ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
CANCER
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
For Dialysis Patients, More Pills = Lower Quality of Life
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Health Tip: After Liposuction
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
DIABETES
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
DIET, NUTRITION
Low Vitamin A, C Intake Tied to Asthma Risk
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Vitamin D Vital for the Heart
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Hurricane Threats: Time to Batten Down the Hatches
Gene Explains How High-Fructose Diets Lead to Insulin Resistance
Seasons Arriving 2 Days Earlier, Study Says
EYE CARE, VISION
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
FITNESS
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers
Protect Your Kids From Swine Flu While at Camp
St. John's Wort Doesn't Work for ADHD
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
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More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life

MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- A 65-year-long study finds that people who took in lots of calcium and dairy products as children tended to avoid stroke and live longer than those who didn't.

"This study shows a modest protective effect of dietary calcium intake in childhood against stroke risk later in life, and a modest protective effect against mortality from any cause from higher intake of milk in childhood," said Dr. David L. Katz, director of the Prevention Research Center at Yale University School of Medicine. He was not involved in the study, which was published in the July 28 online edition of Heart.

Risk factors for heart disease start in childhood, but there is little evidence of the effect dairy foods have on these risks. Some dairy products, such as whole milk, butter and cheese, have a lot of saturated fat and cholesterol. Studies have also shown that eating these foods in adulthood contributes to heart disease, researchers say.

For the study, a research team led by Jolieke van der Pols from the Queensland Institute of Medical Research in Brisbane, Australia, collected data on children from 1,343 families in England and Scotland. All of the families took part in a survey of diet and health conducted in Britain from 1937 to 1939.

The researchers were able to track the adult health of 4,374 of the children between 1948 and 2005. By 2005, 1,468 of these individuals had died, including 378 who succumbed to heart disease and 121 who died from stroke.

The researchers looked at two main outcomes: deaths from stroke and cardiovascular disease. They looked at the associations between dairy intake and mortality and the associations between individual dairy foods and mortality.

They found no clear evidence that dairy products were tied to either coronary heart disease or stroke deaths.

However, children in the group with the highest intake of calcium and dairy products had lower overall death rates than those who ate less dairy.

"Children whose family diet in the 1930s was high in calcium were at reduced risk of death from stroke. Furthermore, childhood diets rich in dairy or calcium were associated with lower all-cause mortality in adulthood," the researchers concluded.

But there is only so much we can learn from this observational study, Katz said.

"Dietary assessments were [done] in Britain before WWII, at which time low-fat and fat-free milk were all but nonexistent," Katz said "Thus, any benefits of dairy intake were likely mitigated by its high content of saturated fat."

Furthermore, "dairy intake was higher in households with higher socioeconomic status, which may itself account for a health benefit," he noted.

Studies using the American Heart Association-recommended DASH (dietary approaches to stop hypertension) diet suggest there are health benefits from dairy intake, Katz said. But, "there are some concerns as well, such as a potential association [of high dairy intake] with increased risk of prostate cancer. Unfortunately, I don't think we can find a resolution to the persistent controversies about dairy foods from the current study."

Another expert, Dr. David J.A. Jenkins, a professor in the department of nutritional sciences at the University of Toronto, noted that those who ate the most dairy also ate the most fruit and vegetables, so they had the healthiest diets overall.

"To put it all down to increased dairy products in young life seems to be a marker for those who had a more reasonable diet," he said. "If you have good nutrition in childhood it is important for longevity, but I would be wary about saying this was due to milk consumption," he said.

Another expert advocated dairy products for kids, but suggested sticking to low- or non-fat products.

"The saturated fat in dairy food is what we are concerned about, not so much the calories," said Samantha Heller, a Connecticut-based registered dietitian, clinical nutritionist and exercise physiologist. "A lot of times kids are not getting the calcium they need because they are replacing calcium-rich beverages with sugar-sweetened beverages, which have no nutritional value," she said.