ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
Acupuncture Eases Side Effects of Head, Neck Cancer Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Almost Half of Adults Will Develop Knee Osteoarthritis by 85
Barefoot Lifestyle Has Its Dangers
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
CANCER
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
CAREGIVING
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
Timing May Matter in Organ Donation Decisions
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
DIABETES
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
DIET, NUTRITION
Fatty Acid in Olive Oil Wards Off Hunger
10 Beginner Tips for Fast Weight Loss, the Low-Carb Way!
Eating your way to Good Health
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Green Areas Lower Health Inequities Between Rich, Poor
Pesticides Linked to Parkinson's
Smog Tougher on the Obese
EYE CARE, VISION
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
FITNESS
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Proven Strategies for Avoiding Colds and the Flu
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Vinegar Might Help Keep Off Pounds
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Help Your Kids Stay Active
Scary Toxins Make Halloween Face Paints Questionable
When It Comes to Toys, Shop Smart, Shop Safe
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Countdown to Hair Loss
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Add your Article

Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries

SATURDAY, May 2 (HealthDay News) -- The bones and muscles of the lower body appear to be more vulnerable to injury in obese children than their lighter peers, a new study suggests.

The study analyzed the weight and injuries of kids who visited a children's hospital's emergency department over a three-year period. Sprains, such as to the ankle or leg, were the most common lower body injuries, and sent more than 23,000 children to the emergency department at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center between 2005 and early 2008.

"Because obese patients have an increased body mass and force, they are more likely to twist or roll on a lower extremity and cause injury than the non-obese children. Other injuries that the patients experienced were fractures and lacerations," study lead author Dr. Wendy Pomerantz, an emergency medicine physician at the hospital, said in a hospital news release.

About one-sixth of the children visiting the hospital's emergency department for injuries during that time were obese, according to the study, scheduled to be presented Saturday in Baltimore at the annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies.

Pomerantz noted that obesity is likely to also lengthen a child's recovery time from an injury, as the added weight and stress to the body can cause more damage.

Exercise and diet, she said, remain the best ways to combat the growing obesity epidemic in the world. "Parents of an obese child who want the child to exercise but [are] afraid of the child getting injured should work with a specialist to get a tailored diet and exercise regimen to help them lose weight," Pomerantz said.

Obesity in children also increases their risk of developing type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and other factors that raise their chances of developing cardiovascular disease, according to information from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about childhood obesity.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, news release, May 2, 2009

Last Updated: May 02, 2009

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Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
U.S. Institute of Natural Health