ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Soccer's a Winner for Building Bone Health in Girls
Stem Cells Might Treat Tough Fractures
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
CANCER
Scams and Shams That Prey on Cancer Patients
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
Breast Self-Exam Rates Go Up With Counseling
CAREGIVING
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
MRSA Infections Spreading to Kids in Community
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Atkins Diet Tougher on Heart After Weight Loss
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Climate Change Linked to Longer Pollen Seasons
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
Golf Course Insecticides Pose Little Danger to Players
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
FITNESS
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
Go To Work But Skip The Car
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Combo Treatment Eases Wheezing in Babies
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
Any Old Cane Won't Do
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Add your Article

New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- A new aerosol spray may help keep the airways of cystic fibrosis patients moist and clear, researchers say.

Using a special agent called GS-9411, the spray prevents sodium from being absorbed too quickly, which is a common problem for people with cystic fibrosis. The quick absorption of sodium from the surface of the airway causes their airways to dry, and allows mucous and bacteria to accumulate.

In tests on airway surface cells grown in a laboratory, GS-9411 helped the cells retain moisture for more than eight hours while tests on animals found the spray helped clear excessive mucus for at least four hours.

The findings were presented Sunday at the American Thoracic Society's annual international conference in San Diego.

"GS-9411 administered by aerosol can effectively increase airway surface liquid and enhance mucous clearance in an animal model," study author Andrew Hirsh, senior director of drug discovery and preclinical development for Parion Sciences, a pharmaceutical company, said in a news release. "The results demonstrate that GS-9411 warrants further investigation as a new drug therapy to decrease respiratory infection and improve pulmonary function."

In cystic fibrosis, a genetic defect causes the airway to absorb sodium, and therefore moisture, too quickly. When the airway is too dry, the body can't clear mucus, a key defense mechanism of the respiratory system, Hirsh said. This deficiency can cause cystic fibrosis patients to have chronic respiratory infection and impaired lung function, he explained.

"The potency and the length of time that the drug was effective in cells and in animal studies was an outstanding feature that distinguishes this compound from other agents," he said.

More information

The March of Dimes has more about cystic fibrosis.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: American Thoracic Society, news release, May 17, 2009

Last Updated: May 18, 2009

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