ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Drinking Cuts Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
Too Few Screened for Abdominal Aneurysm, Study Says
Living Near Major Road May Boost Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
CANCER
Yoga Eases Sleep Problems Among Cancer Survivors
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
CAREGIVING
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
Injected Medication Errors a Major Problem
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
DIET, NUTRITION
Breakfast Eggs Keep Folks on Diet
Leafy Greens Top Risky Food List
Myrrh May Lower High Cholesterol
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Disinfectants Can Boost Bacteria's Resistance to Treatment
Hairspray Exposure Ups Risk for Birth Defect in Sons
Air Pollution Raises Risk of Heart Disease, Death
EYE CARE, VISION
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
FITNESS
MRSA Infections Can Bug Fitness Buffs
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Be Healthy, Spend Less
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
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Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children

New research suggests that exposure to high levels of organophosphate pesticides, commonly found on berries, celery and other produce, could raise the odds for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children.

At this point, though, there is no evidence that pesticide exposure can actually cause ADHD, stated the authors of a paper appearing in the June issue of Pediatrics.

Certainly parents and children shouldn't swear off fruits and veggies, said study lead author Maryse Bouchard, an adjunct researcher in the department of environmental and occupational health at the University of Montreal and at Sainte-Justine University Hospital Centre. However, "I think it's safe to say that we should as much as possible reduce our exposure to pesticides," she said.

That would meaning going organic, buying at farmers' markets and washing fruits and vegetables thoroughly before consuming them, she said.

"I always encourage my families to embrace healthy lifestyles in general," agreed Dr. Nakia Scott, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral science at Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine and a child psychiatrist with Lone Star Circle of Care. "I think it's much more important that they're eating fruits, vegetables, nuts and grains instead of sodas and fast foods and I'm not saying that they're not going to eat any produce because it might contain pesticides."

Previous research has shown an association between both prenatal and postnatal organophosphate exposure and developmental problems in young children.

But most prior studies have focused on excessive rather than average exposure to organophosphates.

"Organophosphates are one of the most widely used pesticides in agriculture to protect crops and fruits and vegetables," Bouchard noted. "For children, the major source of exposure would be the diet -- fruits and vegetables in particular."

In their study, Bouchard and her colleagues analyzed data on pesticide exposure and ADHD in more than 1,100 American children aged 8 to 15.

Children with higher pesticide levels in their urine were more likely to have ADHD, the team found.

"The analysis showed that the higher the level of exposure [as measured by metabolites in the urine], the higher the odds of having ADHD," Bouchard added.

Just how might pesticides harm brain development? According to the authors, high doses of organophosphates may inhibit acetylcholinesterase, a nervous system enzyme. Lower doses of the pesticide may affect different growth factors and neurotransmitters.

The findings, if replicated, may provide another clue into the causes of ADHD, a condition which affects three to seven percent of school-aged children, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"We do have a fair amount of evidence about other causes of ADHD," Scott said. "We know that ADHD is a highly heritable disorder. At least one-third of fathers who have had ADHD in their youth have a child with ADHD."

"There are also prenatal risks such as tobacco exposure and alcohol exposure," she added. "There's also a possibility that children who are exposed to high levels of lead prior to the age of six may develop ADHD."

SOURCES: Maryse Bouchard, Ph.D., adjunct researcher, department of environmental and occupational health, University of Montreal and Sainte-Justine University Hospital Centre, Canada; Nakia Scott, M.D., clinical assistant professor, psychiatry and behavioral science, Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, and child psychiatrist, Lone Star Circle of Care, College Station, Texas; June 2010 Pediatrics Published on: May 17, 2010