ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
CANCER
Yoga Eases Sleep Problems Among Cancer Survivors
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
CAREGIVING
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
Timing May Matter in Organ Donation Decisions
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Holistic Dentistry-My View
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
DIET, NUTRITION
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Coffee or Tea Consumption May Lower Stroke Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pesticides Linked to Parkinson's
Vitamin D Deficit May Trigger MS Risk Gene
Fertilizer Ban Makes a Difference
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
FITNESS
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Healthy Living Adds Years to Life
Why Am I So Tired? Could It Be Low Thyroid?
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
Psychiatric Drugs Might Raise Cardiac Death Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Frequent Feedings May Be Making Babies Fat
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
MENTAL HEALTH
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimerís
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
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Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers who breast-feed are less likely to neglect their children, Australian researchers report.

In their study, the scientists followed 7,223 Australian women and their children for 15 years and found that the longer a mother breast-fed her child, the lower the risk of neglect.

Mothers who breast-fed for less than four months were twice as likely to neglect their children as those who breast-fed four months or more. Women who didn't breast-feed were 3.8 times more likely to neglect their children as mothers who breast-fed for at least four months.

Even after they adjusted for other factors, such as socioeconomic status, substance abuse and depression, the researchers found a strong association between breast-feeding and motherly care.

The findings were published in the February issue of Pediatrics.

Previous research has suggested how breast-feeding may help form a strong mother-infant bond, study senior author Dr. Lane Strathearn, an assistant professor of pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital, said in a Baylor news release.

"Oxytocin is a critical hormone produced during breast-feeding that promotes and reinforces maternal behavior. Animal studies have shown that this hormone is critical for the initiation of maternal behaviors in animals," Strathearn said. "It may be that breast-feeding stimulates oxytocin production in the brain, helping to develop the attachment relationship of the mother and her baby. Or the factors that help shape the development of the oxytocin system in the brain may predispose to successful breast-feeding and nurturance of the baby."

"Promoting breast-feeding may be a simple and cost-effective way to strengthen the mother-infant relationship. Providing the economic and social support for new mothers to stay at home with their babies may help accomplish this goal. The simple fact that women have such limited maternity leave inhibits them from strengthening this relationship," Strathearn said.

"Maternal neglect represents a fundamental breakdown in the relationship between a mother and her child, as the mom fails to provide the physical and emotional caregiving that an infant requires for optimal development. Breast-feeding may be a natural way to support the mother-infant relationship, reducing the risk of neglect in the long term."

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development has more about breast-feeding.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Baylor College of Medicine, news release, Jan. 26, 2009

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2009

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