ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Drinking Cuts Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
CANCER
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
For Dialysis Patients, More Pills = Lower Quality of Life
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
Adults Need To Get Thier Food Facts Straight
Coffee or Tea Consumption May Lower Stroke Risk
The High-Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) Debate
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Fertilizer Ban Makes a Difference
Topical Drugs May Pollute Waterways
EPA Alerts Seniors to Carbon Monoxide Dangers
EYE CARE, VISION
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
FITNESS
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Keep Fire Safety in Mind as You Celebrate
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
SENIORS
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
Add your Article

New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- A new type of yogurt available in some Pacific Rim countries appears to help prevent and fight ulcers and gastritis, according to Japanese researchers.

The finding came from a study involving 42 people who had tested positive for the ulcer-causing bacteria Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). They consumed two cups a day of regular yogurt or yogurt fortified with the antibody IgY-urease. By comparison, people who'd eaten the fortified yogurt had lower levels of urea, a urease byproduct, when retested a month later. That indicated less bacterial activity, according to the researchers, who were to present their finding March 22 at a meeting of the American Chemical Society in Salt Lake City.

"With this new yogurt, people can now enjoy the taste of yogurt while preventing or eliminating the bacteria that cause stomach ulcers," study coordinator Hajime Hatta, a chemist at Kyoto Women's University in Kyoto, Japan, said in a news release issued by the conference sponsors.

Antibiotics proved more effective at controlling the intestinal bacteria than the yogurt, the researchers said. But they believe that many people would prefer to add a few helpings of yogurt to their diet than to take medication, especially since the antibody doesn't seem to alter the taste of the yogurt or cause obvious side effects, Hatta said.

The yogurt -- already sold in Japan, Korea and Taiwan -- may not be for everyone, though. Hatta warned it may cause a reaction in people who have allergies to milk or eggs.

More than 25 million people in the United States have an ulcer at some point in their life, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Hatta's team created the antibody after noting that H. pylori relies on the protein urease to attach to and infect the stomach lining. They injected chickens with urease in hope the birds' immune systems would produce an antibody that could shield the stomach lining. The antibody, IgY-urease, was then harvested from the chicken's eggs, put in yogurt and tested on people with a known H. pylori infection.

Stomach acid eventually kills the IgY-urease antibody, the researchers said.

More information

The National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse has more about ulcers and H. pylori.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: American Chemical Society, news release, March 22, 2009

Last Updated: March 23, 2009

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