ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Pain More a Cause of Arthritis Than a Symptom
Breast-feeding Might Shield Women From Rheumatoid Arthritis
Brazilian Mint Tea Naturally Good for Pain Relief
CANCER
Scams and Shams That Prey on Cancer Patients
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Vitamin D May Improve Melanoma Survival
CAREGIVING
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
3 Steps Might Help Stop MRSA's Spread
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
DASH Diet Has Extra Benefits for Women's Health
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Many Kids Don't Need the Vitamins They're Taking
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Improved Fungicides May Be Easier on Environment
Prenatal Exposure to Traffic Pollution May Lead to Asthma
Pesticides Linked to Parkinson's
EYE CARE, VISION
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
FITNESS
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Swine Flu Fatality Rate a 'Little Bit' Higher Than That of Seasonal Flu
Maximize Your Run
Want Sun Protection? Wear Red or Blue
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Scary Toxins Make Halloween Face Paints Questionable
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Add your Article

Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer

Exercise appears to reduce the risk of death in male colon cancer survivors, researchers report.

The study, which began in January 1986, included 668 men who'd been treated for stage I, stage II or stage III colon cancer that had not spread (nonmetastatic cancer). Every two years, the men were sent questionnaires that asked them about any new cancer and disease diagnoses, as well as their physical activity. A metabolic equivalent task (MET) score was matched to each type of physical activity, with exercises that burned more energy receiving higher MET scores.

During the study period, which ended in January 2006, 258 of the participants died, including 88 who died from colon cancer.

"Men who were physically active after diagnosis of nonmetastatic colorectal cancer experienced a significantly decreased risk of colorectal cancer-specific death, as well as death from any cause," wrote Dr. Jeffrey A. Meyerhardt, of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, and colleagues.

"Men who engaged in more than 27 MET hours per week had more than 50 percent lower risk of colorectal cancer-specific mortality compared with inactive men. This association was consistently detected regardless of age, disease stage, body-mass index, diagnosis year, tumor location and prediagnosis physical activity," the study authors reported in the Dec. 14/28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

"These results provide further support that physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis may lower the risk of death from that disease," the researchers concluded. "A randomized study among high-risk stage II and stage III colon cancer survivors that will compare the use of general education materials with a program that includes supervised physical activity sessions and behavioral support delivered over three years will soon open; the primary endpoint is disease-free survival. The findings from the present study further support that effort."

SOURCES: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, Dec. 14/28, 2009 Published on: December 14, 2009