ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Osteoporosis May Raise Risk for Vertigo
Gene Plays Key Role in Clubfoot
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
CANCER
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Get to Know the Pap Test
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
CAREGIVING
Bariatric Surgery Centers Don't Deliver Better Outcomes
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
DIABETES
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
DIET, NUTRITION
Is Your Refrigerator Getting Enough Attention For Your Raw Food Success?
'Soda Tax' Wins Health Experts' Support
Mediterranean Diet May Help Prevent Depression
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Cats Can Trigger Eczema in Some Infants
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
EYE CARE, VISION
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
FITNESS
Fliers Can Keep Blood Clots at Bay
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
Spread of Swine Flu in Japan Could Raise WHO Alert to Highest Level
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
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Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed

TUESDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- If you're tossing and turning and having trouble getting a good night's sleep, you may want to consider meditation, researchers suggest.

People with primary insomnia reported that they slept better after trying meditation, according to a new study to be presented June 9 at SLEEP, the annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, in Seattle.

Primary insomnia is described as difficulty getting to sleep or staying asleep over a time period of at least one month, according to the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

While most insomnia occurs along with another physical or mental illness or disorder, or as a side effect of medications or other substances, primary insomnia occurs on its own.

In the study, researchers divided 11 participants aged 25 to 45 with chronic primary insomnia into two groups. One group participated in Kriya Yoga -- a form of meditation that helps an individual focus internalized attention and can reduce arousal -- as well as health education.

The other group received information about improving health through exercise, nutrition, weight loss and stress management but did not participate in meditation.

After two months, the meditation group reported improvements in sleep quality, how long it took to get to sleep, total sleep time, total wake time, sleep efficiency and depression, the researchers reported.

Primary insomnia is believed to be a problem of hyperarousal, with high levels of arousal noted 24 hours a day, said lead study author Dr. Ramadevi Gourineni, director of the insomnia program at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Evanston, Ill.

"Results of the study show that teaching deep relaxation techniques during the daytime can help improve sleep at night," Gourineni said in a news release from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

About 9.4 percent of U.S. residents, or an estimated 20 million people, try meditating during a 12-month period, according to a 2007 study by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. People reported using meditation for various health problems, including anxiety, pain, depression, stress and insomnia.

A 2007 review of the scientific literature found some evidence that meditation is associated with health benefits, possibly by causing heart rate and breathing to slow, improving blood flow and reducing activity in the sympathetic nervous system (the body's fight-or-flight mechanism).