ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
Many Americans Fall Short on Their Vitamin D
Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years
CANCER
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer
CAREGIVING
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Low Vitamin A, C Intake Tied to Asthma Risk
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Accumulated Lead May Affect Older Women's Brains
Ozone Pollution Taking Toll on American Lives
1976 Italian Dioxin Release Damaged Babies' Thyroids
EYE CARE, VISION
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
FITNESS
Weak Muscles May Cause 'Runner's Knee'
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
Exercise 30 Minutes a Day? Who Knew!
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Food and Water Supply Poisoned by Perchlorate
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
St. John's Wort Doesn't Work for ADHD
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Add your Article

Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma

TUESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- A substance secreted by eczema-damaged skin might trigger asthma in children, U.S. researchers suggest.

The theory comes from a study of mice with an eczema-like condition, which suggested that early treatment of eczema and inhibition of the trigger substance might help prevent asthma.

An estimated 50 percent to 70 percent of children with severe eczema, known as atopic dermatitis, develop asthma, compared with about 9 percent of children in the general population. In the United States, about 17 percent of children have eczema, although not all cases are severe.

The progression from eczema to asthma is called the atopic march.

"Over the years, the clinical community has struggled to explain atopic march," Raphael Kopan, a professor of developmental biology and dermatology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and an author of the study, said in a news release from the school.

"So, when we found that the skin of mice with an eczema-like condition produced a substance previously implicated in asthma, we decided to investigate further," Kopan said. "We found that the mice also suffered from asthma-like responses to inhaled allergens, implicating the substance, called TSLP, as the link between eczema and asthma."

The researchers found that TSLP (thylmic stromal lymphopoietin) is secreted by damaged skin to alert the body that the skin's protective barrier has failed. TSLP activates an immune response that fights invaders.

"We are excited, because we've narrowed down the problem of atopic march to one molecule," Kopan said. "We've shown that skin can act as a signaling organ and drive allergic inflammation in the lung by releasing TSLP. Now, it will be important to address how to prevent defective skin from producing TSLP."

"If that can be done," she said, "the link between eczema and asthma could be broken."

The study appears May 19 in the journal PLoS Biology.

More information

The American Academy of Dermatology has more about eczema.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, news release, May 18, 2009

Last Updated: May 19, 2009

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