ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Tequila Plant May Help Fight Bone Loss
For All Their Plusses, Pets Pose a Risk for Falls, Too
Many Americans Fall Short on Their Vitamin D
CANCER
Meditation May Reduce Stress in Breast Cancer Patients
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
Gene Screen May Predict Colon Cancer's Return
CAREGIVING
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
3 Steps Might Help Stop MRSA's Spread
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
DIABETES
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Leafy Greens Top Risky Food List
Oregano Shown to be the Most Powerful Culinary Herb
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes
EYE CARE, VISION
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
FITNESS
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Football Can Shrink Players
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Kids More Apt to Smoke If Mom Did While Pregnant
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Any Old Cane Won't Do
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
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Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers who breast-feed are less likely to neglect their children, Australian researchers report.

In their study, the scientists followed 7,223 Australian women and their children for 15 years and found that the longer a mother breast-fed her child, the lower the risk of neglect.

Mothers who breast-fed for less than four months were twice as likely to neglect their children as those who breast-fed four months or more. Women who didn't breast-feed were 3.8 times more likely to neglect their children as mothers who breast-fed for at least four months.

Even after they adjusted for other factors, such as socioeconomic status, substance abuse and depression, the researchers found a strong association between breast-feeding and motherly care.

The findings were published in the February issue of Pediatrics.

Previous research has suggested how breast-feeding may help form a strong mother-infant bond, study senior author Dr. Lane Strathearn, an assistant professor of pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital, said in a Baylor news release.

"Oxytocin is a critical hormone produced during breast-feeding that promotes and reinforces maternal behavior. Animal studies have shown that this hormone is critical for the initiation of maternal behaviors in animals," Strathearn said. "It may be that breast-feeding stimulates oxytocin production in the brain, helping to develop the attachment relationship of the mother and her baby. Or the factors that help shape the development of the oxytocin system in the brain may predispose to successful breast-feeding and nurturance of the baby."

"Promoting breast-feeding may be a simple and cost-effective way to strengthen the mother-infant relationship. Providing the economic and social support for new mothers to stay at home with their babies may help accomplish this goal. The simple fact that women have such limited maternity leave inhibits them from strengthening this relationship," Strathearn said.

"Maternal neglect represents a fundamental breakdown in the relationship between a mother and her child, as the mom fails to provide the physical and emotional caregiving that an infant requires for optimal development. Breast-feeding may be a natural way to support the mother-infant relationship, reducing the risk of neglect in the long term."

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development has more about breast-feeding.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Baylor College of Medicine, news release, Jan. 26, 2009

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2009

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