ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
Too Few Screened for Abdominal Aneurysm, Study Says
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
CANCER
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Gene Screen May Predict Colon Cancer's Return
Get to Know the Pap Test
CAREGIVING
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Caregiving May Lengthen Life
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
DIABETES
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Myrrh May Lower High Cholesterol
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Holiday Eating Without the Guilt -- or the Pounds
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Warmer-Than-Average Temperatures Raise Migraine Risk
Is It Safe to Go in the Gulf Coast's Water?
EYE CARE, VISION
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
FITNESS
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Seniors Who Exercise Help Their Health
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Proven Strategies for Avoiding Colds and the Flu
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
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Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma

TUESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- A substance secreted by eczema-damaged skin might trigger asthma in children, U.S. researchers suggest.

The theory comes from a study of mice with an eczema-like condition, which suggested that early treatment of eczema and inhibition of the trigger substance might help prevent asthma.

An estimated 50 percent to 70 percent of children with severe eczema, known as atopic dermatitis, develop asthma, compared with about 9 percent of children in the general population. In the United States, about 17 percent of children have eczema, although not all cases are severe.

The progression from eczema to asthma is called the atopic march.

"Over the years, the clinical community has struggled to explain atopic march," Raphael Kopan, a professor of developmental biology and dermatology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and an author of the study, said in a news release from the school.

"So, when we found that the skin of mice with an eczema-like condition produced a substance previously implicated in asthma, we decided to investigate further," Kopan said. "We found that the mice also suffered from asthma-like responses to inhaled allergens, implicating the substance, called TSLP, as the link between eczema and asthma."

The researchers found that TSLP (thylmic stromal lymphopoietin) is secreted by damaged skin to alert the body that the skin's protective barrier has failed. TSLP activates an immune response that fights invaders.

"We are excited, because we've narrowed down the problem of atopic march to one molecule," Kopan said. "We've shown that skin can act as a signaling organ and drive allergic inflammation in the lung by releasing TSLP. Now, it will be important to address how to prevent defective skin from producing TSLP."

"If that can be done," she said, "the link between eczema and asthma could be broken."

The study appears May 19 in the journal PLoS Biology.

More information

The American Academy of Dermatology has more about eczema.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, news release, May 18, 2009

Last Updated: May 19, 2009

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