ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
Fall Sports Peak Time for Lower Leg Damage
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
CANCER
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
CAREGIVING
Babies Born in High Pollen Months at Wheezing Risk
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
DIABETES
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
DIET, NUTRITION
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Is Your Refrigerator Getting Enough Attention For Your Raw Food Success?
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
Disinfectants Can Boost Bacteria's Resistance to Treatment
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
EYE CARE, VISION
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
FITNESS
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Food and Water Supply Poisoned by Perchlorate
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
When It Comes to Toys, Shop Smart, Shop Safe
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
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Most Kids With Type 1 Diabetes Lack Vitamin D

FRIDAY, Dec. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Almost 75 percent of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes have insufficient levels of vitamin D, researchers at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston report.

A deficit in vitamin D can lead to bone problems later in life, especially among those with type 1 diabetes. While vitamin D is usually gotten from exposure to sunlight or from the diet, researchers suggest that supplements are needed to boost vitamin D levels.

"We found in children with type 1 diabetes a pretty significant level of vitamin D insufficiency -- much more than we had expected to find," said lead researcher Dr. Britta Svoren, an instructor in pediatrics.

Diabetes is associated with a reduction in bone mineral density, which can make bones more fragile, Svoren noted. Vitamin D deficiency can increase the risk of fracture in these children later in life, she added. In addition, vitamin D may have a role in the risk for developing type 1 diabetes.

Moreover, many children throughout the world without type 1 diabetes have vitamin D deficiency, Svoren said.

The report was published in the January issue of The Journal of Pediatrics.

For the study, Svoren's team measured vitamin D levels in 128 children with type 1 diabetes. The children were between 1.5 and 17.5 years old.

The researchers found that 61 percent of the children had insufficient levels of vitamin D, and 15 percent had a deficiency in vitamin D, meaning their vitamin D levels were severely low.

In fact, only 24 percent of the children had sufficient vitamin D levels.

The lowest vitamin D levels were seen among the oldest children. Among adolescents, 85 percent had inadequate levels of the vitamin, Svoren noted.

"One of the things that might be going on is that, for a lot of children and adolescents, the primary source of vitamin D is through vitamin D-fortified milk," Svoren said. "The problem is that a lot of teenagers with type 1 diabetes, rather than drinking milk, a lot of these individuals are probably drinking increased amounts of sugar-free colas."

Svoren recommended that these patients take a multivitamin and at least 400 IU of vitamin D daily.

Dr. David L. Katz, director of the Prevention Research Center at Yale University School of Medicine, said that vitamin D is important for all children.

"A growing body of research suggests the importance of vitamin D in many aspects of health, far beyond the long-established role in bone development and preservation," Katz said. "But the role of vitamin D in bone health remains crucial, and perhaps that much more so in groups at high risk of bone-thinning and injury. Such groups include postmenopausal women, those with kidney disease, and children with type 1 diabetes."

Whether or not supplementing vitamin D would prevent all diabetes-related bone disease in diabetic children, the practice makes sense, particularly in light of a recent American Academy of Pediatrics recommendation doubling the intake of vitamin D for all children, Katz said.

"All children should get ample vitamin D, at least 400 IU daily, from some combination of sun exposure, dairy products, and/or supplements," Katz said. "Those at high risk of deficiency, but not all children, should have levels monitored."

-Steven Reinberg

More information

For more on type 1 diabetes, visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.



SOURCES: Britta Svoren, M.D., instructor, pediatrics, Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston; David L. Katz, M.D., M.P.H., director, Prevention Research Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn.; January 2009, The Journal of Pediatrics

Last Updated: Dec. 19, 2008

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