ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Barefoot Lifestyle Has Its Dangers
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
CANCER
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Vitamin D May Improve Melanoma Survival
CAREGIVING
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
DIABETES
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
Milk Destroys Antioxidant Benefits in Blueberries
Imagine Food Aromas That Prevent Overeating
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Cleaning House May Be Risky for Women With Asthma
Rainy Areas in U.S. Show Higher Autism Rates
EYE CARE, VISION
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
FITNESS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
Can You Talk Your Way to Happy?
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Quick Orthopedic Repair Can Save Young Shoulders
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Add your Article

Most Mt. Everest Deaths Occur Near Summit During Descent

THURSDAY, Dec. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Most deaths on Mount Everest occur during descents from the summit in the so-called "death zone" above 8,000 meters, and high-altitude cerebral edema appears to be associated with an increased risk of death.

That's the conclusion of researchers who analyzed the reported 212 deaths on the 29,000-foot mountain between 1921 and 2006.

The American, British and Canadian researchers found that the overall death rate for climbers and sherpas (locals hired to assist climbers) over those 86 years was 1.3 percent (1.6 percent among climbers and 1.1 percent among sherpas). Over the past 25 years, the death rate for climbers descending via the longer Tibetan northeast ridge was 3.4 percent, and 2.5 percent on the shorter Nepal route.

Excessive fatigue, a tendency to fall behind other climbers, and arriving at the summit later in the day were the factors most associated with risk of death, the study found. Many of those who died had symptoms such as confusion, a loss of physical coordination, and unconsciousness, all of which suggest high-altitude cerebral edema, a swelling of the brain caused by leakage of cerebral blood vessels.

Symptoms of high-altitude pulmonary edema (excessive fluid in the lungs) were rare among those who died on Everest. This surprised the researchers because high-altitude pulmonary edema is involved in most high-altitude-related deaths.

"We were also surprised at how few people died due to avalanches and ice falls in recent years... and that during descents, the mortality rate for climbers was six times that of sherpas," study leader Dr. Paul Firth, with the Massachusetts General Hospital department of anesthesia, said in a hospital news release.

The fact that fewer sherpas died during descents suggests that taking the time to acclimatize to high altitudes could improve climber survival. However, other factors may also be important, the study authors said.

"Most of the sherpas are born and live their lives at high altitudes, and the competitive process for expedition employment probably selects those who are best adapted to and most skilled for the work. So the ability of lowlanders to acclimate to these very high altitudes needs further investigation," Firth said.

The study was published Dec. 9 online issue of theBMJ.

More information

The MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia has more about acute altitude sickness.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Massachusetts General Hospital, news release, Dec. 9, 2008

Last Updated: Dec. 11, 2008

Copyright 2008 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com