ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Soccer's a Winner for Building Bone Health in Girls
Human Ancestors Put Best Foot Forward 1.5M Years Ago
Autumn Sees More Women With Bunion Problems
CANCER
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
DIABETES
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
DIET, NUTRITION
For Fitness, Cutting Calories May Not Be Enough
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Mediterranean Diet Helps Protect Aging Brain
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Genetics, Environment Shape Sexual Behavior
Gene Explains How High-Fructose Diets Lead to Insulin Resistance
Is It Safe to Go in the Gulf Coast's Water?
EYE CARE, VISION
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
FITNESS
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Eating More Soy May Be Good For Your Lung Function
FDA Bans Unapproved Prescription Cough, Cold and Allergy Meds
Simple Holistic Approach to Fight the Common Cold
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
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More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout

MONDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Consuming more vitamin C may help reduce a man's risk of gout, according to researchers who studied almost 47,000 men over a 20-year span.

During that time, more than 1,300 of the men developed gout. Compared with those whose vitamin C intake through food and supplements was less than 250 milligrams a day, the risk for gout was 17 percent lower among men with a daily intake of 500 to 999 milligrams, 34 percent lower for those who took in 1,000 to 1,499 milligrams, and 45 percent lower with a daily intake of 1,500 milligrams or more.

For every 500 mg increase in vitamin C intake, the risk for gout fell 17 percent, the researchers calculated.

Risks were similar when comparing men who did and did not take supplements. Those who took 1,000 to 1,499 supplemental milligrams a day had a 34 percent lower risk of gout than men who did not take vitamin C supplements. The risk was 45 percent lower with 1,500 supplemental milligrams daily.

The researchers said it appears that vitamin C reduces levels of uric acid, which can form crystal deposits that cause the pain, inflammation and swelling associated with gout. Vitamin C may affect reabsorption of uric acid by the kidneys, increase the speed at which the kidneys work or protect against inflammation, all of which might reduce the likelihood of developing gout.

The study is published in the March 9 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

"Given the general safety profile associated with vitamin C intake, particularly in the generally consumed ranges as in the present study (e.g. tolerable upper intake level of vitamin C of less than 2,000 milligrams in adults, according to the Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine), vitamin C intake may provide a useful option in the prevention of gout," wrote Dr. Hyon K. Choi, who was with the University of British Columbia when the study was conducted and is now with the Boston University School of Medicine.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about gout.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, March 9, 2009

Last Updated: March 09, 2009

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