ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
Needling Away Your Headaches With Acupuncture
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Living Near Major Road May Boost Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
CANCER
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Scams and Shams That Prey on Cancer Patients
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
CAREGIVING
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
Are Hospital Mobile Phones Dialing Up Superbugs?
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
DIABETES
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
Coffee or Tea Consumption May Lower Stroke Risk
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Sunken, Unexploded Bombs Pose Cancer Risk
Genetics, Environment Shape Sexual Behavior
Hairspray Exposure Ups Risk for Birth Defect in Sons
EYE CARE, VISION
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Swine Flu May Have Infected More Than 100,000 Americans
Be Healthy, Spend Less
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Countdown to Hair Loss
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
SENIORS
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Add your Article

Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory

THURSDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- A rise in blood sugar levels causes poorer brain function in people with type 2 diabetes, according to a study that included nearly 3,000 people aged 55 and older at 52 sites in Canada and the United States.

The participants, who were part of a larger study on cardiovascular risk in diabetes, underwent cognitive tests designed to measure several aspects of memory function. The researchers found that a 1 percent increase in A1C levels (average blood glucose levels over a period of two to three months) was associated with slightly lower scores on tests of psychomotor speed, global cognitive function, memory and multi-tasking.

However, no link was found between tests scores and daily blood glucose levels, which are measured by a fasting plasma glucose test.

The findings appear in the February issue of Diabetes Care.

"One of the little-known complications of type 2 diabetes is memory decline leading to dementia, particularly Alzheimer's disease," principal investigator Dr. Jeff Williamson, of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, said in a news release from the university.

"This study adds to the growing evidence that poorer blood glucose control is strongly associated with poorer memory function and that these associations can be detected well before a person develops severe memory loss," he said.

Previous research has shown that people with diabetes are 1.5 times more likely than those without diabetes to experience cognitive decline and develop dementia.

Williamson said that "people with type 2 diabetes and their health-care providers need to be careful in situations where there is education and teaching about diabetes care, as patients may need a little more time to absorb and process information."

And he urged people with diabetes to "be open to having a family member periodically making sure they are keeping track of managing their diabetes through monitoring, diet, exercise and medication."

More information

The U.S. National Diabetes Education Program has more about controlling diabetes.



-- Robert Preidt



Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, news release, Feb. 11, 2009

Last Updated: Feb. 19, 2009

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