ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
Ginkgo No Shield Against Alzheimer's
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
New Clues to How Fish Oils Help Arthritis Patients
Scientists ID New Genes Tied to Crohn's Disease
CANCER
Healthy Behaviors Slow Functional Decline After Cancer
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
CAREGIVING
Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
DIET, NUTRITION
Is Your Refrigerator Getting Enough Attention For Your Raw Food Success?
Purple Tomato Extended Lives of Cancer-Prone Mice
Iced Teas Pose High Risk of Kidney Stones
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Prenatal Exposure to Traffic Pollution May Lead to Asthma
EYE CARE, VISION
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
FITNESS
Almost Two-Thirds of Americans Meet Exercise Guidelines
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
8 Drugs Doctors Would Never Take
New Options Offered for Sleep Apnea
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Add your Article

Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene

(HealthDay News) -- Women who become obese -- a step above overweight -- by the age of 18 are more likely to become infertile and develop polycystic ovarian syndrome than others, new research suggests.

These obese young women also less likely to become pregnant than women who become obese when they're older, according to the results of a study of 1,538 patients who were undergoing bariatric surgery at clinics in the United States. The women completed surveys about their medical and sexual histories.

Overall, however, the women in the study, who ranged in age from 18 to 78 years, were as likely to have been pregnant and to have given birth to at least one live child as women in the general population. Seventy-nine percent of those who took part in the study had been pregnant at least once, and 74 percent had at least one live birth, the researchers found.

About half of the study participants aged 18 to 44 who could become pregnant said they wouldn't try to have more children after bariatric surgery. The women in this group hadn't reached menopause and weren't sterilized, didn't have partners who were sterilized, and didn't have some other obstacle in the way of pregnancy.

However, 30 percent of the women who could still become pregnant stated that pregnancy was very important to them, and one-third of this group planned to get pregnant within two years of undergoing bariatric surgery, the study authors noted.

"As the incidence of obesity increases in the United States, women's health care practitioners are likely to care for a substantial number of patients who will undergo bariatric surgery. Studies like this one are extremely useful to help us determine how to advise these patients and best meet their needs," said Dr. William Gibbons, president-elect of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, in a news release from the society.

The study findings appeared in the Oct. 7 online edition of the journal Fertility and Sterility.

SOURCES: American Society for Reproductive Medicine, news release, Oct. 8, 2009 Published on: October 16, 2009