ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
Almost Half of Adults Will Develop Knee Osteoarthritis by 85
Healthy adults have potential autoimmune disease-causing cells
CANCER
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering
CAREGIVING
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
DIABETES
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Eat Up, But Eat Healthy This Holiday Season
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Is Coffee Good or Bad for Your Health?
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Air Pollution May Cause Appendicitis: Study Reveals
Hurricane Threats: Time to Batten Down the Hatches
Main Ingredients in Household Dust Come From Outdoors
EYE CARE, VISION
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
Decorative Halloween Eye Lenses May Pose Serious Risks
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
FITNESS
Football Can Shrink Players
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Eating More Soy May Be Good For Your Lung Function
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
Want Sun Protection? Wear Red or Blue
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
MEN'S HEALTH
Countdown to Hair Loss
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
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Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death

(HealthDay News) -- A study of H1N1 swine flu in Mexico finds that while babies and people under the age of 40 are most likely to get sick, elderly people have the highest death rates.

The research, published online Nov. 11 in The Lancet, analyzed medical records of patients at clinics in the Mexican Institute for Social Security network, who became sick with flu-like illnesses between April 28 and July 31, 2009.

The researchers found 63,479 cases of flu-like illness. Of the 6,945 confirmed cases of H1N1 swine flu, about 1 percent (63 patients) died. Seven percent (475 patients) were admitted to the hospital and lived.

Of those aged 70 and older who got sick, 10.3 percent died. By contrast, 0.9 percent of those aged 20 to 29 died, the study authors noted.

The researchers found that the risk of infection fell by 35 percent in those who received vaccinations for seasonal flu. Chronic disease boosted the risk of death by six times.

Those who didn't go to the hospital within four days after developing symptoms boosted their risk of death by 20 percent for each extra day they delayed a hospital visit.

Pregnant women made up 6 percent of the deaths in Mexico. That rate is a bit lower than in the United States (8 percent) over the same time period.

"In Mexico, all pregnant workers were sent home during the peak of the pandemic, which probably accounts for this difference," Dr. Victor Borja-Aburto of the Mexican Institute for Social Security in Mexico City, and colleagues wrote.

SOURCES: The Lancet, news release, Nov. 11, 2009 Published on: November 11, 2009