ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
Rheumatoid Arthritis Hits Women Harder
CANCER
Vitamin D May Lower Colon Cancer Risk
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
CAREGIVING
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
Flu Strikes a Milder Blow This Season
Reduce Suffering, Urge Heart Failure Patients and Caregivers
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
Eating Free Range
The Best Diet? That Depends on You
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Air Pollution Exposure May Slow Fetal Growth
Bed Bugs Bring No Disease Danger
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
EYE CARE, VISION
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
FITNESS
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Workplace Wellness Seems to Really Work
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
When Clocks Change, Body May Need Time to Adjust
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
When It Comes to Toys, Shop Smart, Shop Safe
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
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Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says

TUESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Periodically cutting calories may lower the risk of developing breast cancer better than full-time dieting, according to a new study published in Cancer Prevention Research.

Three sets of mice predisposed to developing breast tumors were put on different diets: unlimited eating, intermittently cutting calories by 25 percent, or permanently reducing caloric intake 25 percent. Those on the intermittent diet fared best, with only 9 percent developing mammary tumors compared to 35 percent of those chronically restricted and 71 percent of those that ate all they wanted.

Although previous studies had shown similar results, the researchers were still surprised. Study author Margot P. Cleary, a professor at The Hormel Institute of the University of Minnesota, said her team thought periodic dieting might foster tumor growth as the return of added nourishment could jumpstart the secretion of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), a hormone linked to the promotion of breast cancer.

"Understanding how calorie restriction provides protection against the development of mammary tumors should help us identify pathways that could be targeted for chemoprevention studies," she said in a news release. "Further identification of serum factors that are involved in tumor development would possibly provide a way to identify at-risk individuals and target interventions to these people."

This study "contributes to accumulating evidence that caloric restriction acts by altering hormone levels rather than by directly starving cancers of energy," Dr. Michael Pollak, a professor of oncology at McGill University in Montreal, wrote in an accompanying editorial. "In particular, lower levels of insulin are associated with reduced food intake, and this may be protective," he said.

Finding ways to reduce IGF-1 and insulin in the body, medically or though diet and exercise, should be further investigated, Pollak suggested.

SOURCES: American Association for Cancer Research, news release, Aug. 4, 2009