ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
Needling Away Your Headaches With Acupuncture
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Rheumatoid Arthritis Hits Women Harder
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue
CANCER
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Vitamin C Shows Promise as Cancer Treatment
CAREGIVING
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
DIABETES
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
DIET, NUTRITION
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Adults Need To Get Thier Food Facts Straight
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Chemical in Plastics May Cause Fertility Problems
EYE CARE, VISION
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
FITNESS
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
Bursts of Vigorous Activity Appear to Be a 'Stress-Buffer'
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Good Sleepers More Likely to Eat Right
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Treat Kids to a Safe Halloween
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Add your Article

Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer

Exercise appears to reduce the risk of death in male colon cancer survivors, researchers report.

The study, which began in January 1986, included 668 men who'd been treated for stage I, stage II or stage III colon cancer that had not spread (nonmetastatic cancer). Every two years, the men were sent questionnaires that asked them about any new cancer and disease diagnoses, as well as their physical activity. A metabolic equivalent task (MET) score was matched to each type of physical activity, with exercises that burned more energy receiving higher MET scores.

During the study period, which ended in January 2006, 258 of the participants died, including 88 who died from colon cancer.

"Men who were physically active after diagnosis of nonmetastatic colorectal cancer experienced a significantly decreased risk of colorectal cancer-specific death, as well as death from any cause," wrote Dr. Jeffrey A. Meyerhardt, of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, and colleagues.

"Men who engaged in more than 27 MET hours per week had more than 50 percent lower risk of colorectal cancer-specific mortality compared with inactive men. This association was consistently detected regardless of age, disease stage, body-mass index, diagnosis year, tumor location and prediagnosis physical activity," the study authors reported in the Dec. 14/28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

"These results provide further support that physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis may lower the risk of death from that disease," the researchers concluded. "A randomized study among high-risk stage II and stage III colon cancer survivors that will compare the use of general education materials with a program that includes supervised physical activity sessions and behavioral support delivered over three years will soon open; the primary endpoint is disease-free survival. The findings from the present study further support that effort."

SOURCES: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, Dec. 14/28, 2009 Published on: December 14, 2009