ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Gene Plays Key Role in Clubfoot
Fall Sports Peak Time for Lower Leg Damage
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
CANCER
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
Gene Screen May Predict Colon Cancer's Return
CAREGIVING
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
DIABETES
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Quick Weight Loss May Be Best for Long-Term Success
Oregano Shown to be the Most Powerful Culinary Herb
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Exhaust From Railroad Diesel Linked to Lung Ailments
Population-Based Strategy Urged to Cut U.S. Obesity Rate
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
EYE CARE, VISION
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
Decorative Halloween Eye Lenses May Pose Serious Risks
FITNESS
Seniors Who Exercise Help Their Health
Moderate Aerobic Exercise Lowers Diabetics' Liver Fat
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Treat symptoms (result of disease) or diagnose systems (cause of disease)?
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
Ginkgo Won't Prevent Heart Attack, Stroke in Elderly
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
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Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed

TUESDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- If you're tossing and turning and having trouble getting a good night's sleep, you may want to consider meditation, researchers suggest.

People with primary insomnia reported that they slept better after trying meditation, according to a new study to be presented June 9 at SLEEP, the annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, in Seattle.

Primary insomnia is described as difficulty getting to sleep or staying asleep over a time period of at least one month, according to the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

While most insomnia occurs along with another physical or mental illness or disorder, or as a side effect of medications or other substances, primary insomnia occurs on its own.

In the study, researchers divided 11 participants aged 25 to 45 with chronic primary insomnia into two groups. One group participated in Kriya Yoga -- a form of meditation that helps an individual focus internalized attention and can reduce arousal -- as well as health education.

The other group received information about improving health through exercise, nutrition, weight loss and stress management but did not participate in meditation.

After two months, the meditation group reported improvements in sleep quality, how long it took to get to sleep, total sleep time, total wake time, sleep efficiency and depression, the researchers reported.

Primary insomnia is believed to be a problem of hyperarousal, with high levels of arousal noted 24 hours a day, said lead study author Dr. Ramadevi Gourineni, director of the insomnia program at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Evanston, Ill.

"Results of the study show that teaching deep relaxation techniques during the daytime can help improve sleep at night," Gourineni said in a news release from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

About 9.4 percent of U.S. residents, or an estimated 20 million people, try meditating during a 12-month period, according to a 2007 study by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. People reported using meditation for various health problems, including anxiety, pain, depression, stress and insomnia.

A 2007 review of the scientific literature found some evidence that meditation is associated with health benefits, possibly by causing heart rate and breathing to slow, improving blood flow and reducing activity in the sympathetic nervous system (the body's fight-or-flight mechanism).