ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Traditional Chinese Therapy May Help Ease Eczema
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
Too Few Screened for Abdominal Aneurysm, Study Says
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
CANCER
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
Meditation May Reduce Stress in Breast Cancer Patients
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
CAREGIVING
Babies Born in High Pollen Months at Wheezing Risk
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
DIABETES
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Mediterranean Diet May Help Prevent Depression
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Lead Exposure in Childhood Linked to Criminal Behavior Later
Rainy Areas in U.S. Show Higher Autism Rates
Hypertension May Hit Black Males Earlier
EYE CARE, VISION
Antioxidant-Rich Diet May Protect Against Eye Disease
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
FITNESS
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Workplace Wellness Seems to Really Work
Asparagus May Ease Hangover
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Add your Article

Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Children's hospitals have widely varying policies on organ donation after cardiac death (DCD), according to researchers, who asked 124 hospitals in the United States, Puerto Rico and Canada about their policies in 2007 and 2008.

The study authors received responses from 105 hospitals, and found that 72 percent of them had DCD policies, while policies were being developed in 19 percent, and 7 percent did not have and were not developing policies.

Of the 73 hospitals with DCD policies that were analyzed, 61 (84 percent) specified criteria or tests for declaring death, including electrocardiogram (ECG) findings, no pulse, no breathing, and unresponsiveness. Four policies required total waiting periods prior to organ removal that conflict with professional guidelines: One policy had a waiting period of less than 2 minutes, and three policies had waiting periods of longer than 5 minutes.

The researchers also found that 64 policies (88 percent) didn't allow transplant personnel to declare death, and 51 percent prohibited them from being involved in premortem (taking place immediately before death) management.

The importance of palliative care was noted in 65 policies (89 percent), but only 7 percent recommended or required palliative care consultation. The use of medications with the intention to hasten death was prohibited in 32 policies (44 percent), the researchers found.

The location of withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment was specified in 68 policies (93 percent), with the majority (54 percent) requiring withdrawal to occur in the operating room. Other locations specified in policies included areas adjacent to the operating room (19 percent), the emergency department (4 percent), or the intensive care unit (4 percent).

"This study demonstrates that, consistent with a national emphasis on increasing the supply of transplantable organs, a large number of children's hospitals have developed or are developing DCD policies," wrote Dr. Armand H. Matheny Antommaria, of the University of Utah School of Medicine, in Salt Lake City, and colleagues.

"The policies exhibit notable variation both within those we studied and compared with authoritative reports and statements. Further research will be required to determine the importance of variation in the tests for declaring death or the processes for withdrawing life-sustaining treatment. In the long run, public policy may need to address strategies to promote adherence to recommendations for DCD processes based on sufficient clinical evidence and/or ethical justification," they concluded.

The study appears in the May 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

More information

The United Network for Organ Sharing has more about pediatric transplants.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Journal of the American Medical Association, news release, May 12, 2009

Last Updated: May 12, 2009

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