ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
Fractures in Older Adults Up Death Risk
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
CANCER
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
U.S. Reported 25,000 Cases of HPV-Related Cancers Annually
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
CAREGIVING
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
For Dialysis Patients, More Pills = Lower Quality of Life
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DIET, NUTRITION
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Mediterranean Diet May Help Prevent Depression
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
FDA Faulted for Stance on Chemical in Plastics
Controversial Chemical Lingers Longer in the Body
Hurricane Threats: Time to Batten Down the Hatches
EYE CARE, VISION
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
FITNESS
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
Basketball Star Details His Struggle With Gout
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Hidden Salt in Diet Haunts Many With Heart Failure
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
Treat Kids to a Safe Halloween
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
SENIORS
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Add your Article

Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries

SATURDAY, May 2 (HealthDay News) -- The bones and muscles of the lower body appear to be more vulnerable to injury in obese children than their lighter peers, a new study suggests.

The study analyzed the weight and injuries of kids who visited a children's hospital's emergency department over a three-year period. Sprains, such as to the ankle or leg, were the most common lower body injuries, and sent more than 23,000 children to the emergency department at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center between 2005 and early 2008.

"Because obese patients have an increased body mass and force, they are more likely to twist or roll on a lower extremity and cause injury than the non-obese children. Other injuries that the patients experienced were fractures and lacerations," study lead author Dr. Wendy Pomerantz, an emergency medicine physician at the hospital, said in a hospital news release.

About one-sixth of the children visiting the hospital's emergency department for injuries during that time were obese, according to the study, scheduled to be presented Saturday in Baltimore at the annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies.

Pomerantz noted that obesity is likely to also lengthen a child's recovery time from an injury, as the added weight and stress to the body can cause more damage.

Exercise and diet, she said, remain the best ways to combat the growing obesity epidemic in the world. "Parents of an obese child who want the child to exercise but [are] afraid of the child getting injured should work with a specialist to get a tailored diet and exercise regimen to help them lose weight," Pomerantz said.

Obesity in children also increases their risk of developing type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and other factors that raise their chances of developing cardiovascular disease, according to information from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about childhood obesity.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, news release, May 2, 2009

Last Updated: May 02, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com


Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
U.S. Institute of Natural Health