ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
CANCER
Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
CAREGIVING
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
DIABETES
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
TV Food Ads Promote Bad Diets
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Eating in America Still Unhealthy
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Genetics, Environment Shape Sexual Behavior
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Hypertension May Hit Black Males Earlier
EYE CARE, VISION
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
Decorative Halloween Eye Lenses May Pose Serious Risks
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
FITNESS
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Parents Influence Sex Decisions, Hispanic Teens Say
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Help Your Kids Stay Active
Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Natural Therapies for Menopause
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Add your Article

Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease

FRIDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- A nutritious diet could help with the health of your eyes as well as the rest of your body, according to a new study.

Eating foods rich in vitamins C and E, zinc, lutein, zeaxanthin, omega-3 fatty acids and that have less impact on blood sugar levels (so-called low-glycemic index foods) can lower the risk of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD), researchers have found.

Citrus fruits, vegetable oils, nuts, whole grains, dark green leafy vegetables and cold-water fish contain higher levels of these eye-healthy nutrients.

AMD can destroy the eye's retina, the sensitive tissue that transmits images to the brain, causing people to lose the central vision critical to good eyesight. A recent study funded by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that more than 9 million people will have the potentially blinding eye disease by 2010, and that number could double by 2050, with 1.6 million of these people being legally blind.

The study, led by Tufts University's Chung-Jung Chiu, found the lowest risk of developing early and advanced AMD was among people who consumed more protective nutrients and low-glycemic index foods. The conclusions were based on analyzing the eating habits of more than 4,000 study participants and determining their AMD risk from diagnostic photographs of their eyes.

While previous studies have looked at the eye-protective value of individual nutrients and foods, this is the first to look at them in combination, according to a news release issued by the journal Ophthalmology, which is publishing the findings in its May issue.

"Although the compound score may be a useful new tool for assessing nutrients in relation to AMD, specific dietary recommendations should be made only after our results are confirmed by clinical trials or prospective studies," Chiu, who is part of Tufts' Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, said in the news release.

More information

The U.S. National Eye Institute has more about age-related macular degeneration.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: American Academy of Ophthalmology, news release, May 2009

Last Updated: May 15, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com