ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
New Clues to How Fish Oils Help Arthritis Patients
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
CANCER
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Immune Therapy May Aid Kids With Neuroblastoma
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
3 Steps Might Help Stop MRSA's Spread
Are Hospital Mobile Phones Dialing Up Superbugs?
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
DIABETES
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Is Your Refrigerator Getting Enough Attention For Your Raw Food Success?
TV Food Ads Promote Bad Diets
Milk Destroys Antioxidant Benefits in Blueberries
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Short-Term Air Pollution Exposure May Damage DNA
Main Ingredients in Household Dust Come From Outdoors
Exhaust From Railroad Diesel Linked to Lung Ailments
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
FITNESS
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Laugh and the World Understands
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
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Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries

SATURDAY, May 2 (HealthDay News) -- The bones and muscles of the lower body appear to be more vulnerable to injury in obese children than their lighter peers, a new study suggests.

The study analyzed the weight and injuries of kids who visited a children's hospital's emergency department over a three-year period. Sprains, such as to the ankle or leg, were the most common lower body injuries, and sent more than 23,000 children to the emergency department at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center between 2005 and early 2008.

"Because obese patients have an increased body mass and force, they are more likely to twist or roll on a lower extremity and cause injury than the non-obese children. Other injuries that the patients experienced were fractures and lacerations," study lead author Dr. Wendy Pomerantz, an emergency medicine physician at the hospital, said in a hospital news release.

About one-sixth of the children visiting the hospital's emergency department for injuries during that time were obese, according to the study, scheduled to be presented Saturday in Baltimore at the annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies.

Pomerantz noted that obesity is likely to also lengthen a child's recovery time from an injury, as the added weight and stress to the body can cause more damage.

Exercise and diet, she said, remain the best ways to combat the growing obesity epidemic in the world. "Parents of an obese child who want the child to exercise but [are] afraid of the child getting injured should work with a specialist to get a tailored diet and exercise regimen to help them lose weight," Pomerantz said.

Obesity in children also increases their risk of developing type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and other factors that raise their chances of developing cardiovascular disease, according to information from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about childhood obesity.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, news release, May 2, 2009

Last Updated: May 02, 2009

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Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
U.S. Institute of Natural Health