ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
CANCER
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
CAREGIVING
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Vitamin B12 Key to Aging Brain
Soluble Fiber, But Not Bran, Soothes Irritable Bowel
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Global Warming Biggest Health Threat of 21st Century, Experts Say
Golf Course Insecticides Pose Little Danger to Players
What's Cookin'? It Could Be Air Pollution
EYE CARE, VISION
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
FITNESS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk
Moderate Aerobic Exercise Lowers Diabetics' Liver Fat
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On
Workplace Wellness Seems to Really Work
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Combo Treatment Eases Wheezing in Babies
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Add your Article

New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- A new type of yogurt available in some Pacific Rim countries appears to help prevent and fight ulcers and gastritis, according to Japanese researchers.

The finding came from a study involving 42 people who had tested positive for the ulcer-causing bacteria Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). They consumed two cups a day of regular yogurt or yogurt fortified with the antibody IgY-urease. By comparison, people who'd eaten the fortified yogurt had lower levels of urea, a urease byproduct, when retested a month later. That indicated less bacterial activity, according to the researchers, who were to present their finding March 22 at a meeting of the American Chemical Society in Salt Lake City.

"With this new yogurt, people can now enjoy the taste of yogurt while preventing or eliminating the bacteria that cause stomach ulcers," study coordinator Hajime Hatta, a chemist at Kyoto Women's University in Kyoto, Japan, said in a news release issued by the conference sponsors.

Antibiotics proved more effective at controlling the intestinal bacteria than the yogurt, the researchers said. But they believe that many people would prefer to add a few helpings of yogurt to their diet than to take medication, especially since the antibody doesn't seem to alter the taste of the yogurt or cause obvious side effects, Hatta said.

The yogurt -- already sold in Japan, Korea and Taiwan -- may not be for everyone, though. Hatta warned it may cause a reaction in people who have allergies to milk or eggs.

More than 25 million people in the United States have an ulcer at some point in their life, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Hatta's team created the antibody after noting that H. pylori relies on the protein urease to attach to and infect the stomach lining. They injected chickens with urease in hope the birds' immune systems would produce an antibody that could shield the stomach lining. The antibody, IgY-urease, was then harvested from the chicken's eggs, put in yogurt and tested on people with a known H. pylori infection.

Stomach acid eventually kills the IgY-urease antibody, the researchers said.

More information

The National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse has more about ulcers and H. pylori.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: American Chemical Society, news release, March 22, 2009

Last Updated: March 23, 2009

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