ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
Drinking Cuts Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
CANCER
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Seaweed May Help Treat Lymphoma
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
CAREGIVING
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
DIET, NUTRITION
Probiotics Are The Good Guys
Just Say No to Nuts During Pregnancy
5 Reasons why you could gain weight while dieting
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Arsenic in Drinking Water Raises Diabetes Risk
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
Population-Based Strategy Urged to Cut U.S. Obesity Rate
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
FITNESS
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Exercise Guards White Blood Cells Against Aging
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Can You Talk Your Way to Happy?
Lower Vitamin D Levels in Blacks May Up Heart Risks
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Ginkgo Won't Prevent Heart Attack, Stroke in Elderly
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Using the Mind to Heal the Heart
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Add your Article

More Educated Choose Healthier Foods, But Pay More

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- People with higher levels of education and income tend to eat healthier diets, but pay more for selecting foods that are less energy-dense (lower calorie/higher nutrient content), a U.S. study finds.

Less energy-dense diets are associated with lower rates of obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some forms of cancer. Improving diet quality by lowering energy density is standard advice for weight control, cancer prevention and better health, according to the University of Washington researchers.

Their study included 164 adults in the Seattle area who recorded their usual frequency of consumption of 152 foods and 22 beverages, along with portion sizes. They also provided four-day dietary records and completed demographic and behavioral questionnaires.

The researchers found that higher dietary energy density was associated with higher intakes of total fat and saturated fat and lower intakes of dietary fiber, potassium and vitamins A and C. Daily diet cost was $6.72 per day for men and $6.21 per day for women, which reflects the fact that the men ate more than the women. But women spent $8.12 for each 2,000 kcal of dietary energy, compared with $7.43 for men.

Diets with lower energy density and higher nutrient content were more costly than those with higher energy density and lower nutrient content. Higher quality diets were associated with higher household levels of education and income. Education was a more dominant factor than income.

"The findings that higher-quality diets were consumed by women of higher [socioeconomic status] and more costly per 2,000 kcal has implications for epidemiologic studies of diet and chronic disease," concluded study authors Pablo Monsivais and Adam Drewnowski.

"Nutritional epidemiology has historically been based on the premise that nutrient exposures are directly linked to health outcomes. However, nutritional status is also intimately linked to socioeconomic status, and the findings reported here raise the possibility that the higher monetary cost of nutritious diets may provide one explanation for these observations. Future studies, based on more representative samples, will be needed to elucidate the connections between diet quality and diet cost across socioeconomic strata," they wrote.

The study appears in the May issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

More information

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration explains how to read food nutrition labels.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Journal of the American Dietetic Association, news release, May 1, 2009

Last Updated: May 01, 2009

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