ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
Acupuncture Eases Breast Cancer Treatment Side Effects
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Winter Is Tough on Feet
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones
CANCER
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
CAREGIVING
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
DIABETES
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
DIET, NUTRITION
Oregano Shown to be the Most Powerful Culinary Herb
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
Fasting on Alternate Days May Make Dieting Easier
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
Hypertension May Hit Black Males Earlier
Seasons Arriving 2 Days Earlier, Study Says
EYE CARE, VISION
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
Magnetic Pulses to Brain Improve Lazy Eye in Adults
FITNESS
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Coffee Cuts Liver Scarring in Hepatitis C
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Ginkgo Won't Prevent Heart Attack, Stroke in Elderly
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Natural Therapies for Menopause
Add your Article

Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk

Replacing saturated fats with polyunsaturated fats may reduce your risk of heart disease, new research suggests.

Harvard School of Public Health researchers reviewed eight studies with a total of 13,614 participants and found that those who replaced saturated fats in their diet with polyunsaturated fats had a 19 percent lower risk of coronary heart disease than those who didn't make the switch.

For every 5 percent increase in polyunsaturated fat consumption -- found in most vegetable oils -- coronary heart disease risk was reduced by 10 percent, according to the study published online March 23 in the journal PLoS Medicine.

For nearly six decades, Americans have been advised to reduce their consumption of saturated fats, such as butter, to prevent heart disease, but there has been little scientific proof that doing so actually decreased heart disease risk, according to the researchers. They said this study provides conclusive evidence from randomized clinical trials that there is a benefit in switching from saturated fats to polyunsaturated fats.

Over the past few decades, saturated fats in the American diet were generally replaced with increased consumption of refined carbohydrates and grains.

"The specific replacement nutrient for saturated fat may be very important. Our findings suggest that polyunsaturated fats would be a preferred replacement for saturated fats for better heart health," study lead author Dariush Mozaffarian, an assistant professor in the epidemiology department at the Harvard School of Public Health and in the department of medicine at Harvard Medical School, said in a news release.

SOURCES: Harvard School of Public Health, news release, March 22, 2010 Published on: March 23, 2010