ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones
Pain More a Cause of Arthritis Than a Symptom
Brazilian Mint Tea Naturally Good for Pain Relief
CANCER
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
CAREGIVING
Babies Born in High Pollen Months at Wheezing Risk
New Guidelines for Treating Heart Failure
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
DIET, NUTRITION
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Staying Slim Is Good for the Environment
Topical Drugs May Pollute Waterways
Pregnant Rural Women More at Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
FITNESS
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
Walking Golf Course Affects Swing, Performance
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Maximize Your Run
Biomarkers May Help Measure Rate of Decline in Dementia
Sleep and Do Better
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Pool Chemicals Raise Kids Allergy, Asthma Risk
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
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Mediterranean Diet Enriched With Nuts Cuts Heart Risks

MONDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In older adults at risk for heart disease, a Mediterranean diet plus daily servings of mixed nuts may help manage metabolic syndrome, according to a Spanish study.

Metabolic syndrome describes a group of health problems that includes abdominal obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and high glucose levels -- all of which are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Previous research suggests that a Mediterranean diet -- which includes lots of cereals, vegetables, fruits and olive oil, moderate consumption of fish and alcohol, and low intake of dairy, meats and sweets -- lowers the risk of metabolic syndrome.

This new study included 1,224 people, ages 55 to 80, at high risk for cardiovascular disease. They were randomly assigned to one of three groups. The control group received advice on a low-fat diet while the other two groups received quarterly education about the Mediterranean diet. One of the Mediterranean diet groups received one liter per week of virgin olive oil, while the other group received 30 grams per day of mixed nuts.

At the start of the study, 61.4 percent of the participants met criteria for metabolic syndrome. After one year, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome decreased by 13.7 percent in the mixed nut group, by 6.7 percent in the olive oil group, and by 2 percent in the control group.

There were no weight changes in any of the groups over the one-year study period. But the number of people with large waist circumference, high triglycerides or high blood pressure significantly decreased in the Mediterranean diet/mixed nuts group compared with the control group. This suggests that the Mediterranean diet with mixed nuts improves certain features of metabolic syndrome, such as oxygen-related cell damage, insulin resistance, and chronic inflammation, the researchers said.

"Traditionally, dietary patterns recommended for health have been low-fat, high-carbohydrate diets, which generally are not palatable. The results of the present study show that a non-energy-restricted traditional Mediterranean diet enriched with nuts, which is high in fat, high in unsaturated fat and palatable, is a useful tool in managing the metabolic syndrome," concluded Dr. Jordi Salas-Salvado, of the University of Rovira i Virgili, and colleagues.

The study was published Dec. 8 in the journal Archives of Internal Medicine.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about metabolic syndrome.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, Dec. 8, 2008

Last Updated: Dec. 08, 2008

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