ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
Majority of College Students Report Backpack-Related Pain
Tequila Plant May Help Fight Bone Loss
CANCER
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
Children's Bath Products Contain Contaminants
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
DIABETES
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
DIET, NUTRITION
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Breakfast Eggs Keep Folks on Diet
Go Healthy, Not Hungry for Holiday Eating
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Vitamin D Deficit May Trigger MS Risk Gene
Short-Term Air Pollution Exposure May Damage DNA
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
EYE CARE, VISION
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
Antioxidant-Rich Diet May Protect Against Eye Disease
FITNESS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
MRSA Infections Can Bug Fitness Buffs
Run for Your Life
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
Want Sun Protection? Wear Red or Blue
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
SENIORS
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
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Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy

TUESDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Clipping a photo of the patient next to their radiological scans helps humanize each case and boosts the accuracy with which scans are read by radiologists, a new study finds.

As technological advances have further distanced the radiologist from interaction with the patient, putting a patient's photo in his or her file may enable a more personal and empathetic approach, according to an Israeli study expected to be presented Tuesday at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America, in Chicago.

"Our study emphasizes approaching the patient as a human being and not as an anonymous case study," lead author Dr. Yehonatan N. Turner, radiology resident at Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem, said in a news release issued by the conference's organizer. "We feel it is important to counteract the anonymity that is common in radiologic exams, especially with the growth of teleradiology."

For the study, radiologists reviewed patients' files electronically via their hospital's picture archiving and communication system (PACS), a network for the storage and retrieval of medical images. When the files were open, the patient's photograph appeared automatically.

The results showed that radiologists gave a more meticulous reading of the medical images when a patient photo accompanied the file. For example, about 80 percent of the radiologic incidental findings reported originally were not reported when the radiologist re-examined the files three months later with the patient's photograph omitted from the file.

After reviewing the files, the radiologists all said they felt more empathy toward the patients after viewing their photos. The photographs often revealed key medical information, such as suffering or physical signs of disease, the doctors said.

"The photos were very helpful both in terms of improving diagnosis and the physicians own feelings as caregivers," Turner said. "Down the road, we would like to see photos added to all radiology case files."

More information

The U.S. National Institutes of Health has more about diagnostic imaging.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Radiological Society of North America, news release, Dec. 2, 2008

Last Updated: Dec. 02, 2008

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