ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Barefoot Lifestyle Has Its Dangers
Osteoporosis May Raise Risk for Vertigo
Almost Half of Adults Will Develop Knee Osteoarthritis by 85
CANCER
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Vitamin D May Improve Melanoma Survival
Herb May Counter Liver Damage From Chemo
CAREGIVING
Many Alzheimer's Caregivers Admit to Abusive Behavior
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
DIET, NUTRITION
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
To Feel Better, Low-Fat Diet May Be Best
Olive Oil May Be Key to Mediterranean Diet's Benefits
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Main Ingredients in Household Dust Come From Outdoors
Freckles, Moles May Indicate Risk for Eye Cancer
EYE CARE, VISION
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
FITNESS
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Be Healthy, Spend Less
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Scary Toxins Make Halloween Face Paints Questionable
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
MEN'S HEALTH
Countdown to Hair Loss
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Drink Away Dementia?
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
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Minorities Distrust Medical System More

FRIDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Minority women, especially black women, have more distrust of the medical system, which leads to delays in screening for breast cancer, new research shows.

Almost half of all women agreed that they had "sometimes been deceived or misled by health-care organizations." Eighteen percent strongly agreed with the statement.

On another gauge of mistrust, 39 percent of black women agreed that "health-care organizations don't always keep your information totally private," versus 15 percent of Latinas and 9 percent of Arab-American women.

More mistrust corresponded with lower screening rates.

"While insurance obviously plays a large role in screening [94 percent of blacks had insurance, 45 percent of Latinas and 43 percent of Arab-American women], we can't ignore that medical mistrust plays a large role. We need to think about tailoring our interventions," said study author Karen Patricia Williams, an assistant professor at Michigan State University's College of Human Medicine in Lansing.

The study was presented Thursday at the American Association for Cancer Research's Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities, in Carefree, Ariz.

It was one of four studies that were highlighted in a Thursday news conference, at which Williams and others spoke.

A second study found troubling misunderstandings among Hispanics about the human papillomavirus (HPV), which is sexually transmitted and can cause cervical cancer.

In general, many of the men and women interviewed (who were HPV-negative), did not know much about HPV; many confused this virus with HIV.

"There was a lot of fatalism among women when told about the relationship between HPV and cervical cancer," added study author Maria E. Fernandez, an assistant professor of health promotion and behavioral sciences at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, School of Public Health. "They thought of it as a death sentence."

Men were more concerned about diagnosis and treatment but also felt that a woman disclosing her HPV status was an admission of infidelity. But, as the interviews continued, they realized the travels of the virus could be ambiguous and that the man, in fact, could have infected the woman.

A third study, from the Jane Addams College of Social Work at the University of Illinois-Chicago, found that reasons for screening or not screening varied, depending on the specific cancer involved. Forty percent of participants did not have health insurance, though almost two-thirds had a regular doctor.

A fourth and final study delved into why progress in recruiting minorities and women into clinical trials has been slow from the clinicians' perspective.

Lack of institutional support and lack of incentives in individual oncology clinics (both public and private) emerged as key obstacles to effective recruitment.

"None of the places we studied had very effective recruitment programs," said study author Daniel Dohan, an associate professor of health policy and social medicine at the University of California San Francisco. Doctors also tended to put a premium on immediate care, rather than matching someone with the appropriate trial.

-Amanda Gardner

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on cancer disparities among minorities.



SOURCES: Feb. 5, 2009, teleconference with Karen Patricia Williams, Ph.D., assistant professor, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, Lansing; Maria E. Fernandez, Ph.D., assistant professor, health promotion and behavioral sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, School of Public Health; and Daniel Dohan, Ph.D., associate professor, health policy and social medicine, University of California, San Francisco

Last Updated: Feb. 06, 2009

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