ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Returning to the Road Tricky After Injury
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
CANCER
U.S. Reported 25,000 Cases of HPV-Related Cancers Annually
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
CAREGIVING
Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Holistic Dentistry-My View
DIABETES
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
DIET, NUTRITION
TV Food Ads Promote Bad Diets
Imagine Food Aromas That Prevent Overeating
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Most Mt. Everest Deaths Occur Near Summit During Descent
Smog Standards Need Tightening, Activists Say
EPA Alerts Seniors to Carbon Monoxide Dangers
EYE CARE, VISION
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
FITNESS
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Run for Your Life
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
New Methods Could Speed Production of Flu Vaccines
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Small Cuts in Salt Intake Spur Big Drops in Heart Trouble
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Any Old Cane Won't Do
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Add your Article

Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene

(HealthDay News) -- Women who become obese -- a step above overweight -- by the age of 18 are more likely to become infertile and develop polycystic ovarian syndrome than others, new research suggests.

These obese young women also less likely to become pregnant than women who become obese when they're older, according to the results of a study of 1,538 patients who were undergoing bariatric surgery at clinics in the United States. The women completed surveys about their medical and sexual histories.

Overall, however, the women in the study, who ranged in age from 18 to 78 years, were as likely to have been pregnant and to have given birth to at least one live child as women in the general population. Seventy-nine percent of those who took part in the study had been pregnant at least once, and 74 percent had at least one live birth, the researchers found.

About half of the study participants aged 18 to 44 who could become pregnant said they wouldn't try to have more children after bariatric surgery. The women in this group hadn't reached menopause and weren't sterilized, didn't have partners who were sterilized, and didn't have some other obstacle in the way of pregnancy.

However, 30 percent of the women who could still become pregnant stated that pregnancy was very important to them, and one-third of this group planned to get pregnant within two years of undergoing bariatric surgery, the study authors noted.

"As the incidence of obesity increases in the United States, women's health care practitioners are likely to care for a substantial number of patients who will undergo bariatric surgery. Studies like this one are extremely useful to help us determine how to advise these patients and best meet their needs," said Dr. William Gibbons, president-elect of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, in a news release from the society.

The study findings appeared in the Oct. 7 online edition of the journal Fertility and Sterility.

SOURCES: American Society for Reproductive Medicine, news release, Oct. 8, 2009 Published on: October 16, 2009