ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Vitamin K Doesn't Slow Bone Loss
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
CANCER
Herb May Counter Liver Damage From Chemo
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
CAREGIVING
U.S. Mental Health Spending Rises, But Many Still Left Out
Caregiving May Lengthen Life
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DIET, NUTRITION
Milk Destroys Antioxidant Benefits in Blueberries
Vinegar Might Help Keep Off Pounds
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Skin Woes Take Toll on U.S. Combat Troops
Golf Course Insecticides Pose Little Danger to Players
Pollution Particles Impair Blood Vessel Function
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
FITNESS
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Less Education May Mean Poorer Health
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
Be Healthy, Spend Less
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Omega-3, Some Omega-6 Fatty Acids Boost Cardiovascular Health
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
Treat Kids to a Safe Halloween
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Add your Article

Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- People who are wealthy and educated appear to have a better chance of living a longer and healthier life.

Researchers from the British Economic & Social Research Council, who analyzed data from 2002 to 2007, found that that wealthier people lived longer, and those who were richer and better educated were less likely to have depression, high-blood pressure or diabetes or to be obese.

The gap in health and life expectancy caused by socioeconomic status was obvious in all age groups, but it was most pronounced among those in their 50s and 60s.

"Increases in life expectancy raise major challenges for public policy," study leader James Nazroo, a professor in the University of Manchester's sociology department, said in a news release from the council. "Among these is the need to respond to marked inequalities in economic position and life expectancy at older ages."

The researchers also found the retiring early was generally good for one's health -- unless the person had been forced to stop working because of health or economic reasons. Forced retirees were shown to have poorer mental health than others who retired early or at a normal retirement age.

However, seniors who did volunteer work, cared for others or took part in similar non-work activities tended to have a better mental and physical life, as long as they felt their work was been recognized.

"Despite the fact that we are all living longer, many people now stop work before the statutory retirement age, and a large proportion of these still have the potential to provide a positive input into society, the economy and their own well-being," Nazroo said. "Our findings will help us understand how society can help people realize this potential."

More information

The AARP has more about healthy living for older adults.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Economic & Social Research Council, news release, May 7, 2009

Last Updated: May 18, 2009

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