ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
Gene Plays Key Role in Clubfoot
CANCER
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
CAREGIVING
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
Are Hospital Mobile Phones Dialing Up Superbugs?
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
DIABETES
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
Keep Stress Off the Holiday Meal Menu, Expert Advises
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
Antioxidants Abound in Cereals, Popcorn, Whole-Grain Snacks
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Hairspray Exposure Ups Risk for Birth Defect in Sons
Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat
Radiation Exposure Linked to Aggressive Thyroid Cancers
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
FITNESS
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Simple Holistic Approach to Fight the Common Cold
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
Food and Water Supply Poisoned by Perchlorate
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Wood Fires Can Harm the Youngest Lungs
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Drink Away Dementia?
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Add your Article

Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly

By Randy Dotinga
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) --New Japanese research suggests that elderly people who get up two or more times a night to urinate face a higher risk of death.

The findings don't offer a possible explanation for the cause of the higher death rate. It could be that a factor like disrupted sleep may play a role, instead of the need to urinate during sleeping hours, a condition known as nocturia.

Whatever the case, the study "reminds us that we should evaluate and treat nocturia and its cause or causes," said Dr. Robert Vorona, an assistant professor of sleep medicine at Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk.

Urination during sleeping hours becomes more common as people get older. According to the study authors, the condition may be linked to a variety of health problems, including heart disease, diabetes, sleep apnea, kidney disease, lower urinary tract problems and sleep disorders.

For the study, the researchers interviewed 788 people aged 70 and older in an urban area of northern Japan; 429 were women and 359 were men. The researchers examined medical records to see what happened to the people for the next three years after the interviews took place in 2003.

The researchers found that those who urinated two or more times a night were 2.7 times more likely to die during the three-year period than those who urinated one or fewer times a night, on average.

The researchers came up with the figure after adjusting their statistics to account for the possible influence of several factors, including diabetes, high blood pressure and alcohol consumption.

The study authors were to present their findings Sunday at the American Urological Association annual meeting, in Chicago.

"Nighttime urination is not necessarily just a matter of getting older. Patients should talk to their doctor about what may be causing this," Dr. Anthony Y. Smith, a spokesman for the urological association, said in a news release. "There may be a very serious, yet treatable, condition involved."

Still, the exact connection between nocturia and higher mortality rates is unclear.

One 2006 study found that people with heart disease and the condition were more likely to die than those with heart disease alone, Vorona said.

Other studies have linked the condition to a higher risk of falls and hip fracture. "These patients might also not sleep well and be less alert during the day -- thus they might be at increased risk for accidents," he said.

More information

To learn more about excessive urination at night, visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.



SOURCES: Robert Vorona, M.D., assistant professor, sleep medicine, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk; April 26, 2009, presentation, American Urological Association annual meeting, Chicago

Last Updated: May 01, 2009

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