ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
CANCER
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
CAREGIVING
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
MRSA Infections Spreading to Kids in Community
Timing May Matter in Organ Donation Decisions
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
DIABETES
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
Oregano Shown to be the Most Powerful Culinary Herb
Milk Destroys Antioxidant Benefits in Blueberries
Purple Tomato Extended Lives of Cancer-Prone Mice
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Chemicals in Carpets, Non-Stick Pans Tied to Thyroid Disease
Household Chemicals May Affect Cholesterol Levels
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
EYE CARE, VISION
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
FITNESS
Maximize Your Run
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
New Methods Could Speed Production of Flu Vaccines
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Using the Mind to Heal the Heart
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
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More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout

MONDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Consuming more vitamin C may help reduce a man's risk of gout, according to researchers who studied almost 47,000 men over a 20-year span.

During that time, more than 1,300 of the men developed gout. Compared with those whose vitamin C intake through food and supplements was less than 250 milligrams a day, the risk for gout was 17 percent lower among men with a daily intake of 500 to 999 milligrams, 34 percent lower for those who took in 1,000 to 1,499 milligrams, and 45 percent lower with a daily intake of 1,500 milligrams or more.

For every 500 mg increase in vitamin C intake, the risk for gout fell 17 percent, the researchers calculated.

Risks were similar when comparing men who did and did not take supplements. Those who took 1,000 to 1,499 supplemental milligrams a day had a 34 percent lower risk of gout than men who did not take vitamin C supplements. The risk was 45 percent lower with 1,500 supplemental milligrams daily.

The researchers said it appears that vitamin C reduces levels of uric acid, which can form crystal deposits that cause the pain, inflammation and swelling associated with gout. Vitamin C may affect reabsorption of uric acid by the kidneys, increase the speed at which the kidneys work or protect against inflammation, all of which might reduce the likelihood of developing gout.

The study is published in the March 9 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

"Given the general safety profile associated with vitamin C intake, particularly in the generally consumed ranges as in the present study (e.g. tolerable upper intake level of vitamin C of less than 2,000 milligrams in adults, according to the Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine), vitamin C intake may provide a useful option in the prevention of gout," wrote Dr. Hyon K. Choi, who was with the University of British Columbia when the study was conducted and is now with the Boston University School of Medicine.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about gout.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, March 9, 2009

Last Updated: March 09, 2009

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