ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Brazilian Mint Tea Naturally Good for Pain Relief
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
CANCER
Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Healthy Behaviors Slow Functional Decline After Cancer
CAREGIVING
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
DIABETES
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
10 Beginner Tips for Fast Weight Loss, the Low-Carb Way!
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Holiday Eating Without the Guilt -- or the Pounds
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
Think You Are Lead-Free? Check Your Soil
EYE CARE, VISION
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
FITNESS
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Exercise Guards White Blood Cells Against Aging
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Sleep and Do Better
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
Omega-3, Some Omega-6 Fatty Acids Boost Cardiovascular Health
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
Help Your Kids Stay Active
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Any Old Cane Won't Do
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
Add your Article

Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer

Exercise appears to reduce the risk of death in male colon cancer survivors, researchers report.

The study, which began in January 1986, included 668 men who'd been treated for stage I, stage II or stage III colon cancer that had not spread (nonmetastatic cancer). Every two years, the men were sent questionnaires that asked them about any new cancer and disease diagnoses, as well as their physical activity. A metabolic equivalent task (MET) score was matched to each type of physical activity, with exercises that burned more energy receiving higher MET scores.

During the study period, which ended in January 2006, 258 of the participants died, including 88 who died from colon cancer.

"Men who were physically active after diagnosis of nonmetastatic colorectal cancer experienced a significantly decreased risk of colorectal cancer-specific death, as well as death from any cause," wrote Dr. Jeffrey A. Meyerhardt, of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, and colleagues.

"Men who engaged in more than 27 MET hours per week had more than 50 percent lower risk of colorectal cancer-specific mortality compared with inactive men. This association was consistently detected regardless of age, disease stage, body-mass index, diagnosis year, tumor location and prediagnosis physical activity," the study authors reported in the Dec. 14/28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

"These results provide further support that physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis may lower the risk of death from that disease," the researchers concluded. "A randomized study among high-risk stage II and stage III colon cancer survivors that will compare the use of general education materials with a program that includes supervised physical activity sessions and behavioral support delivered over three years will soon open; the primary endpoint is disease-free survival. The findings from the present study further support that effort."

SOURCES: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, Dec. 14/28, 2009 Published on: December 14, 2009