ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
Soccer's a Winner for Building Bone Health in Girls
CANCER
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
The High-Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) Debate
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
Is It Safe to Go in the Gulf Coast's Water?
Database Helps Assess Your Breast Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
FITNESS
Seniors Who Exercise Help Their Health
Almost Two-Thirds of Americans Meet Exercise Guidelines
MRSA Infections Can Bug Fitness Buffs
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Frequent Feedings May Be Making Babies Fat
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Countdown to Hair Loss
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Add your Article

Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy

TUESDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Clipping a photo of the patient next to their radiological scans helps humanize each case and boosts the accuracy with which scans are read by radiologists, a new study finds.

As technological advances have further distanced the radiologist from interaction with the patient, putting a patient's photo in his or her file may enable a more personal and empathetic approach, according to an Israeli study expected to be presented Tuesday at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America, in Chicago.

"Our study emphasizes approaching the patient as a human being and not as an anonymous case study," lead author Dr. Yehonatan N. Turner, radiology resident at Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem, said in a news release issued by the conference's organizer. "We feel it is important to counteract the anonymity that is common in radiologic exams, especially with the growth of teleradiology."

For the study, radiologists reviewed patients' files electronically via their hospital's picture archiving and communication system (PACS), a network for the storage and retrieval of medical images. When the files were open, the patient's photograph appeared automatically.

The results showed that radiologists gave a more meticulous reading of the medical images when a patient photo accompanied the file. For example, about 80 percent of the radiologic incidental findings reported originally were not reported when the radiologist re-examined the files three months later with the patient's photograph omitted from the file.

After reviewing the files, the radiologists all said they felt more empathy toward the patients after viewing their photos. The photographs often revealed key medical information, such as suffering or physical signs of disease, the doctors said.

"The photos were very helpful both in terms of improving diagnosis and the physicians own feelings as caregivers," Turner said. "Down the road, we would like to see photos added to all radiology case files."

More information

The U.S. National Institutes of Health has more about diagnostic imaging.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Radiological Society of North America, news release, Dec. 2, 2008

Last Updated: Dec. 02, 2008

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