ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Genes May Help Drive Rotator Cuff Injury
For All Their Plusses, Pets Pose a Risk for Falls, Too
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
CANCER
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Vitamin D May Lower Colon Cancer Risk
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
CAREGIVING
Timing May Matter in Organ Donation Decisions
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Fruits, Vegetables, Teas May Cut Smokers' Cancer Risk
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gene Explains How High-Fructose Diets Lead to Insulin Resistance
Bed Bugs Bring No Disease Danger
Global Warming Linked to Heightened Kidney Stone Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Less Education May Mean Poorer Health
Have Fun But Put Play It Safe on the 4th
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Cherry-Enriched Diet Cut Heart Risks in Rats
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Frequent Feedings May Be Making Babies Fat
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
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Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning

TUESDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Meditation might help protect college students against stress and improve their ability to learn, suggests a study that examined the effects of transcendental meditation (TM) on stress reactivity and brain functioning.

Volunteers from U.S. colleges, mostly in the Washington, D.C., area, underwent physiological and psychological tests and were then randomly assigned to a TM or a control group.

Ten weeks later, the students in the TM group had higher scores on a standardized brain measurement scale and reported being less sleepy, not as jumpy and less irritable.

"The control group had lower Brain Integration Scale scores, indicating their brain functioning was more fragmented -- which can lead to more scattered and disorganized thinking and planning," Fred Travis, director of the brain research center at the Maharishi University of Management in Fairfield, Iowa, and lead author of the study said in a university news release. "The controls also showed an increase in sympathetic reactivity and sleepiness, which can correspond to greater anxiety, worry and irritability."

However, meditation seemed to buffer students against the stresses of college life, the research team said.

During the study, students placed in the meditation group showed an increase in their Brain Integration Scale scores, "indicating greater breadth of planning, thinking and perception of the environment," Travis said. "The sympathetic reactivity and sleepiness decreased among the TM group, which corresponds to greater emotional balance and wakefulness."

"These statistically significant results among college students suggest that the practice of the Transcendental Meditation technique could be of substantial value for anyone facing an intense and challenging learning/work environment," he said.

The study was published in the Feb. 24 issue of the International Journal of Psychophysiology.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about health and safety for college students.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Maharishi University of Management, news release, Feb. 24, 2009

Last Updated: Feb. 24, 2009

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