ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
CANCER
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
Get to Know the Pap Test
CAREGIVING
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
DIET, NUTRITION
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
Oregano Shown to be the Most Powerful Culinary Herb
Quick Weight Loss May Be Best for Long-Term Success
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Improved Fungicides May Be Easier on Environment
Preparing for a Chlorine Gas Disaster
Gene Explains How High-Fructose Diets Lead to Insulin Resistance
EYE CARE, VISION
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
FITNESS
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
Run for Your Life
Be Healthy, Spend Less
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Sun, Smoke, Extra Weight Add Years to Skin
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Man Dies of Brain Inflammation Caused by Deer Tick Virus
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
St. John's Wort Doesn't Work for ADHD
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
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Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers who breast-feed are less likely to neglect their children, Australian researchers report.

In their study, the scientists followed 7,223 Australian women and their children for 15 years and found that the longer a mother breast-fed her child, the lower the risk of neglect.

Mothers who breast-fed for less than four months were twice as likely to neglect their children as those who breast-fed four months or more. Women who didn't breast-feed were 3.8 times more likely to neglect their children as mothers who breast-fed for at least four months.

Even after they adjusted for other factors, such as socioeconomic status, substance abuse and depression, the researchers found a strong association between breast-feeding and motherly care.

The findings were published in the February issue of Pediatrics.

Previous research has suggested how breast-feeding may help form a strong mother-infant bond, study senior author Dr. Lane Strathearn, an assistant professor of pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital, said in a Baylor news release.

"Oxytocin is a critical hormone produced during breast-feeding that promotes and reinforces maternal behavior. Animal studies have shown that this hormone is critical for the initiation of maternal behaviors in animals," Strathearn said. "It may be that breast-feeding stimulates oxytocin production in the brain, helping to develop the attachment relationship of the mother and her baby. Or the factors that help shape the development of the oxytocin system in the brain may predispose to successful breast-feeding and nurturance of the baby."

"Promoting breast-feeding may be a simple and cost-effective way to strengthen the mother-infant relationship. Providing the economic and social support for new mothers to stay at home with their babies may help accomplish this goal. The simple fact that women have such limited maternity leave inhibits them from strengthening this relationship," Strathearn said.

"Maternal neglect represents a fundamental breakdown in the relationship between a mother and her child, as the mom fails to provide the physical and emotional caregiving that an infant requires for optimal development. Breast-feeding may be a natural way to support the mother-infant relationship, reducing the risk of neglect in the long term."

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development has more about breast-feeding.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Baylor College of Medicine, news release, Jan. 26, 2009

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2009

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