ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
Vitamin D Plus Calcium Guards Against Fractures
High Birth Weight Doubles Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer
CAREGIVING
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Health Tip: After Liposuction
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
Many Kids Don't Need the Vitamins They're Taking
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
Antioxidants Abound in Cereals, Popcorn, Whole-Grain Snacks
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Population-Based Strategy Urged to Cut U.S. Obesity Rate
Seasons Arriving 2 Days Earlier, Study Says
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
FITNESS
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
After Job Loss, People Report More Health Issues
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
When It Comes to Toys, Shop Smart, Shop Safe
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Optimism May Boost Immune System
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
Add your Article

Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk

Replacing saturated fats with polyunsaturated fats may reduce your risk of heart disease, new research suggests.

Harvard School of Public Health researchers reviewed eight studies with a total of 13,614 participants and found that those who replaced saturated fats in their diet with polyunsaturated fats had a 19 percent lower risk of coronary heart disease than those who didn't make the switch.

For every 5 percent increase in polyunsaturated fat consumption -- found in most vegetable oils -- coronary heart disease risk was reduced by 10 percent, according to the study published online March 23 in the journal PLoS Medicine.

For nearly six decades, Americans have been advised to reduce their consumption of saturated fats, such as butter, to prevent heart disease, but there has been little scientific proof that doing so actually decreased heart disease risk, according to the researchers. They said this study provides conclusive evidence from randomized clinical trials that there is a benefit in switching from saturated fats to polyunsaturated fats.

Over the past few decades, saturated fats in the American diet were generally replaced with increased consumption of refined carbohydrates and grains.

"The specific replacement nutrient for saturated fat may be very important. Our findings suggest that polyunsaturated fats would be a preferred replacement for saturated fats for better heart health," study lead author Dariush Mozaffarian, an assistant professor in the epidemiology department at the Harvard School of Public Health and in the department of medicine at Harvard Medical School, said in a news release.

SOURCES: Harvard School of Public Health, news release, March 22, 2010 Published on: March 23, 2010