ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Fractures in Older Adults Up Death Risk
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
Human Ancestors Put Best Foot Forward 1.5M Years Ago
CANCER
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
Healthy Behaviors Slow Functional Decline After Cancer
CAREGIVING
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
DIABETES
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Low-Fat Diet Does Little to Alter Cholesterol Levels
Coffee Drinkers Might Live Longer
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Arsenic in Drinking Water Raises Diabetes Risk
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Greener Neighborhoods Mean Slimmer Children
EYE CARE, VISION
Decorative Halloween Eye Lenses May Pose Serious Risks
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Basketball Star Details His Struggle With Gout
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
'Soda Tax' Wins Health Experts' Support
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
Adults Need To Get Thier Food Facts Straight
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
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New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- A new type of yogurt available in some Pacific Rim countries appears to help prevent and fight ulcers and gastritis, according to Japanese researchers.

The finding came from a study involving 42 people who had tested positive for the ulcer-causing bacteria Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). They consumed two cups a day of regular yogurt or yogurt fortified with the antibody IgY-urease. By comparison, people who'd eaten the fortified yogurt had lower levels of urea, a urease byproduct, when retested a month later. That indicated less bacterial activity, according to the researchers, who were to present their finding March 22 at a meeting of the American Chemical Society in Salt Lake City.

"With this new yogurt, people can now enjoy the taste of yogurt while preventing or eliminating the bacteria that cause stomach ulcers," study coordinator Hajime Hatta, a chemist at Kyoto Women's University in Kyoto, Japan, said in a news release issued by the conference sponsors.

Antibiotics proved more effective at controlling the intestinal bacteria than the yogurt, the researchers said. But they believe that many people would prefer to add a few helpings of yogurt to their diet than to take medication, especially since the antibody doesn't seem to alter the taste of the yogurt or cause obvious side effects, Hatta said.

The yogurt -- already sold in Japan, Korea and Taiwan -- may not be for everyone, though. Hatta warned it may cause a reaction in people who have allergies to milk or eggs.

More than 25 million people in the United States have an ulcer at some point in their life, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Hatta's team created the antibody after noting that H. pylori relies on the protein urease to attach to and infect the stomach lining. They injected chickens with urease in hope the birds' immune systems would produce an antibody that could shield the stomach lining. The antibody, IgY-urease, was then harvested from the chicken's eggs, put in yogurt and tested on people with a known H. pylori infection.

Stomach acid eventually kills the IgY-urease antibody, the researchers said.

More information

The National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse has more about ulcers and H. pylori.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: American Chemical Society, news release, March 22, 2009

Last Updated: March 23, 2009

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