ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Not Help Hot Flashes
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Varicose, Spider Veins May Be Inevitable for Some
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Human Ancestors Put Best Foot Forward 1.5M Years Ago
CANCER
Gene Studies Reveal Cancer's Secrets
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
DIET, NUTRITION
Antioxidant-Rich Foods Lose Nutritional Luster Over Time
Purple Tomato Extended Lives of Cancer-Prone Mice
Atkins Diet Tougher on Heart After Weight Loss
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gas Cooking Might Up Your Cancer Risk
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Seasons Arriving 2 Days Earlier, Study Says
EYE CARE, VISION
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
FITNESS
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Go To Work But Skip The Car
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Coffee Cuts Liver Scarring in Hepatitis C
Swine Flu May Pose Problems for Pregnant Women
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
SENIORS
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
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More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout

MONDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Consuming more vitamin C may help reduce a man's risk of gout, according to researchers who studied almost 47,000 men over a 20-year span.

During that time, more than 1,300 of the men developed gout. Compared with those whose vitamin C intake through food and supplements was less than 250 milligrams a day, the risk for gout was 17 percent lower among men with a daily intake of 500 to 999 milligrams, 34 percent lower for those who took in 1,000 to 1,499 milligrams, and 45 percent lower with a daily intake of 1,500 milligrams or more.

For every 500 mg increase in vitamin C intake, the risk for gout fell 17 percent, the researchers calculated.

Risks were similar when comparing men who did and did not take supplements. Those who took 1,000 to 1,499 supplemental milligrams a day had a 34 percent lower risk of gout than men who did not take vitamin C supplements. The risk was 45 percent lower with 1,500 supplemental milligrams daily.

The researchers said it appears that vitamin C reduces levels of uric acid, which can form crystal deposits that cause the pain, inflammation and swelling associated with gout. Vitamin C may affect reabsorption of uric acid by the kidneys, increase the speed at which the kidneys work or protect against inflammation, all of which might reduce the likelihood of developing gout.

The study is published in the March 9 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

"Given the general safety profile associated with vitamin C intake, particularly in the generally consumed ranges as in the present study (e.g. tolerable upper intake level of vitamin C of less than 2,000 milligrams in adults, according to the Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine), vitamin C intake may provide a useful option in the prevention of gout," wrote Dr. Hyon K. Choi, who was with the University of British Columbia when the study was conducted and is now with the Boston University School of Medicine.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about gout.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, March 9, 2009

Last Updated: March 09, 2009

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