ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Indigo Ointment Benefits Psoriasis Patients
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
Drinking Cuts Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
High Birth Weight Doubles Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
CAREGIVING
Reduce Suffering, Urge Heart Failure Patients and Caregivers
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
MRSA Infections Spreading to Kids in Community
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DIET, NUTRITION
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
Successful Weight Loss Shows Unique Brain Patterns
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pregnant Rural Women More at Risk
Pilots May Face Greater Cancer Risk
Chemical in Plastics May Cause Fertility Problems
EYE CARE, VISION
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Walking Golf Course Affects Swing, Performance
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
Man Dies of Brain Inflammation Caused by Deer Tick Virus
Should the FDA Regulate Tobacco?
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Any Old Cane Won't Do
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
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Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene

(HealthDay News) -- Women who become obese -- a step above overweight -- by the age of 18 are more likely to become infertile and develop polycystic ovarian syndrome than others, new research suggests.

These obese young women also less likely to become pregnant than women who become obese when they're older, according to the results of a study of 1,538 patients who were undergoing bariatric surgery at clinics in the United States. The women completed surveys about their medical and sexual histories.

Overall, however, the women in the study, who ranged in age from 18 to 78 years, were as likely to have been pregnant and to have given birth to at least one live child as women in the general population. Seventy-nine percent of those who took part in the study had been pregnant at least once, and 74 percent had at least one live birth, the researchers found.

About half of the study participants aged 18 to 44 who could become pregnant said they wouldn't try to have more children after bariatric surgery. The women in this group hadn't reached menopause and weren't sterilized, didn't have partners who were sterilized, and didn't have some other obstacle in the way of pregnancy.

However, 30 percent of the women who could still become pregnant stated that pregnancy was very important to them, and one-third of this group planned to get pregnant within two years of undergoing bariatric surgery, the study authors noted.

"As the incidence of obesity increases in the United States, women's health care practitioners are likely to care for a substantial number of patients who will undergo bariatric surgery. Studies like this one are extremely useful to help us determine how to advise these patients and best meet their needs," said Dr. William Gibbons, president-elect of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, in a news release from the society.

The study findings appeared in the Oct. 7 online edition of the journal Fertility and Sterility.

SOURCES: American Society for Reproductive Medicine, news release, Oct. 8, 2009 Published on: October 16, 2009