Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Returning to the Road Tricky After Injury
Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones
Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years
Immune Therapy May Aid Kids With Neuroblastoma
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Flu Strikes a Milder Blow This Season
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Fatty Acid in Olive Oil Wards Off Hunger
Fruit Even Healthier Than Thought: Study Shows
Compound in Red Wine Fights Ravages of Age
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Artificial Light Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
Sunken, Unexploded Bombs Pose Cancer Risk
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
Antioxidant-Rich Diet May Protect Against Eye Disease
Exercise Guards White Blood Cells Against Aging
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Add your Article

Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 31 (HealthDay News) -- If you struggle with aches and pains that refuse to go away, you just might find relief from a long-practiced but relatively obscure alternative therapy called naprapathy.

Naprapathic medicine treats connective-tissue pain by using hands-on manipulation, nutritional counseling and, sometimes, therapeutic "modalities," such as heat, ultrasound, or cold laser therapy. Connective tissue, which includes ligaments, tendons and muscle, is the material inside the body that supports many of its parts.

"Naprapathy is hands-on connective tissue manipulation therapy, plus nutritional counseling," said Dr. Paul Maguire, president of the National College of Naprapathic Medicine in Chicago.

"It's noninvasive, so there's no downside to it, and it's a feel-good type of treatment that gets results," he said. Plus, it's a treatment that's been around for a long time, he added, noting that his school is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year.

"Naprapathy is a gentle system of manipulation that can relieve the pinching of areas causing restriction to nerves," Maguire explained.

Conditions that may be helped by naprapathy include carpal tunnel syndrome, back pain, headaches, neck pain, knee strain, sciatica, shoulder pain and tennis elbow, according to Maguire.

A recent study published in The Clinical Journal of Pain that included more than 400 people with back or neck pain found that those treated with naprapathic medicine were more likely to have symptom relief and less disability. Compared to standard medical advice, including recommendations for coping with pain and staying active, treatment with naprapathic medicine was 27 percent more likely to cause a reduction in pain and 18 percent more likely to cause a reduction in the risk of disability, the study found.

Overall, those who underwent naprapathic treatments were 44 percent more likely to perceive that they were recovered than those in the standard group, according to the study.

Naprapathic practitioners are currently licensed in just two states -- Illinois and New Mexico. Maguire said many practitioners become licensed in those states and then practice in others, sometimes obtaining other licenses, such as massage-therapy licenses, in their own states.

"This therapy is on the fringe of medical treatment and seems to be picking up pieces that other modalities have left behind," said Dr. Gerard Varlotta, director of sports rehabilitation at New York University Langone Medical Center's Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine/Hospital for Joint Disease in New York City.

Manual manipulation of connective tissue could be useful for conditions such as fibromyalgia, some rheumatological disorders, and in sports medicine, he said.

But Varlotta offered certain cautions.

"Make sure the practitioner is educated, and that what they say makes sense," he said. "If they promise to cure cancer, that's not what they're going to be doing. But, if you have realistic expectations, that they'll try to free up areas that have become restricted over time, that's reasonable."

Maguire said many preferred provider organizations (PPOs) will pay for naprapathy, although Medicare/Medicaid does not, unless it's specifically prescribed by a doctor.

-Serena Gordon

More information

To learn more about naprapathic medicine, visit the National College of Naprapathic Medicine.

SOURCES: Paul Maguire, D.N., president, National College of Naprapathic Medicine, Chicago; Gerard Varlotta, D.O., director, sports rehabilitation, New York University Langone Medical Centers Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine/Hospital for Joint Disease, and clinical associate professor, New York University School of Medicine, New York City; June 2007, The Clinical Journal of Pain

Last Updated: Dec. 31, 2008

Copyright © 2008 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

Licensed by