ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones
CANCER
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
CAREGIVING
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
For Dialysis Patients, More Pills = Lower Quality of Life
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
DIABETES
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
'Soda Tax' Wins Health Experts' Support
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
1976 Italian Dioxin Release Damaged Babies' Thyroids
Air Pollution May Cause Appendicitis: Study Reveals
EYE CARE, VISION
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
FITNESS
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
Go To Work But Skip The Car
Barefoot Best for Running?
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Simple Holistic Approach to Fight the Common Cold
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Wood Fires Can Harm the Youngest Lungs
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Using the Mind to Heal the Heart
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
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Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma

TUESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- A substance secreted by eczema-damaged skin might trigger asthma in children, U.S. researchers suggest.

The theory comes from a study of mice with an eczema-like condition, which suggested that early treatment of eczema and inhibition of the trigger substance might help prevent asthma.

An estimated 50 percent to 70 percent of children with severe eczema, known as atopic dermatitis, develop asthma, compared with about 9 percent of children in the general population. In the United States, about 17 percent of children have eczema, although not all cases are severe.

The progression from eczema to asthma is called the atopic march.

"Over the years, the clinical community has struggled to explain atopic march," Raphael Kopan, a professor of developmental biology and dermatology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and an author of the study, said in a news release from the school.

"So, when we found that the skin of mice with an eczema-like condition produced a substance previously implicated in asthma, we decided to investigate further," Kopan said. "We found that the mice also suffered from asthma-like responses to inhaled allergens, implicating the substance, called TSLP, as the link between eczema and asthma."

The researchers found that TSLP (thylmic stromal lymphopoietin) is secreted by damaged skin to alert the body that the skin's protective barrier has failed. TSLP activates an immune response that fights invaders.

"We are excited, because we've narrowed down the problem of atopic march to one molecule," Kopan said. "We've shown that skin can act as a signaling organ and drive allergic inflammation in the lung by releasing TSLP. Now, it will be important to address how to prevent defective skin from producing TSLP."

"If that can be done," she said, "the link between eczema and asthma could be broken."

The study appears May 19 in the journal PLoS Biology.

More information

The American Academy of Dermatology has more about eczema.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, news release, May 18, 2009

Last Updated: May 19, 2009

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