ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
For All Their Plusses, Pets Pose a Risk for Falls, Too
'Snowbirds' Beware the Climate Changes
Extra Pounds in Mid-Life Affect Later Mobility
CANCER
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Family History Key Player in Brain Cancer Risk
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
Injected Medication Errors a Major Problem
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
DIABETES
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
DIET, NUTRITION
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gas Cooking Might Up Your Cancer Risk
Smog Standards Need Tightening, Activists Say
Golf Course Insecticides Pose Little Danger to Players
EYE CARE, VISION
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
FITNESS
Fliers Can Keep Blood Clots at Bay
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Run for Your Life
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Autumn Chores Often Hazardous
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Scary Toxins Make Halloween Face Paints Questionable
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Countdown to Hair Loss
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
The Unmedicated Mind
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
SENIORS
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
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Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says

TUESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Periodically cutting calories may lower the risk of developing breast cancer better than full-time dieting, according to a new study published in Cancer Prevention Research.

Three sets of mice predisposed to developing breast tumors were put on different diets: unlimited eating, intermittently cutting calories by 25 percent, or permanently reducing caloric intake 25 percent. Those on the intermittent diet fared best, with only 9 percent developing mammary tumors compared to 35 percent of those chronically restricted and 71 percent of those that ate all they wanted.

Although previous studies had shown similar results, the researchers were still surprised. Study author Margot P. Cleary, a professor at The Hormel Institute of the University of Minnesota, said her team thought periodic dieting might foster tumor growth as the return of added nourishment could jumpstart the secretion of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), a hormone linked to the promotion of breast cancer.

"Understanding how calorie restriction provides protection against the development of mammary tumors should help us identify pathways that could be targeted for chemoprevention studies," she said in a news release. "Further identification of serum factors that are involved in tumor development would possibly provide a way to identify at-risk individuals and target interventions to these people."

This study "contributes to accumulating evidence that caloric restriction acts by altering hormone levels rather than by directly starving cancers of energy," Dr. Michael Pollak, a professor of oncology at McGill University in Montreal, wrote in an accompanying editorial. "In particular, lower levels of insulin are associated with reduced food intake, and this may be protective," he said.

Finding ways to reduce IGF-1 and insulin in the body, medically or though diet and exercise, should be further investigated, Pollak suggested.

SOURCES: American Association for Cancer Research, news release, Aug. 4, 2009