ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
CANCER
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Herb May Counter Liver Damage From Chemo
Minorities Distrust Medical System More
CAREGIVING
Reduce Suffering, Urge Heart Failure Patients and Caregivers
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
DIABETES
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
DIET, NUTRITION
Mediterranean Diet May Help Prevent Depression
5 Reasons why you could gain weight while dieting
Milk Destroys Antioxidant Benefits in Blueberries
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Vest Monitors 'Individual' Air Pollution
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Freckles, Moles May Indicate Risk for Eye Cancer
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
FITNESS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
Weak Muscles May Cause 'Runner's Knee'
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Spread of Swine Flu in Japan Could Raise WHO Alert to Highest Level
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
SENIORS
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Add your Article

More Educated Choose Healthier Foods, But Pay More

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- People with higher levels of education and income tend to eat healthier diets, but pay more for selecting foods that are less energy-dense (lower calorie/higher nutrient content), a U.S. study finds.

Less energy-dense diets are associated with lower rates of obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some forms of cancer. Improving diet quality by lowering energy density is standard advice for weight control, cancer prevention and better health, according to the University of Washington researchers.

Their study included 164 adults in the Seattle area who recorded their usual frequency of consumption of 152 foods and 22 beverages, along with portion sizes. They also provided four-day dietary records and completed demographic and behavioral questionnaires.

The researchers found that higher dietary energy density was associated with higher intakes of total fat and saturated fat and lower intakes of dietary fiber, potassium and vitamins A and C. Daily diet cost was $6.72 per day for men and $6.21 per day for women, which reflects the fact that the men ate more than the women. But women spent $8.12 for each 2,000 kcal of dietary energy, compared with $7.43 for men.

Diets with lower energy density and higher nutrient content were more costly than those with higher energy density and lower nutrient content. Higher quality diets were associated with higher household levels of education and income. Education was a more dominant factor than income.

"The findings that higher-quality diets were consumed by women of higher [socioeconomic status] and more costly per 2,000 kcal has implications for epidemiologic studies of diet and chronic disease," concluded study authors Pablo Monsivais and Adam Drewnowski.

"Nutritional epidemiology has historically been based on the premise that nutrient exposures are directly linked to health outcomes. However, nutritional status is also intimately linked to socioeconomic status, and the findings reported here raise the possibility that the higher monetary cost of nutritious diets may provide one explanation for these observations. Future studies, based on more representative samples, will be needed to elucidate the connections between diet quality and diet cost across socioeconomic strata," they wrote.

The study appears in the May issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

More information

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration explains how to read food nutrition labels.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Journal of the American Dietetic Association, news release, May 1, 2009

Last Updated: May 01, 2009

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