ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Vitamin D May Improve Melanoma Survival
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
CAREGIVING
Babies Born in High Pollen Months at Wheezing Risk
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
Flu Strikes a Milder Blow This Season
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
DIET, NUTRITION
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
The Best Diet? That Depends on You
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
Sunken, Unexploded Bombs Pose Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
FITNESS
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
Go To Work But Skip The Car
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Add your Article

Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer

Exercise appears to reduce the risk of death in male colon cancer survivors, researchers report.

The study, which began in January 1986, included 668 men who'd been treated for stage I, stage II or stage III colon cancer that had not spread (nonmetastatic cancer). Every two years, the men were sent questionnaires that asked them about any new cancer and disease diagnoses, as well as their physical activity. A metabolic equivalent task (MET) score was matched to each type of physical activity, with exercises that burned more energy receiving higher MET scores.

During the study period, which ended in January 2006, 258 of the participants died, including 88 who died from colon cancer.

"Men who were physically active after diagnosis of nonmetastatic colorectal cancer experienced a significantly decreased risk of colorectal cancer-specific death, as well as death from any cause," wrote Dr. Jeffrey A. Meyerhardt, of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, and colleagues.

"Men who engaged in more than 27 MET hours per week had more than 50 percent lower risk of colorectal cancer-specific mortality compared with inactive men. This association was consistently detected regardless of age, disease stage, body-mass index, diagnosis year, tumor location and prediagnosis physical activity," the study authors reported in the Dec. 14/28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

"These results provide further support that physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis may lower the risk of death from that disease," the researchers concluded. "A randomized study among high-risk stage II and stage III colon cancer survivors that will compare the use of general education materials with a program that includes supervised physical activity sessions and behavioral support delivered over three years will soon open; the primary endpoint is disease-free survival. The findings from the present study further support that effort."

SOURCES: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, Dec. 14/28, 2009 Published on: December 14, 2009