ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Low Vitamin D Raises Women's Hip Fracture Risk
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
Pain More a Cause of Arthritis Than a Symptom
CANCER
Gene Screen May Predict Colon Cancer's Return
Gene Studies Reveal Cancer's Secrets
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
CAREGIVING
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
MRSA Infections Spreading to Kids in Community
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
DIABETES
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Golf Course Insecticides Pose Little Danger to Players
Pollution Particles Impair Blood Vessel Function
Sunken, Unexploded Bombs Pose Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
FITNESS
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
What you need to know about swine flu.
Dr Churchill & Ashley Pelton Interview 1 of 4
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
Pool Chemicals Raise Kids Allergy, Asthma Risk
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Optimism May Boost Immune System
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
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Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy

TUESDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Clipping a photo of the patient next to their radiological scans helps humanize each case and boosts the accuracy with which scans are read by radiologists, a new study finds.

As technological advances have further distanced the radiologist from interaction with the patient, putting a patient's photo in his or her file may enable a more personal and empathetic approach, according to an Israeli study expected to be presented Tuesday at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America, in Chicago.

"Our study emphasizes approaching the patient as a human being and not as an anonymous case study," lead author Dr. Yehonatan N. Turner, radiology resident at Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem, said in a news release issued by the conference's organizer. "We feel it is important to counteract the anonymity that is common in radiologic exams, especially with the growth of teleradiology."

For the study, radiologists reviewed patients' files electronically via their hospital's picture archiving and communication system (PACS), a network for the storage and retrieval of medical images. When the files were open, the patient's photograph appeared automatically.

The results showed that radiologists gave a more meticulous reading of the medical images when a patient photo accompanied the file. For example, about 80 percent of the radiologic incidental findings reported originally were not reported when the radiologist re-examined the files three months later with the patient's photograph omitted from the file.

After reviewing the files, the radiologists all said they felt more empathy toward the patients after viewing their photos. The photographs often revealed key medical information, such as suffering or physical signs of disease, the doctors said.

"The photos were very helpful both in terms of improving diagnosis and the physicians own feelings as caregivers," Turner said. "Down the road, we would like to see photos added to all radiology case files."

More information

The U.S. National Institutes of Health has more about diagnostic imaging.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Radiological Society of North America, news release, Dec. 2, 2008

Last Updated: Dec. 02, 2008

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