ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
Traditional Chinese Therapy May Help Ease Eczema
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
Too Few Screened for Abdominal Aneurysm, Study Says
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
CANCER
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
CAREGIVING
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Health Tip: After Liposuction
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
DIABETES
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DIET, NUTRITION
Low Vitamin A, C Intake Tied to Asthma Risk
Myrrh May Lower High Cholesterol
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Accumulated Lead May Affect Older Women's Brains
Preparing for a Chlorine Gas Disaster
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
EYE CARE, VISION
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
FITNESS
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Seniors Who Exercise Help Their Health
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
Soluble Fiber, But Not Bran, Soothes Irritable Bowel
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Add your Article

Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Children's hospitals have widely varying policies on organ donation after cardiac death (DCD), according to researchers, who asked 124 hospitals in the United States, Puerto Rico and Canada about their policies in 2007 and 2008.

The study authors received responses from 105 hospitals, and found that 72 percent of them had DCD policies, while policies were being developed in 19 percent, and 7 percent did not have and were not developing policies.

Of the 73 hospitals with DCD policies that were analyzed, 61 (84 percent) specified criteria or tests for declaring death, including electrocardiogram (ECG) findings, no pulse, no breathing, and unresponsiveness. Four policies required total waiting periods prior to organ removal that conflict with professional guidelines: One policy had a waiting period of less than 2 minutes, and three policies had waiting periods of longer than 5 minutes.

The researchers also found that 64 policies (88 percent) didn't allow transplant personnel to declare death, and 51 percent prohibited them from being involved in premortem (taking place immediately before death) management.

The importance of palliative care was noted in 65 policies (89 percent), but only 7 percent recommended or required palliative care consultation. The use of medications with the intention to hasten death was prohibited in 32 policies (44 percent), the researchers found.

The location of withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment was specified in 68 policies (93 percent), with the majority (54 percent) requiring withdrawal to occur in the operating room. Other locations specified in policies included areas adjacent to the operating room (19 percent), the emergency department (4 percent), or the intensive care unit (4 percent).

"This study demonstrates that, consistent with a national emphasis on increasing the supply of transplantable organs, a large number of children's hospitals have developed or are developing DCD policies," wrote Dr. Armand H. Matheny Antommaria, of the University of Utah School of Medicine, in Salt Lake City, and colleagues.

"The policies exhibit notable variation both within those we studied and compared with authoritative reports and statements. Further research will be required to determine the importance of variation in the tests for declaring death or the processes for withdrawing life-sustaining treatment. In the long run, public policy may need to address strategies to promote adherence to recommendations for DCD processes based on sufficient clinical evidence and/or ethical justification," they concluded.

The study appears in the May 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

More information

The United Network for Organ Sharing has more about pediatric transplants.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Journal of the American Medical Association, news release, May 12, 2009

Last Updated: May 12, 2009

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