ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
Human Ancestors Put Best Foot Forward 1.5M Years Ago
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
CANCER
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
CAREGIVING
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
DIABETES
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
Purple Tomato Extended Lives of Cancer-Prone Mice
For Fitness, Cutting Calories May Not Be Enough
Coffee Drinkers Might Live Longer
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
What's Cookin'? It Could Be Air Pollution
Air Pollution Exposure May Slow Fetal Growth
EYE CARE, VISION
Blood Sugar Control Helps Diabetics Preserve Sight
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Fliers Can Keep Blood Clots at Bay
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Stressed and Exhausted: An Introduction to Adrenal Fatigue
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
Drink Away Dementia?
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Add your Article

New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- A new type of yogurt available in some Pacific Rim countries appears to help prevent and fight ulcers and gastritis, according to Japanese researchers.

The finding came from a study involving 42 people who had tested positive for the ulcer-causing bacteria Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). They consumed two cups a day of regular yogurt or yogurt fortified with the antibody IgY-urease. By comparison, people who'd eaten the fortified yogurt had lower levels of urea, a urease byproduct, when retested a month later. That indicated less bacterial activity, according to the researchers, who were to present their finding March 22 at a meeting of the American Chemical Society in Salt Lake City.

"With this new yogurt, people can now enjoy the taste of yogurt while preventing or eliminating the bacteria that cause stomach ulcers," study coordinator Hajime Hatta, a chemist at Kyoto Women's University in Kyoto, Japan, said in a news release issued by the conference sponsors.

Antibiotics proved more effective at controlling the intestinal bacteria than the yogurt, the researchers said. But they believe that many people would prefer to add a few helpings of yogurt to their diet than to take medication, especially since the antibody doesn't seem to alter the taste of the yogurt or cause obvious side effects, Hatta said.

The yogurt -- already sold in Japan, Korea and Taiwan -- may not be for everyone, though. Hatta warned it may cause a reaction in people who have allergies to milk or eggs.

More than 25 million people in the United States have an ulcer at some point in their life, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Hatta's team created the antibody after noting that H. pylori relies on the protein urease to attach to and infect the stomach lining. They injected chickens with urease in hope the birds' immune systems would produce an antibody that could shield the stomach lining. The antibody, IgY-urease, was then harvested from the chicken's eggs, put in yogurt and tested on people with a known H. pylori infection.

Stomach acid eventually kills the IgY-urease antibody, the researchers said.

More information

The National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse has more about ulcers and H. pylori.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: American Chemical Society, news release, March 22, 2009

Last Updated: March 23, 2009

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