ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
CANCER
Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
CAREGIVING
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
U.S. Mental Health Spending Rises, But Many Still Left Out
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
DIABETES
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Fruits, Vegetables, Teas May Cut Smokers' Cancer Risk
Marinades Help Keep Grilled Meat Safe
Fruit Even Healthier Than Thought: Study Shows
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Short-Term Air Pollution Exposure May Damage DNA
Smog Tougher on the Obese
EYE CARE, VISION
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
Decorative Halloween Eye Lenses May Pose Serious Risks
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
FITNESS
Football Can Shrink Players
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
Maximize Your Run
Man Dies of Brain Inflammation Caused by Deer Tick Virus
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Add your Article

Pain More a Cause of Arthritis Than a Symptom

MONDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The pain caused by osteoarthritis may be as damaging as the disease itself, according to a new study.

According to a University of Rochester study published Monday in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatism, the nerve pathways carrying pain signals between the arthritic joints and the spinal cord transfer inflammation to the spine and surrounding cells and back again.

"Until relatively recently, osteoarthritis was believed to be due solely to wear and tear, and inevitable part of aging," Stephanos Kyrkanides, associate professor of dentistry at the school's Medical Center, said in a university news release. "Recent studies have revealed, however, that specific biochemical changes contribute to the disease, changes that might be reversed by precision-designed drugs. Our study provides the first solid proof that some of those changes are related to pain processing and suggests the mechanisms behind the effect."

The study gives strong evidence that this two-way "crosstalk" may first enable joint arthritis to transmit inflammation into the spinal cord and brain, eventually leading to it spreading through the central nervous system.

The researchers genetically engineered mice to study levels of a pro-inflammatory signaling chemical called interleukin 1-beta. Their experiments showed that higher levels of the chemical in a peripheral joint caused higher levels to be produced in the dorsal horns of the spinal cord and in spinal cord cells called astrocytes, which cause more osteoarthritic symptoms in joints.

In the mouse experiments, shutting down the signaling reversed the crosstalk effects. Some existing arthritis drugs, such as Kineret (anakinra), block the ability of interleukin 1-beta to send a pain signal through its specific nerve cell receptor, and Kyrkanides' group is experimenting with them as in osteoarthritis treatment.

More information

The Arthritis Foundation has more about osteoarthritis.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: University of Rochester Medical Center, news release, Sept. 29, 2008

Last Updated: Sept. 29, 2008

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