ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Traditional Chinese Therapy May Help Ease Eczema
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Pain More a Cause of Arthritis Than a Symptom
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
CANCER
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
More Cancer Tests Mean More False-Positive Results
CAREGIVING
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
Recession Scrambling Health Spending in U.S.
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Caffeine May Offer Some Skin Cancer Protection
Many Kids Don't Need the Vitamins They're Taking
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Rainy Areas in U.S. Show Higher Autism Rates
Air Pollution Raises Risk of Heart Disease, Death
Clear Skies Have Become Less So Over Time, Data Show
EYE CARE, VISION
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
FITNESS
Fliers Can Keep Blood Clots at Bay
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Week of Historic Senate Hearings on Integrative Medicine May Open New Doors
Should the FDA Regulate Tobacco?
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
MEN'S HEALTH
Countdown to Hair Loss
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Add your Article

Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly

By Randy Dotinga
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) --New Japanese research suggests that elderly people who get up two or more times a night to urinate face a higher risk of death.

The findings don't offer a possible explanation for the cause of the higher death rate. It could be that a factor like disrupted sleep may play a role, instead of the need to urinate during sleeping hours, a condition known as nocturia.

Whatever the case, the study "reminds us that we should evaluate and treat nocturia and its cause or causes," said Dr. Robert Vorona, an assistant professor of sleep medicine at Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk.

Urination during sleeping hours becomes more common as people get older. According to the study authors, the condition may be linked to a variety of health problems, including heart disease, diabetes, sleep apnea, kidney disease, lower urinary tract problems and sleep disorders.

For the study, the researchers interviewed 788 people aged 70 and older in an urban area of northern Japan; 429 were women and 359 were men. The researchers examined medical records to see what happened to the people for the next three years after the interviews took place in 2003.

The researchers found that those who urinated two or more times a night were 2.7 times more likely to die during the three-year period than those who urinated one or fewer times a night, on average.

The researchers came up with the figure after adjusting their statistics to account for the possible influence of several factors, including diabetes, high blood pressure and alcohol consumption.

The study authors were to present their findings Sunday at the American Urological Association annual meeting, in Chicago.

"Nighttime urination is not necessarily just a matter of getting older. Patients should talk to their doctor about what may be causing this," Dr. Anthony Y. Smith, a spokesman for the urological association, said in a news release. "There may be a very serious, yet treatable, condition involved."

Still, the exact connection between nocturia and higher mortality rates is unclear.

One 2006 study found that people with heart disease and the condition were more likely to die than those with heart disease alone, Vorona said.

Other studies have linked the condition to a higher risk of falls and hip fracture. "These patients might also not sleep well and be less alert during the day -- thus they might be at increased risk for accidents," he said.

More information

To learn more about excessive urination at night, visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.



SOURCES: Robert Vorona, M.D., assistant professor, sleep medicine, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk; April 26, 2009, presentation, American Urological Association annual meeting, Chicago

Last Updated: May 01, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com