ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
Barefoot Lifestyle Has Its Dangers
Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years
CANCER
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
More Cancer Tests Mean More False-Positive Results
CAREGIVING
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
DIABETES
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
B Vitamins Might Lower Stroke Risk
Fruit Even Healthier Than Thought: Study Shows
Vinegar Might Help Keep Off Pounds
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Air Pollution May Cause Appendicitis: Study Reveals
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Staying Slim Is Good for the Environment
EYE CARE, VISION
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
FITNESS
Basketball Star Details His Struggle With Gout
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Be Healthy, Spend Less
Spread of Swine Flu in Japan Could Raise WHO Alert to Highest Level
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Frequent Feedings May Be Making Babies Fat
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Drink Away Dementia?
The Unmedicated Mind
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
SENIORS
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
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Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy

TUESDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Clipping a photo of the patient next to their radiological scans helps humanize each case and boosts the accuracy with which scans are read by radiologists, a new study finds.

As technological advances have further distanced the radiologist from interaction with the patient, putting a patient's photo in his or her file may enable a more personal and empathetic approach, according to an Israeli study expected to be presented Tuesday at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America, in Chicago.

"Our study emphasizes approaching the patient as a human being and not as an anonymous case study," lead author Dr. Yehonatan N. Turner, radiology resident at Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem, said in a news release issued by the conference's organizer. "We feel it is important to counteract the anonymity that is common in radiologic exams, especially with the growth of teleradiology."

For the study, radiologists reviewed patients' files electronically via their hospital's picture archiving and communication system (PACS), a network for the storage and retrieval of medical images. When the files were open, the patient's photograph appeared automatically.

The results showed that radiologists gave a more meticulous reading of the medical images when a patient photo accompanied the file. For example, about 80 percent of the radiologic incidental findings reported originally were not reported when the radiologist re-examined the files three months later with the patient's photograph omitted from the file.

After reviewing the files, the radiologists all said they felt more empathy toward the patients after viewing their photos. The photographs often revealed key medical information, such as suffering or physical signs of disease, the doctors said.

"The photos were very helpful both in terms of improving diagnosis and the physicians own feelings as caregivers," Turner said. "Down the road, we would like to see photos added to all radiology case files."

More information

The U.S. National Institutes of Health has more about diagnostic imaging.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Radiological Society of North America, news release, Dec. 2, 2008

Last Updated: Dec. 02, 2008

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