ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
Most Kids With Type 1 Diabetes Lack Vitamin D
CANCER
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Gene Screen May Predict Colon Cancer's Return
CAREGIVING
Reduce Suffering, Urge Heart Failure Patients and Caregivers
With Age Comes Greater Risk of Hypothermia
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
Mediterranean Diet Enriched With Nuts Cuts Heart Risks
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gene Mutation May Cause Some Cases of Seasonal Affective Disorder
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
Skin Woes Take Toll on U.S. Combat Troops
EYE CARE, VISION
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
FITNESS
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
Proven Strategies for Avoiding Colds and the Flu
Sun, Smoke, Extra Weight Add Years to Skin
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
Treat Kids to a Safe Halloween
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
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Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory

THURSDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- A rise in blood sugar levels causes poorer brain function in people with type 2 diabetes, according to a study that included nearly 3,000 people aged 55 and older at 52 sites in Canada and the United States.

The participants, who were part of a larger study on cardiovascular risk in diabetes, underwent cognitive tests designed to measure several aspects of memory function. The researchers found that a 1 percent increase in A1C levels (average blood glucose levels over a period of two to three months) was associated with slightly lower scores on tests of psychomotor speed, global cognitive function, memory and multi-tasking.

However, no link was found between tests scores and daily blood glucose levels, which are measured by a fasting plasma glucose test.

The findings appear in the February issue of Diabetes Care.

"One of the little-known complications of type 2 diabetes is memory decline leading to dementia, particularly Alzheimer's disease," principal investigator Dr. Jeff Williamson, of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, said in a news release from the university.

"This study adds to the growing evidence that poorer blood glucose control is strongly associated with poorer memory function and that these associations can be detected well before a person develops severe memory loss," he said.

Previous research has shown that people with diabetes are 1.5 times more likely than those without diabetes to experience cognitive decline and develop dementia.

Williamson said that "people with type 2 diabetes and their health-care providers need to be careful in situations where there is education and teaching about diabetes care, as patients may need a little more time to absorb and process information."

And he urged people with diabetes to "be open to having a family member periodically making sure they are keeping track of managing their diabetes through monitoring, diet, exercise and medication."

More information

The U.S. National Diabetes Education Program has more about controlling diabetes.



-- Robert Preidt



Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, news release, Feb. 11, 2009

Last Updated: Feb. 19, 2009

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