ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
Acupuncture May Not Help Hot Flashes
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Vitamin C Shows Promise as Cancer Treatment
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering
CAREGIVING
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
DIET, NUTRITION
B Vitamins Might Lower Stroke Risk
Herb Shows Potential for Rheumatoid Arthriti
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Arsenic in Drinking Water Raises Diabetes Risk
Climate Change Linked to Longer Pollen Seasons
Hurricane Threats: Time to Batten Down the Hatches
EYE CARE, VISION
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
FITNESS
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
Exercise Guards White Blood Cells Against Aging
Avoiding a Holiday Season of Discontent
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Relief for Painful Menstrual Cramps
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
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Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls

(HealthDay News) -- In the latest study to suggest an association between the plastics chemical bisphenol A (BPA) and adverse effects on humans, researchers report that BPA may affect the behavior of little girls.

Girls exposed to higher levels of BPA displayed more "externalizing" behaviors, such as aggression and hyperactivity, according to the study, which is published in the Oct. 6 online edition of Environmental Health Perspectives.

"We found almost all of the women [in the study] had detectable levels of bisphenol A in at least one of the tests, and elevated concentrations were associated with externalizing behaviors in female children," said study author Joe Braun, a graduate student and research assistant in epidemiology at the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Not everyone agreed with the study's conclusions, however.

"This type of study has no capability to establish cause and effect, only associations. At the end of the study, the authors even point out that the results 'should be viewed cautiously,'" noted Steven Hentges, executive director of the polycarbonate/BPA global group at the American Chemistry Council, which represents the chemicals industry.

BPA is a commonly used chemical that's found in hard plastics and epoxy resins. The chemical is used in water bottles, food containers, infant bottles and medical devices. BPA may also be found in the lining of canned foods. Most human exposure comes through diet when the chemical leaches into food and beverages from the containers, according to the U.S. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. Previous studies suggest that more than 90 percent of people in the United States have detectable levels of BPA in their urine.

Animal studies of the chemical have found an association between BPA and adverse neurodevelopmental effects on fetuses and newborns, according to background information in the study.

The current study included 249 pregnant women from Cincinnati, Ohio, who were part of another study that was evaluating interventions to reduce lead levels. Urine samples were collected when the mothers were 16 and 26 weeks pregnant, as well as within 24 hours of birth.

Ninety-nine percent of the women had at least one urine sample with detectable levels of BPA, according to the study.

The children's behavior was reported by the parents using a standardized questionnaire when the children were 2 years old.

After controlling the data to account for numerous possible confounding factors, such as maternal age, race, education and income levels, the researchers didn't find an association between BPA and externalizing behaviors. However, when they split the data by sex, they noted an association between higher BPA levels and more externalizing behaviors in girls.

Braun said that the researchers don't know why there was a difference in the findings by sex, nor did they know what the potential biological mechanism might be that could cause an increase in aggressive behaviors after BPA exposure.

The researchers did not adjust the data in this study to account for lead exposure, diet or after-birth exposure to BPA. Braun said that the researchers did test additional statistical models to account for lead exposure that weren't included in the paper, and he said that when this was done lead levels didn't change their findings.

However, "once you consider the limitations of the study, as the authors carefully do, there's significant potential for false positives," contended Hentges.

Braun said that parents who are worried about the potential for harm can look for products that specify that they're "BPA-free." He said the chemical is found in many different consumer products and there are no requirements that it be listed on a label, so if a product doesn't clearly state that it doesn't contain BPA, it may be made with the chemical. One known source of BPA is plastics with the number 7 in the recycling symbol.

SOURCES: Joe Braun, M.S.P.H., graduate student, research assistant, department of epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N.C.; Steven Hentges, executive director, polycarbonate/BPA global group, American Chemistry Council, Arlington, Va.; Oct. 6, 2009, Environmental Health Perspectives, online Published on: October 06, 2009