ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
CANCER
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Multiple Screening Strategy Boosts Cervical Cancer Detection
CAREGIVING
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
DIABETES
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
TV Food Ads Promote Bad Diets
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Staying Slim Is Good for the Environment
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
Short-Term Air Pollution Exposure May Damage DNA
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
FITNESS
Exercise 30 Minutes a Day? Who Knew!
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Want Sun Protection? Wear Red or Blue
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
Ginkgo Won't Prevent Heart Attack, Stroke in Elderly
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
Protect Your Kids From Swine Flu While at Camp
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Add your Article

Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry

THURSDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers who delivered their babies vaginally appear to be much more sensitive to the cry of their own child within a few weeks of the birth compared with those who deliver by Caesarean section, a new study shows.

The finding, published in The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, give researchers insight into why postpartum depression seems to be linked more often to Caesarean birth.

The researchers based their findings on MRI scans that show heightened activity in the sections of the brain thought to regulate emotions, motivation and habitual behaviors. They believe this may be because vaginal childbirth involves the release of oxytocin -- a key mediator of maternal behavior in animals -- from the posterior pituitary, uterine contractions and vagino-cervical stimulation.

The researchers also studied areas of the brain affected by delivery conditions and found ties between brain activity and measures of mood. This suggests that some of the same brain regions may help regulate postpartum mood.

"As more women opt to wait until they are older to have children, and by association be more likely to have a Caesarean-section delivery, these results are important, because they could provide better understanding of the basic neurophysiology and psychology of parent-infant attachment," lead author James Swain, of Yale University's Child Study Centre, said in a news release issued by the journal's publisher. "This work could lead to early detection of families at risk for postpartum depression and attachment problems and form a model for testing interventions."

Caesarean delivery, which occurs via incisions in the abdominal and uterine wall, is required at times to protect the health or survival of infant or mother. The procedure's use has increased in the United States dramatically, from 4.5 percent of all deliveries in 1965 to a recent high in 2006 of 29.1 percent.

More information

The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services has more about postpartum depression.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, news release, Sept. 3, 2008

Last Updated: Sept. 11, 2008

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