ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
Many Americans Fall Short on Their Vitamin D
CANCER
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
More Americans Urged to Get Cancer Screenings
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
CAREGIVING
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
DIABETES
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
DIET, NUTRITION
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Iced Teas Pose High Risk of Kidney Stones
Even in 'Last Supper,' Portion Sizes Have Grown
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications
Population-Based Strategy Urged to Cut U.S. Obesity Rate
Meat-Eating Dinosaurs Used Legs and Arms Like Birds
EYE CARE, VISION
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
FITNESS
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
Maximize Your Run
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Can a Bad Boss Make You Sick?
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
Internet Program Helps Problem Drinkers
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
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Pesticides Linked to Parkinson's

(HealthDay News) -- People whose jobs bring them in regular contact with pesticides may be at increased risk for Parkinson's disease, a U.S. study finds.

Researchers asked 519 Parkinson's patients and 511 people without the disease about their work history and exposure to toxins, including pesticides and solvents. Working in agriculture, education, health care or welding wasn't associated with Parkinson's disease, nor was any other specific occupation after the researchers adjusted for other factors.

But the study found that 44 (8.5 percent) of Parkinson's patients reported pesticide exposure, compared with 27 (5.3 percent) of those without the disease. The finding suggests an association between work-related pesticide exposure and increased risk of Parkinson's.

"Growing evidence suggests a causal association between pesticide use and parkinsonism. However, the term 'pesticide' is broad and includes chemicals with varied mechanisms," wrote Dr. Caroline M. Tanner of the Parkinson's Institute in Sunnyvale, Calif., and colleagues. "Because few investigations have identified specific pesticides, we studied eight pesticides with high neurotoxic plausibility based on laboratory findings. Use of these pesticides was associated with higher risk of parkinsonism, more than double that in those not exposed."

Three compounds -- an organic (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid), an herbicide (paraquat), and an insecticide (permethrin) -- were associated with a more than threefold increased risk of Parkinson's, the study found. Laboratory tests have shown that all three compounds have effects on dopaminergic neurons, which are affected by Parkinson's disease.

"This convergence of epidemiologic and laboratory data from experimental models of Parkinson's disease lends credence to a causative role of certain pesticides in the neurodegenerative process," Tanner and colleagues concluded. "Other pesticide exposures, such as hobby gardening, residential exposure, wearing treated garments or dietary intake, were not assessed. Because these exposures may affect more subjects, future attention is warranted."

The study appears in the September issue of the Archives of Neurology.

SOURCES: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, Sept. 14, 2009