ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Traditional Chinese Therapy May Help Ease Eczema
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Autumn Sees More Women With Bunion Problems
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
CANCER
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
CAREGIVING
Reduce Suffering, Urge Heart Failure Patients and Caregivers
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Holistic Dentistry-My View
DIABETES
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
DIET, NUTRITION
Mediterranean Diet Helps Protect Aging Brain
Eating More Soy May Be Good For Your Lung Function
Coffee or Tea Consumption May Lower Stroke Risk
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gas Cooking Might Up Your Cancer Risk
Are Medical Meetings Environmentally Unfriendly?
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
EYE CARE, VISION
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Football Can Shrink Players
Run for Your Life
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Protect Your Kids From Swine Flu While at Camp
Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers
Wood Fires Can Harm the Youngest Lungs
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
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Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says

TUESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Periodically cutting calories may lower the risk of developing breast cancer better than full-time dieting, according to a new study published in Cancer Prevention Research.

Three sets of mice predisposed to developing breast tumors were put on different diets: unlimited eating, intermittently cutting calories by 25 percent, or permanently reducing caloric intake 25 percent. Those on the intermittent diet fared best, with only 9 percent developing mammary tumors compared to 35 percent of those chronically restricted and 71 percent of those that ate all they wanted.

Although previous studies had shown similar results, the researchers were still surprised. Study author Margot P. Cleary, a professor at The Hormel Institute of the University of Minnesota, said her team thought periodic dieting might foster tumor growth as the return of added nourishment could jumpstart the secretion of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), a hormone linked to the promotion of breast cancer.

"Understanding how calorie restriction provides protection against the development of mammary tumors should help us identify pathways that could be targeted for chemoprevention studies," she said in a news release. "Further identification of serum factors that are involved in tumor development would possibly provide a way to identify at-risk individuals and target interventions to these people."

This study "contributes to accumulating evidence that caloric restriction acts by altering hormone levels rather than by directly starving cancers of energy," Dr. Michael Pollak, a professor of oncology at McGill University in Montreal, wrote in an accompanying editorial. "In particular, lower levels of insulin are associated with reduced food intake, and this may be protective," he said.

Finding ways to reduce IGF-1 and insulin in the body, medically or though diet and exercise, should be further investigated, Pollak suggested.

SOURCES: American Association for Cancer Research, news release, Aug. 4, 2009