ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Living Near Major Road May Boost Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
Barefoot Lifestyle Has Its Dangers
CANCER
Gene Screen May Predict Colon Cancer's Return
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
CAREGIVING
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
3 Steps Might Help Stop MRSA's Spread
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
DIET, NUTRITION
Antioxidant-Rich Foods Lose Nutritional Luster Over Time
Myrrh May Lower High Cholesterol
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Main Ingredients in Household Dust Come From Outdoors
Fertilizer Ban Makes a Difference
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
FITNESS
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Why Am I So Tired? Could It Be Low Thyroid?
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
When It Comes to Toys, Shop Smart, Shop Safe
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
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Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says

TUESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Periodically cutting calories may lower the risk of developing breast cancer better than full-time dieting, according to a new study published in Cancer Prevention Research.

Three sets of mice predisposed to developing breast tumors were put on different diets: unlimited eating, intermittently cutting calories by 25 percent, or permanently reducing caloric intake 25 percent. Those on the intermittent diet fared best, with only 9 percent developing mammary tumors compared to 35 percent of those chronically restricted and 71 percent of those that ate all they wanted.

Although previous studies had shown similar results, the researchers were still surprised. Study author Margot P. Cleary, a professor at The Hormel Institute of the University of Minnesota, said her team thought periodic dieting might foster tumor growth as the return of added nourishment could jumpstart the secretion of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), a hormone linked to the promotion of breast cancer.

"Understanding how calorie restriction provides protection against the development of mammary tumors should help us identify pathways that could be targeted for chemoprevention studies," she said in a news release. "Further identification of serum factors that are involved in tumor development would possibly provide a way to identify at-risk individuals and target interventions to these people."

This study "contributes to accumulating evidence that caloric restriction acts by altering hormone levels rather than by directly starving cancers of energy," Dr. Michael Pollak, a professor of oncology at McGill University in Montreal, wrote in an accompanying editorial. "In particular, lower levels of insulin are associated with reduced food intake, and this may be protective," he said.

Finding ways to reduce IGF-1 and insulin in the body, medically or though diet and exercise, should be further investigated, Pollak suggested.

SOURCES: American Association for Cancer Research, news release, Aug. 4, 2009