ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
Healthy adults have potential autoimmune disease-causing cells
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
CANCER
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
CAREGIVING
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
MRSA Infections Spreading to Kids in Community
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
DIABETES
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Compound in Red Wine Fights Ravages of Age
Eat Up, But Eat Healthy This Holiday Season
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Topical Drugs May Pollute Waterways
Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
EYE CARE, VISION
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
FITNESS
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Soluble Fiber, But Not Bran, Soothes Irritable Bowel
Hand-Washing Habits Still Need Improvement: Survey Says
U.S. Prepares for Possible Return of Swine Flu in Fall
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Ginkgo Won't Prevent Heart Attack, Stroke in Elderly
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Add your Article

Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma

TUESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- A substance secreted by eczema-damaged skin might trigger asthma in children, U.S. researchers suggest.

The theory comes from a study of mice with an eczema-like condition, which suggested that early treatment of eczema and inhibition of the trigger substance might help prevent asthma.

An estimated 50 percent to 70 percent of children with severe eczema, known as atopic dermatitis, develop asthma, compared with about 9 percent of children in the general population. In the United States, about 17 percent of children have eczema, although not all cases are severe.

The progression from eczema to asthma is called the atopic march.

"Over the years, the clinical community has struggled to explain atopic march," Raphael Kopan, a professor of developmental biology and dermatology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and an author of the study, said in a news release from the school.

"So, when we found that the skin of mice with an eczema-like condition produced a substance previously implicated in asthma, we decided to investigate further," Kopan said. "We found that the mice also suffered from asthma-like responses to inhaled allergens, implicating the substance, called TSLP, as the link between eczema and asthma."

The researchers found that TSLP (thylmic stromal lymphopoietin) is secreted by damaged skin to alert the body that the skin's protective barrier has failed. TSLP activates an immune response that fights invaders.

"We are excited, because we've narrowed down the problem of atopic march to one molecule," Kopan said. "We've shown that skin can act as a signaling organ and drive allergic inflammation in the lung by releasing TSLP. Now, it will be important to address how to prevent defective skin from producing TSLP."

"If that can be done," she said, "the link between eczema and asthma could be broken."

The study appears May 19 in the journal PLoS Biology.

More information

The American Academy of Dermatology has more about eczema.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, news release, May 18, 2009

Last Updated: May 19, 2009

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