ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Soccer's a Winner for Building Bone Health in Girls
Many Americans Fall Short on Their Vitamin D
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
CANCER
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
Healthy Behaviors Slow Functional Decline After Cancer
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
CAREGIVING
Recession Scrambling Health Spending in U.S.
U.S. Mental Health Spending Rises, But Many Still Left Out
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
DIET, NUTRITION
Quick Weight Loss May Be Best for Long-Term Success
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
Main Ingredients in Household Dust Come From Outdoors
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
EYE CARE, VISION
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
FITNESS
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
Exercise 30 Minutes a Day? Who Knew!
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Be Healthy, Spend Less
Dr Churchill & Ashley Pelton Interview 1 of 4
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Help Your Kids Stay Active
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
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Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk

FRIDAY, June 13 (HealthDay News) -- Consuming fish and other foods that contain omega-3 fatty acids may reduce the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of severe vision loss in elderly people.

Australian researchers reviewed nine published studies that included a total of 88,974 participants, including 3,203 people with AMD. The combined findings from the studies suggest that a high dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids is associated with a 38 percent reduced risk of late (advanced) AMD, and that eating fish twice a week is associated with a reduced risk of both early and late AMD.

The study was published in the June issue of the journal Archives of Ophthalmology.

The University of Melbourne researchers noted that long-chain omega-3 fatty acids form an integral part of the layer of nerve cells in the retina. Outer cells of the retina are continually shed and regenerated. Because of this, deficiencies in omega-3 fatty acids may cause AMD.

"A diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids and fish, as a proxy for long-chain omega-3 fatty acid intake, has therefore been hypothesized as a means to prevent AMD," the researchers wrote.

While they did find an association between omega-3 fatty acid intake and reduced risk of AMD, they didn't go so far as to recommend regular consumption of omega-3 fatty acids to ward off AMD.

"Although this meta-analysis suggests that consumption of fish and food rich in omega-3 fatty acids may be associated with a lower risk of AMD, there is insufficient evidence from the current literature, with few prospective studies and no randomized clinical trials, to support their routine consumption for AMD," the researchers concluded.

More information

The National Eye Institute has more about age-related macular degeneration.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, June 9, 2008

Last Updated: June 13, 2008

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