ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Osteoporosis May Raise Risk for Vertigo
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
CANCER
Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
Family History Key Player in Brain Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Mom's Smoking May Lead to SIDS
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
DIABETES
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
More Educated Choose Healthier Foods, But Pay More
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Gas Cooking Might Up Your Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Coffee Cuts Liver Scarring in Hepatitis C
Deployment Takes Toll on Army Wives
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Drink Away Dementia?
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
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Meat-Eating Dinosaurs Used Legs and Arms Like Birds

WEDNESDAY, March 4 (HealthDay News) -- Meat-eating dinosaurs that walked on their hind legs (theropods) and held their arms with their palms faced inward -- just like birds -- were roaming the Earth at least 198 million years ago.

It's long been known that theropods, such as Tyrannosaurus rex and Velociraptor, held their arms this way. But a lack of clear fossil evidence has made it difficult to determine when this bird-like posture evolved.

A report published online this week in the journal PLoS One details fossilized handprints and footprints made by a large, meat-eating dinosaur about 198 million years ago. The tracks in rocks in St. George, Utah, were made by a theropod that sat down and extended its arms far enough that they left marks in the ground.

"The crouching tracks are preserved on the shore of an ancient lake," the paper's lead author, Andrew Milner, a paleontologist at the St. George Dinosaur Discovery Site at Johnson Farm museum, said in a journal news release. "The theropod that made the tracks may have been in the lake but walked out and up a shallow slope and sat down for some reason."

"These tracks are important because the handprints have inward-pointing fingers, showing that even very early theropods had bird-like arms and hands with inward-facing palms," Milner said.

Co-author Jerry Harris, of Dixie State College in St. George, said in the news release that "while theropod arms couldn't pivot to make the palms face up or down the way a human's hands can, they certainly could move."

"In particular, the wrist could pivot up and down, allowing the outside of the hand to move toward the side of the arm, a motion impossible for humans," Harris said. "But this is the same motion birds have that allows them to fold their wings."

"These tracks show that this ability evolved long before feathery wings did, and much earlier than this posture is known from theropod skeletons," he said. "Birds only inherited this ability from their ancestors."

The theropod tracks were found in a large area that also included the fossilized tracks of more than 1,000 large and small dinosaurs and small, early relatives of alligators and crocodiles.

More information

The University of California Museum of Paleontology has more about theropods.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: PLoS One, news release, March 3, 2009

Last Updated: March 04, 2009

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