ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
Soccer's a Winner for Building Bone Health in Girls
CANCER
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
More Cancer Tests Mean More False-Positive Results
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
CAREGIVING
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
DIABETES
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Is Coffee Good or Bad for Your Health?
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
For Fitness, Cutting Calories May Not Be Enough
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Air Pollution May Cause Appendicitis: Study Reveals
Most Mt. Everest Deaths Occur Near Summit During Descent
Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat
EYE CARE, VISION
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
Antioxidant-Rich Diet May Protect Against Eye Disease
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
FITNESS
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Can You Talk Your Way to Happy?
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Keep Fire Safety in Mind as You Celebrate
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
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More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout

MONDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Consuming more vitamin C may help reduce a man's risk of gout, according to researchers who studied almost 47,000 men over a 20-year span.

During that time, more than 1,300 of the men developed gout. Compared with those whose vitamin C intake through food and supplements was less than 250 milligrams a day, the risk for gout was 17 percent lower among men with a daily intake of 500 to 999 milligrams, 34 percent lower for those who took in 1,000 to 1,499 milligrams, and 45 percent lower with a daily intake of 1,500 milligrams or more.

For every 500 mg increase in vitamin C intake, the risk for gout fell 17 percent, the researchers calculated.

Risks were similar when comparing men who did and did not take supplements. Those who took 1,000 to 1,499 supplemental milligrams a day had a 34 percent lower risk of gout than men who did not take vitamin C supplements. The risk was 45 percent lower with 1,500 supplemental milligrams daily.

The researchers said it appears that vitamin C reduces levels of uric acid, which can form crystal deposits that cause the pain, inflammation and swelling associated with gout. Vitamin C may affect reabsorption of uric acid by the kidneys, increase the speed at which the kidneys work or protect against inflammation, all of which might reduce the likelihood of developing gout.

The study is published in the March 9 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

"Given the general safety profile associated with vitamin C intake, particularly in the generally consumed ranges as in the present study (e.g. tolerable upper intake level of vitamin C of less than 2,000 milligrams in adults, according to the Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine), vitamin C intake may provide a useful option in the prevention of gout," wrote Dr. Hyon K. Choi, who was with the University of British Columbia when the study was conducted and is now with the Boston University School of Medicine.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about gout.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, March 9, 2009

Last Updated: March 09, 2009

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