ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
Low Vitamin D Raises Women's Hip Fracture Risk
Scientists ID New Genes Tied to Crohn's Disease
CANCER
Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
CAREGIVING
MRSA Infections Spreading to Kids in Community
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
Babies Born in High Pollen Months at Wheezing Risk
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
To Feel Better, Low-Fat Diet May Be Best
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Most Mt. Everest Deaths Occur Near Summit During Descent
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
EYE CARE, VISION
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
FITNESS
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
New Methods Could Speed Production of Flu Vaccines
'Soda Tax' Wins Health Experts' Support
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Countdown to Hair Loss
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Add your Article

Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease

MONDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Selenium, a trace mineral found in grains, nuts and meats, may help prevent high-risk bladder cancer, a U.S. study finds.

Dartmouth Medical School researchers compared selenium levels in 767 newly diagnosed bladder cancer cases to levels in 1,108 people without the disease. While there was no link between selenium and bladder cancer in the overall study population, higher rates of selenium were associated with reductions in bladder cancer among women, moderate smokers and patients with p53 positive bladder cancer.

The findings were published in the December issue of Cancer Prevention Research.

"There are different pathways by which bladder cancer evolves, and it is thought that one of the major pathways involves alterations in the p53 gene. Bladder cancers stemming from these alternations are associated with more advanced disease," study corresponding author Margaret Karagas, a professor of community and family medicine at Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center, said in an American Association for Cancer Research news release.

Previous research has shown a similar association between selenium and bladder cancer in women, but this study is one of the first to identify a link between selenium and p53 positive bladder cancer.

"Ultimately, if it is true that selenium can prevent a certain subset of individuals, like women, from developing bladder cancer, or prevent certain types of tumors, such as those evolving through the p53 pathway, from developing, it gives us clues about how the tumors could be prevented in the future and potentially lead to chemopreventive efforts," Karagas said.

The researchers hope to replicate their findings in a larger study to further examine the association between selenium and bladder cancer in women and patients with p53 tumors.

More information

The American Cancer Society has more about bladder cancer.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Association for Cancer Research, news release, Dec. 8, 2008

Last Updated: Dec. 08, 2008

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