ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Get in Step With Summer Foot Care
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
CANCER
Multiple Screening Strategy Boosts Cervical Cancer Detection
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Breast Self-Exam Rates Go Up With Counseling
CAREGIVING
Injected Medication Errors a Major Problem
Many Alzheimer's Caregivers Admit to Abusive Behavior
Simpler Sleep Apnea Treatment Seems Effective, Affordable
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Disinfectants Can Boost Bacteria's Resistance to Treatment
Pilots May Face Greater Cancer Risk
What's Cookin'? It Could Be Air Pollution
EYE CARE, VISION
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
FITNESS
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Vitamin E Helps Treat Common Liver Disease
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Treat Kids to a Safe Halloween
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Natural Therapies for Menopause
Add your Article

Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory

THURSDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- A rise in blood sugar levels causes poorer brain function in people with type 2 diabetes, according to a study that included nearly 3,000 people aged 55 and older at 52 sites in Canada and the United States.

The participants, who were part of a larger study on cardiovascular risk in diabetes, underwent cognitive tests designed to measure several aspects of memory function. The researchers found that a 1 percent increase in A1C levels (average blood glucose levels over a period of two to three months) was associated with slightly lower scores on tests of psychomotor speed, global cognitive function, memory and multi-tasking.

However, no link was found between tests scores and daily blood glucose levels, which are measured by a fasting plasma glucose test.

The findings appear in the February issue of Diabetes Care.

"One of the little-known complications of type 2 diabetes is memory decline leading to dementia, particularly Alzheimer's disease," principal investigator Dr. Jeff Williamson, of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, said in a news release from the university.

"This study adds to the growing evidence that poorer blood glucose control is strongly associated with poorer memory function and that these associations can be detected well before a person develops severe memory loss," he said.

Previous research has shown that people with diabetes are 1.5 times more likely than those without diabetes to experience cognitive decline and develop dementia.

Williamson said that "people with type 2 diabetes and their health-care providers need to be careful in situations where there is education and teaching about diabetes care, as patients may need a little more time to absorb and process information."

And he urged people with diabetes to "be open to having a family member periodically making sure they are keeping track of managing their diabetes through monitoring, diet, exercise and medication."

More information

The U.S. National Diabetes Education Program has more about controlling diabetes.



-- Robert Preidt



Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, news release, Feb. 11, 2009

Last Updated: Feb. 19, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com