ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Hip Replacement Boosts Mobility at Any Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Study Cites Gains in Gall Bladder Cancer Treatment
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
CAREGIVING
Mom's Smoking May Lead to SIDS
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
DIABETES
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
To Feel Better, Low-Fat Diet May Be Best
Coffee Beans May Be Newest Stress-Buster
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gene Mutation May Cause Some Cases of Seasonal Affective Disorder
Walkable Neighborhoods Keep the Pounds Off
Warmer-Than-Average Temperatures Raise Migraine Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
FITNESS
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Barefoot Best for Running?
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
When Clocks Change, Body May Need Time to Adjust
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
SENIORS
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
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Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry

THURSDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers who delivered their babies vaginally appear to be much more sensitive to the cry of their own child within a few weeks of the birth compared with those who deliver by Caesarean section, a new study shows.

The finding, published in The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, give researchers insight into why postpartum depression seems to be linked more often to Caesarean birth.

The researchers based their findings on MRI scans that show heightened activity in the sections of the brain thought to regulate emotions, motivation and habitual behaviors. They believe this may be because vaginal childbirth involves the release of oxytocin -- a key mediator of maternal behavior in animals -- from the posterior pituitary, uterine contractions and vagino-cervical stimulation.

The researchers also studied areas of the brain affected by delivery conditions and found ties between brain activity and measures of mood. This suggests that some of the same brain regions may help regulate postpartum mood.

"As more women opt to wait until they are older to have children, and by association be more likely to have a Caesarean-section delivery, these results are important, because they could provide better understanding of the basic neurophysiology and psychology of parent-infant attachment," lead author James Swain, of Yale University's Child Study Centre, said in a news release issued by the journal's publisher. "This work could lead to early detection of families at risk for postpartum depression and attachment problems and form a model for testing interventions."

Caesarean delivery, which occurs via incisions in the abdominal and uterine wall, is required at times to protect the health or survival of infant or mother. The procedure's use has increased in the United States dramatically, from 4.5 percent of all deliveries in 1965 to a recent high in 2006 of 29.1 percent.

More information

The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services has more about postpartum depression.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, news release, Sept. 3, 2008

Last Updated: Sept. 11, 2008

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