ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
High Birth Weight Doubles Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
Genes May Help Drive Rotator Cuff Injury
CANCER
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
CAREGIVING
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
DIABETES
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating More Soy May Be Good For Your Lung Function
Antioxidant-Rich Foods Lose Nutritional Luster Over Time
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
Warmer-Than-Average Temperatures Raise Migraine Risk
Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes
EYE CARE, VISION
Blood Sugar Control Helps Diabetics Preserve Sight
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
FITNESS
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Run for Your Life
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Go To Work But Skip The Car
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Any Old Cane Won't Do
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
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Mediterranean Diet Enriched With Nuts Cuts Heart Risks

MONDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In older adults at risk for heart disease, a Mediterranean diet plus daily servings of mixed nuts may help manage metabolic syndrome, according to a Spanish study.

Metabolic syndrome describes a group of health problems that includes abdominal obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and high glucose levels -- all of which are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Previous research suggests that a Mediterranean diet -- which includes lots of cereals, vegetables, fruits and olive oil, moderate consumption of fish and alcohol, and low intake of dairy, meats and sweets -- lowers the risk of metabolic syndrome.

This new study included 1,224 people, ages 55 to 80, at high risk for cardiovascular disease. They were randomly assigned to one of three groups. The control group received advice on a low-fat diet while the other two groups received quarterly education about the Mediterranean diet. One of the Mediterranean diet groups received one liter per week of virgin olive oil, while the other group received 30 grams per day of mixed nuts.

At the start of the study, 61.4 percent of the participants met criteria for metabolic syndrome. After one year, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome decreased by 13.7 percent in the mixed nut group, by 6.7 percent in the olive oil group, and by 2 percent in the control group.

There were no weight changes in any of the groups over the one-year study period. But the number of people with large waist circumference, high triglycerides or high blood pressure significantly decreased in the Mediterranean diet/mixed nuts group compared with the control group. This suggests that the Mediterranean diet with mixed nuts improves certain features of metabolic syndrome, such as oxygen-related cell damage, insulin resistance, and chronic inflammation, the researchers said.

"Traditionally, dietary patterns recommended for health have been low-fat, high-carbohydrate diets, which generally are not palatable. The results of the present study show that a non-energy-restricted traditional Mediterranean diet enriched with nuts, which is high in fat, high in unsaturated fat and palatable, is a useful tool in managing the metabolic syndrome," concluded Dr. Jordi Salas-Salvado, of the University of Rovira i Virgili, and colleagues.

The study was published Dec. 8 in the journal Archives of Internal Medicine.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about metabolic syndrome.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, Dec. 8, 2008

Last Updated: Dec. 08, 2008

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