ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Ginkgo No Shield Against Alzheimer's
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Stem Cells Might Treat Tough Fractures
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
CANCER
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
Gene Screen May Predict Colon Cancer's Return
CAREGIVING
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
Six Healthy-Sounding Foods That Really Aren't
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Controversial Chemical Lingers Longer in the Body
Vest Monitors 'Individual' Air Pollution
Global Warming Biggest Health Threat of 21st Century, Experts Say
EYE CARE, VISION
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
FITNESS
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
What you need to know about swine flu.
Have Fun But Put Play It Safe on the 4th
Want Sun Protection? Wear Red or Blue
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
The Unmedicated Mind
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
SENIORS
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Natural Relief for Painful Menstrual Cramps
Add your Article

Pollution Particles Impair Blood Vessel Function

WEDNESDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Just a few hours of exposure to particulate matter air pollution can increase blood pressure and harm blood vessel function within 24 hours, a new study finds.

The findings may explain why air pollution can trigger a range of cardiovascular events such as heart attack, heart failure and stroke, the researchers said.

Particulate matter (PM) is a component of air pollution emitted from vehicles, power plants, and factories. It's believe that PM is the 13th leading cause of death worldwide, but the link between PM and death hasn't been well understood.

"Not everyone is equally at risk to the effects of poor air quality," researcher Robert Brook, an assistant professor of medicine, division of cardiovascular medicine, University of Michigan, said in a prepared statement.

"Yet, as traffic worsens and millions of vulnerable people are exposed to PM, it is incumbent upon us to understand how and why people are affected so that we can take steps to limit our personal exposure -- and consider making broader changes to the public agenda to control air pollution," Brook said.

In the study, researchers looked at adults living in Toronto and Ann Arbor, Mich.

In Toronto, 30 adults, aged 18 to 50, were exposed for two hours to concentrated ambient PM (CAPS alone), CAPS and ozone, ozone alone, or filtered air. Exposure to air pollution that contains PM (CAP or CAP and ozone) resulted in an average diastolic blood pressure increase of 3.6 mm/Hg. Blood vessel function was impaired 24 hours after (but not immediately after) all exposures to all exposures containing PM, but not ozone alone.

In Ann Arbor, 50 adults were pre-treated with either the antioxidant vitamin C -- which blocks the vasoconstrictor hormone endothelin (bosentan) -- or placebo. Diastolic blood pressure increased between 2.5 and 4.0 mm/Hg during all exposures. However, blood pressure function was not impaired at any time after all exposures, and blood pressure returned to normal within 10 minutes after exposure.

The fact that vitamin C didn't block the blood pressure response suggests that it's likely caused by a sudden increase in sympathetic nervous system activity.

The findings confirm that PM, not ozone, is responsible for the rapid increase in diastolic blood pressure and that this occurs only during actual inhalation of PM. The research also confirms that PM impairs blood vessel function one day after exposure. However, this blood vessel function response occurred only in Toronto, which suggests that the composition of PM or its source may play a role in determining that kind of response, the researchers said.

The study was expected to be presented Wednesday at the American Society of Hypertension annual meeting, in New Orleans.

"These findings are a springboard for further study that will specifically determine how the sympathetic nervous system responds and to what types of particles in air pollution," Brook said. "But this glimpse helps us determine the triggers behind a range of CV events -- some deadly. Learning how this dangerous cascade starts can help the medical and public health community make advances toward limiting their impact in the future."

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about air pollution and health.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Society of Hypertension, news release, May 14, 2008

Last Updated: May 14, 2008

Copyright 2008 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com