ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
CANCER
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
CAREGIVING
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
U.S. Mental Health Spending Rises, But Many Still Left Out
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
DIABETES
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Eating in America Still Unhealthy
Olive Oil May Be Key to Mediterranean Diet's Benefits
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat
Accumulated Lead May Affect Older Women's Brains
Small Doses of Carbon Monoxide Might Help Stroke Victims
EYE CARE, VISION
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
FITNESS
Avoiding a Holiday Season of Discontent
Barefoot Best for Running?
Almost Two-Thirds of Americans Meet Exercise Guidelines
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
When Clocks Change, Body May Need Time to Adjust
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Protect Your Kids From Swine Flu While at Camp
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Drink Away Dementia?
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Add your Article

Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- People who are wealthy and educated appear to have a better chance of living a longer and healthier life.

Researchers from the British Economic & Social Research Council, who analyzed data from 2002 to 2007, found that that wealthier people lived longer, and those who were richer and better educated were less likely to have depression, high-blood pressure or diabetes or to be obese.

The gap in health and life expectancy caused by socioeconomic status was obvious in all age groups, but it was most pronounced among those in their 50s and 60s.

"Increases in life expectancy raise major challenges for public policy," study leader James Nazroo, a professor in the University of Manchester's sociology department, said in a news release from the council. "Among these is the need to respond to marked inequalities in economic position and life expectancy at older ages."

The researchers also found the retiring early was generally good for one's health -- unless the person had been forced to stop working because of health or economic reasons. Forced retirees were shown to have poorer mental health than others who retired early or at a normal retirement age.

However, seniors who did volunteer work, cared for others or took part in similar non-work activities tended to have a better mental and physical life, as long as they felt their work was been recognized.

"Despite the fact that we are all living longer, many people now stop work before the statutory retirement age, and a large proportion of these still have the potential to provide a positive input into society, the economy and their own well-being," Nazroo said. "Our findings will help us understand how society can help people realize this potential."

More information

The AARP has more about healthy living for older adults.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Economic & Social Research Council, news release, May 7, 2009

Last Updated: May 18, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com