ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Family History Key Player in Brain Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Rapid Infant Weight Gain Linked to Childhood Obesity
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
Recession Scrambling Health Spending in U.S.
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
DIABETES
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
DIET, NUTRITION
Oregano Shown to be the Most Powerful Culinary Herb
Fruit Even Healthier Than Thought: Study Shows
Trans Fat Labeling Gets Tricky
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Genetics, Environment Shape Sexual Behavior
Radiation Exposure Linked to Aggressive Thyroid Cancers
Smog Standards Need Tightening, Activists Say
EYE CARE, VISION
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
FITNESS
Barefoot Best for Running?
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Deployment Takes Toll on Army Wives
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Treat Kids to a Safe Halloween
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Drink Away Dementia?
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
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More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout

MONDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Consuming more vitamin C may help reduce a man's risk of gout, according to researchers who studied almost 47,000 men over a 20-year span.

During that time, more than 1,300 of the men developed gout. Compared with those whose vitamin C intake through food and supplements was less than 250 milligrams a day, the risk for gout was 17 percent lower among men with a daily intake of 500 to 999 milligrams, 34 percent lower for those who took in 1,000 to 1,499 milligrams, and 45 percent lower with a daily intake of 1,500 milligrams or more.

For every 500 mg increase in vitamin C intake, the risk for gout fell 17 percent, the researchers calculated.

Risks were similar when comparing men who did and did not take supplements. Those who took 1,000 to 1,499 supplemental milligrams a day had a 34 percent lower risk of gout than men who did not take vitamin C supplements. The risk was 45 percent lower with 1,500 supplemental milligrams daily.

The researchers said it appears that vitamin C reduces levels of uric acid, which can form crystal deposits that cause the pain, inflammation and swelling associated with gout. Vitamin C may affect reabsorption of uric acid by the kidneys, increase the speed at which the kidneys work or protect against inflammation, all of which might reduce the likelihood of developing gout.

The study is published in the March 9 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

"Given the general safety profile associated with vitamin C intake, particularly in the generally consumed ranges as in the present study (e.g. tolerable upper intake level of vitamin C of less than 2,000 milligrams in adults, according to the Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine), vitamin C intake may provide a useful option in the prevention of gout," wrote Dr. Hyon K. Choi, who was with the University of British Columbia when the study was conducted and is now with the Boston University School of Medicine.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about gout.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, March 9, 2009

Last Updated: March 09, 2009

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