ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
Breast-feeding Might Shield Women From Rheumatoid Arthritis
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
CANCER
Gene Studies Reveal Cancer's Secrets
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
CAREGIVING
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Timing May Matter in Organ Donation Decisions
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Holistic Dentistry-My View
DIABETES
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
DIET, NUTRITION
Vitamin B12 Key to Aging Brain
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Hypertension May Hit Black Males Earlier
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
Chemicals in Carpets, Non-Stick Pans Tied to Thyroid Disease
EYE CARE, VISION
Magnetic Pulses to Brain Improve Lazy Eye in Adults
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
FITNESS
Maximize Your Run
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
8 Drugs Doctors Would Never Take
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
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Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks

TUESDAY, March 10 (HealthDay News) -- Women who have migraines during pregnancy are 15 times more likely than other women to suffer a stroke, twice as likely to have heart disease and three times more likely to have blood clots and other vascular problems during pregnancy, says a U.S. study.

"Good prenatal care is essential. Women with persistent and severe migraine during pregnancy should be aware of their risk factors, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, history of blood clots, heart disease and prior stroke," the study's lead investigator, Dr. Cheryl Bushnell, a neurologist at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, said in a Wake Forest news release. "There also seems to be a relationship between migraines and preeclampsia, one of the most common and dangerous complications of pregnancy."

The researchers also found that women 35 years and older were more likely to have migraines during pregnancy. Women age 40 and older were 2.4 times more likely to have migraines than women younger than 20, and white women were more likely to have them than women of any other race or ethnicity.

"Migraines, particularly those associated with an aura or visual changes around the time of the headache, have been previously linked to stroke and heart disease in women," Bushnell said. "This study further validates the association between the two."

For the study, she and her colleagues analyzed data from 33,956 pregnant women diagnosed with migraine. The findings were published in this week's issue of BMJ.

As many as 26 percent of women of childbearing age experience migraines.

"While some women experience relief from migraine headaches while pregnant, others have migraines that are more frequent and severe," Bushnell said. "The reasons these severe migraines are associated with stroke and vascular disease is not clear, but it may be that some women do not compensate as well for the increased vascular stresses of pregnancy, such as increased blood volume, stroke volume and heart rate."

"Regardless of the cause," she added, "active migraine during pregnancy should be viewed as a potential marker of vascular disease."

More information

The U.S. National Women's Health Information Center has more about migraine.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, news release, March 11, 2009; BMJ, news release, March 11, 2009

Last Updated: March 11, 2009

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