theropod that sat down and extended its arms far enough that they left marks in the ground.

"The crouching tracks are preserved on the shore of an ancient lake," the paper's lead author, Andrew Milner, a paleontologist at the St. George Dinosaur Discovery Site at Johnson Farm museum, said in a journal news release. "The theropod that made the tracks may have been in the lake but walked out and up a shallow slope and sat down for some reason."

"These tracks are important because the handprints have inward-pointing fingers, showing that even very early theropods had bird-like arms and hands with inward-facing palms," Milner said.

Co-author Jerry Harris, of Dixie State College in St. George, said in the news release that "while theropod arms couldn't pivot to make the palms face up or down the way a human's hands can, they certainly could move."

"In particular, the wrist could pivot up and down, allowing the outside of the hand to move toward the side of the arm, a motion impossible for humans," Harris said. "But this is the same motion birds have that allows them to fold their wings."

"These tracks show that this ability evolved long before feathery wings did, and much earlier than this posture is known from theropod skeletons," he said. "Birds only inherited this ability from their ancestors."

The theropod tracks were found in a large area that also included the fossilized tracks of more than 1,000 large and small dinosaurs and small, early relatives of alligators and crocodiles.

More information

The University of California Museum of Paleontology has more about theropods.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: PLoS One, news release, March 3, 2009

Last Updated: March 04, 2009

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