ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
Human Ancestors Put Best Foot Forward 1.5M Years Ago
Rheumatoid Arthritis Hits Women Harder
CANCER
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Seaweed May Help Treat Lymphoma
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
CAREGIVING
Bariatric Surgery Centers Don't Deliver Better Outcomes
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
Omega-3 Fatty Acid May Help 'Preemie' Girls' Brains
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
DIABETES
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DIET, NUTRITION
Eat Light - Live Longer
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
Climate Change Linked to Longer Pollen Seasons
Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes
EYE CARE, VISION
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Be Healthy, Spend Less
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Heart Disease
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
SENIORS
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Add your Article

Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks

Children of women who gain too much weight during pregnancy tend to be more overweight and develop more risk factors for heart disease, new research indicates.

The results of the study, which the researchers claim is the most detailed one of its kind, are based on data from women of various pre-pregnancy weights and their children up to the age of 9 years.

"I suspect that a lot of women feel that pregnancy is a time that they should eat much more and can eat more," lead author Debbie Lawlor, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom, said in a news release. "More studies are needed that look at the whole picture to see if there is an optimal weight that will not increase the risk of low birth weight babies and not increase the risk of negative outcomes in the mother and baby at the time of birth and later in their lives."

The report, published in the June 1 issue of Circulation, concerns women who gain in excess of the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) guidelines for pregnancy weight. For women of normal weight, that means ideal gains of between 25 and 35 pounds, whereas for overweight women the ideal gain range is from 15 to 25 pounds.

Underweight women are recommended to gain 28 to 40 pounds and for obese women the recommendation is 11 to 20 pounds. The pre-pregnancy weight categories are based on the body mass index (BMI) scale, which takes into consideration both height and weight.

For the current analysis, the British research team began tracking about 6,700 women, nearly all of whom were white, and their offspring for a nine-year period, starting in 1991.

In addition to maternal weight gain during pregnancy, child body measurements and blood pressure readings were repeatedly collected over the study period.

Lawlor and her colleagues found that relative to children of mothers who stuck close to IOM guidelines, mothers who gained too much had children with greater BMIs of just over 2 pounds, nearly an inch larger waist size, more than 2 pounds of additional body fat, higher blood pressure, higher markers of inflammation in the blood, and lower levels of "good" cholesterol.

Such increases were most evident among children whose mothers had gained over one pound per week following the first trimester, the researchers noted.

"Our results show that in trying to work out what the ideal weight gain in pregnancy should be, we need to consider later outcomes in the offspring as well as outcomes around the time of birth," said Lawlor. "But, I believe we are still a long way from being absolutely clear what the optimal weight gain in pregnancy is for the best outcomes in the short- and long term for both mother and child."

SOURCES: American Heart Association, news release, June 1, 2010 Published on: June 01, 2010