ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
For All Their Plusses, Pets Pose a Risk for Falls, Too
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
Human Ancestors Put Best Foot Forward 1.5M Years Ago
CANCER
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
Vitamin D May Improve Melanoma Survival
Yoga Eases Sleep Problems Among Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
DIABETES
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Genetics, Environment Shape Sexual Behavior
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
What's Cookin'? It Could Be Air Pollution
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
FITNESS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Exercise Guards White Blood Cells Against Aging
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
More Single Women Are Having Babies
Coffee Cuts Liver Scarring in Hepatitis C
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Frequent Feedings May Be Making Babies Fat
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
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Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says

TUESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Periodically cutting calories may lower the risk of developing breast cancer better than full-time dieting, according to a new study published in Cancer Prevention Research.

Three sets of mice predisposed to developing breast tumors were put on different diets: unlimited eating, intermittently cutting calories by 25 percent, or permanently reducing caloric intake 25 percent. Those on the intermittent diet fared best, with only 9 percent developing mammary tumors compared to 35 percent of those chronically restricted and 71 percent of those that ate all they wanted.

Although previous studies had shown similar results, the researchers were still surprised. Study author Margot P. Cleary, a professor at The Hormel Institute of the University of Minnesota, said her team thought periodic dieting might foster tumor growth as the return of added nourishment could jumpstart the secretion of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), a hormone linked to the promotion of breast cancer.

"Understanding how calorie restriction provides protection against the development of mammary tumors should help us identify pathways that could be targeted for chemoprevention studies," she said in a news release. "Further identification of serum factors that are involved in tumor development would possibly provide a way to identify at-risk individuals and target interventions to these people."

This study "contributes to accumulating evidence that caloric restriction acts by altering hormone levels rather than by directly starving cancers of energy," Dr. Michael Pollak, a professor of oncology at McGill University in Montreal, wrote in an accompanying editorial. "In particular, lower levels of insulin are associated with reduced food intake, and this may be protective," he said.

Finding ways to reduce IGF-1 and insulin in the body, medically or though diet and exercise, should be further investigated, Pollak suggested.

SOURCES: American Association for Cancer Research, news release, Aug. 4, 2009