ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Drinking Cuts Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
Chronic Low Back Pain Is on the Rise
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
CANCER
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Gene Screen May Predict Colon Cancer's Return
CAREGIVING
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
U.S. Mental Health Spending Rises, But Many Still Left Out
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Coffee Drinkers Might Live Longer
Herb Shows Potential for Rheumatoid Arthriti
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Artificial Light Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
EYE CARE, VISION
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
FITNESS
Exercise Guards White Blood Cells Against Aging
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Seniors Who Exercise Help Their Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
New Methods Could Speed Production of Flu Vaccines
Man Dies of Brain Inflammation Caused by Deer Tick Virus
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Add your Article

Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly

By Randy Dotinga
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) --New Japanese research suggests that elderly people who get up two or more times a night to urinate face a higher risk of death.

The findings don't offer a possible explanation for the cause of the higher death rate. It could be that a factor like disrupted sleep may play a role, instead of the need to urinate during sleeping hours, a condition known as nocturia.

Whatever the case, the study "reminds us that we should evaluate and treat nocturia and its cause or causes," said Dr. Robert Vorona, an assistant professor of sleep medicine at Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk.

Urination during sleeping hours becomes more common as people get older. According to the study authors, the condition may be linked to a variety of health problems, including heart disease, diabetes, sleep apnea, kidney disease, lower urinary tract problems and sleep disorders.

For the study, the researchers interviewed 788 people aged 70 and older in an urban area of northern Japan; 429 were women and 359 were men. The researchers examined medical records to see what happened to the people for the next three years after the interviews took place in 2003.

The researchers found that those who urinated two or more times a night were 2.7 times more likely to die during the three-year period than those who urinated one or fewer times a night, on average.

The researchers came up with the figure after adjusting their statistics to account for the possible influence of several factors, including diabetes, high blood pressure and alcohol consumption.

The study authors were to present their findings Sunday at the American Urological Association annual meeting, in Chicago.

"Nighttime urination is not necessarily just a matter of getting older. Patients should talk to their doctor about what may be causing this," Dr. Anthony Y. Smith, a spokesman for the urological association, said in a news release. "There may be a very serious, yet treatable, condition involved."

Still, the exact connection between nocturia and higher mortality rates is unclear.

One 2006 study found that people with heart disease and the condition were more likely to die than those with heart disease alone, Vorona said.

Other studies have linked the condition to a higher risk of falls and hip fracture. "These patients might also not sleep well and be less alert during the day -- thus they might be at increased risk for accidents," he said.

More information

To learn more about excessive urination at night, visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.



SOURCES: Robert Vorona, M.D., assistant professor, sleep medicine, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk; April 26, 2009, presentation, American Urological Association annual meeting, Chicago

Last Updated: May 01, 2009

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