ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Cane Use May Cut Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis
CANCER
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering
CAREGIVING
Caregiving May Lengthen Life
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
DIABETES
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Preparing for a Chlorine Gas Disaster
Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
EYE CARE, VISION
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
FITNESS
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Study Supports Swine Flu's Pandemic Potential
Can a Bad Boss Make You Sick?
Eating More Soy May Be Good For Your Lung Function
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Add your Article

More Educated Choose Healthier Foods, But Pay More

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- People with higher levels of education and income tend to eat healthier diets, but pay more for selecting foods that are less energy-dense (lower calorie/higher nutrient content), a U.S. study finds.

Less energy-dense diets are associated with lower rates of obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some forms of cancer. Improving diet quality by lowering energy density is standard advice for weight control, cancer prevention and better health, according to the University of Washington researchers.

Their study included 164 adults in the Seattle area who recorded their usual frequency of consumption of 152 foods and 22 beverages, along with portion sizes. They also provided four-day dietary records and completed demographic and behavioral questionnaires.

The researchers found that higher dietary energy density was associated with higher intakes of total fat and saturated fat and lower intakes of dietary fiber, potassium and vitamins A and C. Daily diet cost was $6.72 per day for men and $6.21 per day for women, which reflects the fact that the men ate more than the women. But women spent $8.12 for each 2,000 kcal of dietary energy, compared with $7.43 for men.

Diets with lower energy density and higher nutrient content were more costly than those with higher energy density and lower nutrient content. Higher quality diets were associated with higher household levels of education and income. Education was a more dominant factor than income.

"The findings that higher-quality diets were consumed by women of higher [socioeconomic status] and more costly per 2,000 kcal has implications for epidemiologic studies of diet and chronic disease," concluded study authors Pablo Monsivais and Adam Drewnowski.

"Nutritional epidemiology has historically been based on the premise that nutrient exposures are directly linked to health outcomes. However, nutritional status is also intimately linked to socioeconomic status, and the findings reported here raise the possibility that the higher monetary cost of nutritious diets may provide one explanation for these observations. Future studies, based on more representative samples, will be needed to elucidate the connections between diet quality and diet cost across socioeconomic strata," they wrote.

The study appears in the May issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

More information

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration explains how to read food nutrition labels.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Journal of the American Dietetic Association, news release, May 1, 2009

Last Updated: May 01, 2009

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