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Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
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Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
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Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
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Vitamin C Shows Promise as Cancer Treatment
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Reduce Suffering, Urge Heart Failure Patients and Caregivers
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
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Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
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What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
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Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
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Vitamin B12 Key to Aging Brain
Eat Light - Live Longer
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
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Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
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ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Hairspray Exposure Ups Risk for Birth Defect in Sons
Pesticides Linked to Parkinson's
EYE CARE, VISION
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
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Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Psychiatric Drugs Might Raise Cardiac Death Risk
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
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Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
When It Comes to Toys, Shop Smart, Shop Safe
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Countdown to Hair Loss
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
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Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children

New research suggests that exposure to high levels of organophosphate pesticides, commonly found on berries, celery and other produce, could raise the odds for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children.

At this point, though, there is no evidence that pesticide exposure can actually cause ADHD, stated the authors of a paper appearing in the June issue of Pediatrics.

Certainly parents and children shouldn't swear off fruits and veggies, said study lead author Maryse Bouchard, an adjunct researcher in the department of environmental and occupational health at the University of Montreal and at Sainte-Justine University Hospital Centre. However, "I think it's safe to say that we should as much as possible reduce our exposure to pesticides," she said.

That would meaning going organic, buying at farmers' markets and washing fruits and vegetables thoroughly before consuming them, she said.

"I always encourage my families to embrace healthy lifestyles in general," agreed Dr. Nakia Scott, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral science at Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine and a child psychiatrist with Lone Star Circle of Care. "I think it's much more important that they're eating fruits, vegetables, nuts and grains instead of sodas and fast foods and I'm not saying that they're not going to eat any produce because it might contain pesticides."

Previous research has shown an association between both prenatal and postnatal organophosphate exposure and developmental problems in young children.

But most prior studies have focused on excessive rather than average exposure to organophosphates.

"Organophosphates are one of the most widely used pesticides in agriculture to protect crops and fruits and vegetables," Bouchard noted. "For children, the major source of exposure would be the diet -- fruits and vegetables in particular."

In their study, Bouchard and her colleagues analyzed data on pesticide exposure and ADHD in more than 1,100 American children aged 8 to 15.

Children with higher pesticide levels in their urine were more likely to have ADHD, the team found.

"The analysis showed that the higher the level of exposure [as measured by metabolites in the urine], the higher the odds of having ADHD," Bouchard added.

Just how might pesticides harm brain development? According to the authors, high doses of organophosphates may inhibit acetylcholinesterase, a nervous system enzyme. Lower doses of the pesticide may affect different growth factors and neurotransmitters.

The findings, if replicated, may provide another clue into the causes of ADHD, a condition which affects three to seven percent of school-aged children, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"We do have a fair amount of evidence about other causes of ADHD," Scott said. "We know that ADHD is a highly heritable disorder. At least one-third of fathers who have had ADHD in their youth have a child with ADHD."

"There are also prenatal risks such as tobacco exposure and alcohol exposure," she added. "There's also a possibility that children who are exposed to high levels of lead prior to the age of six may develop ADHD."

SOURCES: Maryse Bouchard, Ph.D., adjunct researcher, department of environmental and occupational health, University of Montreal and Sainte-Justine University Hospital Centre, Canada; Nakia Scott, M.D., clinical assistant professor, psychiatry and behavioral science, Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, and child psychiatrist, Lone Star Circle of Care, College Station, Texas; June 2010 Pediatrics Published on: May 17, 2010