ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
'Snowbirds' Beware the Climate Changes
Breast-feeding Might Shield Women From Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
Yoga Eases Sleep Problems Among Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
Coffee Drinking Lowers Women's Stroke Risk
Eat Up, But Eat Healthy This Holiday Season
Six Healthy-Sounding Foods That Really Aren't
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Ozone Pollution Taking Toll on American Lives
Climate Change Linked to Longer Pollen Seasons
Prenatal Exposure to Traffic Pollution May Lead to Asthma
EYE CARE, VISION
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
FITNESS
MRSA Infections Can Bug Fitness Buffs
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Sun, Smoke, Extra Weight Add Years to Skin
Swine Flu Fatality Rate a 'Little Bit' Higher Than That of Seasonal Flu
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
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Pesticides Linked to Parkinson's

(HealthDay News) -- People whose jobs bring them in regular contact with pesticides may be at increased risk for Parkinson's disease, a U.S. study finds.

Researchers asked 519 Parkinson's patients and 511 people without the disease about their work history and exposure to toxins, including pesticides and solvents. Working in agriculture, education, health care or welding wasn't associated with Parkinson's disease, nor was any other specific occupation after the researchers adjusted for other factors.

But the study found that 44 (8.5 percent) of Parkinson's patients reported pesticide exposure, compared with 27 (5.3 percent) of those without the disease. The finding suggests an association between work-related pesticide exposure and increased risk of Parkinson's.

"Growing evidence suggests a causal association between pesticide use and parkinsonism. However, the term 'pesticide' is broad and includes chemicals with varied mechanisms," wrote Dr. Caroline M. Tanner of the Parkinson's Institute in Sunnyvale, Calif., and colleagues. "Because few investigations have identified specific pesticides, we studied eight pesticides with high neurotoxic plausibility based on laboratory findings. Use of these pesticides was associated with higher risk of parkinsonism, more than double that in those not exposed."

Three compounds -- an organic (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid), an herbicide (paraquat), and an insecticide (permethrin) -- were associated with a more than threefold increased risk of Parkinson's, the study found. Laboratory tests have shown that all three compounds have effects on dopaminergic neurons, which are affected by Parkinson's disease.

"This convergence of epidemiologic and laboratory data from experimental models of Parkinson's disease lends credence to a causative role of certain pesticides in the neurodegenerative process," Tanner and colleagues concluded. "Other pesticide exposures, such as hobby gardening, residential exposure, wearing treated garments or dietary intake, were not assessed. Because these exposures may affect more subjects, future attention is warranted."

The study appears in the September issue of the Archives of Neurology.

SOURCES: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, Sept. 14, 2009