ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
CANCER
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
More Cancer Tests Mean More False-Positive Results
Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease
CAREGIVING
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Health Tip: After Liposuction
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
Herb Shows Potential for Rheumatoid Arthriti
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Freckles, Moles May Indicate Risk for Eye Cancer
Clear Skies Have Become Less So Over Time, Data Show
As Earth Warms, Lyme Disease Could Flourish
EYE CARE, VISION
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
FITNESS
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
Avoiding a Holiday Season of Discontent
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
Asparagus May Ease Hangover
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
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Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed

TUESDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- If you're tossing and turning and having trouble getting a good night's sleep, you may want to consider meditation, researchers suggest.

People with primary insomnia reported that they slept better after trying meditation, according to a new study to be presented June 9 at SLEEP, the annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, in Seattle.

Primary insomnia is described as difficulty getting to sleep or staying asleep over a time period of at least one month, according to the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

While most insomnia occurs along with another physical or mental illness or disorder, or as a side effect of medications or other substances, primary insomnia occurs on its own.

In the study, researchers divided 11 participants aged 25 to 45 with chronic primary insomnia into two groups. One group participated in Kriya Yoga -- a form of meditation that helps an individual focus internalized attention and can reduce arousal -- as well as health education.

The other group received information about improving health through exercise, nutrition, weight loss and stress management but did not participate in meditation.

After two months, the meditation group reported improvements in sleep quality, how long it took to get to sleep, total sleep time, total wake time, sleep efficiency and depression, the researchers reported.

Primary insomnia is believed to be a problem of hyperarousal, with high levels of arousal noted 24 hours a day, said lead study author Dr. Ramadevi Gourineni, director of the insomnia program at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Evanston, Ill.

"Results of the study show that teaching deep relaxation techniques during the daytime can help improve sleep at night," Gourineni said in a news release from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

About 9.4 percent of U.S. residents, or an estimated 20 million people, try meditating during a 12-month period, according to a 2007 study by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. People reported using meditation for various health problems, including anxiety, pain, depression, stress and insomnia.

A 2007 review of the scientific literature found some evidence that meditation is associated with health benefits, possibly by causing heart rate and breathing to slow, improving blood flow and reducing activity in the sympathetic nervous system (the body's fight-or-flight mechanism).