ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
Drinking Cuts Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
CANCER
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
Get to Know the Pap Test
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Recession Scrambling Health Spending in U.S.
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Eating Vegan or Raw-Vegan at Regular Restaurants
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Ozone-Depleting Inhalers Being Phased Out
Think You Are Lead-Free? Check Your Soil
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
EYE CARE, VISION
Antioxidant-Rich Diet May Protect Against Eye Disease
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
Decorative Halloween Eye Lenses May Pose Serious Risks
FITNESS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Run for Your Life
Marathoners Go the Distance on Heart Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Go To Work But Skip The Car
Treat symptoms (result of disease) or diagnose systems (cause of disease)?
Swine Flu Fatality Rate a 'Little Bit' Higher Than That of Seasonal Flu
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Add your Article

Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory

THURSDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- A rise in blood sugar levels causes poorer brain function in people with type 2 diabetes, according to a study that included nearly 3,000 people aged 55 and older at 52 sites in Canada and the United States.

The participants, who were part of a larger study on cardiovascular risk in diabetes, underwent cognitive tests designed to measure several aspects of memory function. The researchers found that a 1 percent increase in A1C levels (average blood glucose levels over a period of two to three months) was associated with slightly lower scores on tests of psychomotor speed, global cognitive function, memory and multi-tasking.

However, no link was found between tests scores and daily blood glucose levels, which are measured by a fasting plasma glucose test.

The findings appear in the February issue of Diabetes Care.

"One of the little-known complications of type 2 diabetes is memory decline leading to dementia, particularly Alzheimer's disease," principal investigator Dr. Jeff Williamson, of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, said in a news release from the university.

"This study adds to the growing evidence that poorer blood glucose control is strongly associated with poorer memory function and that these associations can be detected well before a person develops severe memory loss," he said.

Previous research has shown that people with diabetes are 1.5 times more likely than those without diabetes to experience cognitive decline and develop dementia.

Williamson said that "people with type 2 diabetes and their health-care providers need to be careful in situations where there is education and teaching about diabetes care, as patients may need a little more time to absorb and process information."

And he urged people with diabetes to "be open to having a family member periodically making sure they are keeping track of managing their diabetes through monitoring, diet, exercise and medication."

More information

The U.S. National Diabetes Education Program has more about controlling diabetes.



-- Robert Preidt



Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, news release, Feb. 11, 2009

Last Updated: Feb. 19, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com