ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Ginkgo No Shield Against Alzheimer's
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Traditional Chinese Therapy May Help Ease Eczema
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Genes May Help Drive Rotator Cuff Injury
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
For All Their Plusses, Pets Pose a Risk for Falls, Too
CANCER
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Selenium, Omega-3s May Stave Off Colorectal Cancer
More Cancer Tests Mean More False-Positive Results
CAREGIVING
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
Flu Strikes a Milder Blow This Season
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
DIABETES
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
DIET, NUTRITION
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
Trans Fat Labeling Gets Tricky
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
EYE CARE, VISION
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
FITNESS
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Exercise 30 Minutes a Day? Who Knew!
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Asparagus May Ease Hangover
Sun, Smoke, Extra Weight Add Years to Skin
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Pool Chemicals Raise Kids Allergy, Asthma Risk
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Add your Article

Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks

TUESDAY, March 10 (HealthDay News) -- Women who have migraines during pregnancy are 15 times more likely than other women to suffer a stroke, twice as likely to have heart disease and three times more likely to have blood clots and other vascular problems during pregnancy, says a U.S. study.

"Good prenatal care is essential. Women with persistent and severe migraine during pregnancy should be aware of their risk factors, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, history of blood clots, heart disease and prior stroke," the study's lead investigator, Dr. Cheryl Bushnell, a neurologist at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, said in a Wake Forest news release. "There also seems to be a relationship between migraines and preeclampsia, one of the most common and dangerous complications of pregnancy."

The researchers also found that women 35 years and older were more likely to have migraines during pregnancy. Women age 40 and older were 2.4 times more likely to have migraines than women younger than 20, and white women were more likely to have them than women of any other race or ethnicity.

"Migraines, particularly those associated with an aura or visual changes around the time of the headache, have been previously linked to stroke and heart disease in women," Bushnell said. "This study further validates the association between the two."

For the study, she and her colleagues analyzed data from 33,956 pregnant women diagnosed with migraine. The findings were published in this week's issue of BMJ.

As many as 26 percent of women of childbearing age experience migraines.

"While some women experience relief from migraine headaches while pregnant, others have migraines that are more frequent and severe," Bushnell said. "The reasons these severe migraines are associated with stroke and vascular disease is not clear, but it may be that some women do not compensate as well for the increased vascular stresses of pregnancy, such as increased blood volume, stroke volume and heart rate."

"Regardless of the cause," she added, "active migraine during pregnancy should be viewed as a potential marker of vascular disease."

More information

The U.S. National Women's Health Information Center has more about migraine.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, news release, March 11, 2009; BMJ, news release, March 11, 2009

Last Updated: March 11, 2009

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