ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
CANCER
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
CAREGIVING
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
DIABETES
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Caffeine May Offer Some Skin Cancer Protection
The Food Irradiation Story
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Disinfectants Can Boost Bacteria's Resistance to Treatment
Improved Fungicides May Be Easier on Environment
Chemicals in Carpets, Non-Stick Pans Tied to Thyroid Disease
EYE CARE, VISION
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
FITNESS
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Seniors Who Exercise Help Their Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Maximize Your Run
Vitamin D and Bone Health: Are You Getting Enough of This Important Vitamin?
When Clocks Change, Body May Need Time to Adjust
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
SENIORS
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Add your Article

Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes

MONDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- Maintaining proper blood sugar levels after heart surgery is essential, whether one is or isn't a diabetic, a new study shows.

The British report, published in Circulation, shows that poor blood sugar control in post-heart surgery patients is linked to a fourfold increase in death and major complications, such as heart attack, neurological, kidney, lung and gastrointestinal injury.

The research, involving 9,000 heart surgery patients, was conducted by a team at the University of Bristol in the U.K. More than half of the patients who developed moderate to poor blood sugar control after surgery were not thought to be diabetic, the researchers found.

Diabetes has long been tied to post-heart surgery problem. Many advances in operative and intensive care techniques for diabetic heart patients have been implemented in recent years.

"Currently, the absence of recognized guidelines is creating confusion on how to face the challenge of clinical conditions other than diabetes leading to derangement of glucose metabolism. The lack of rigorous research in this field does not help," lead researcher Raimondo Ascione, reader and consultant in Cardiac Surgery at the Bristol Heart Institute, said in a news release issued by the university.

He called for doctors to issue strict protocols to actively manage blood sugar in all patients admitted for major surgery.

Peter Weissberg is medical director of the British Heart Foundation, which co-funded the study. In the same news release, he noted that, "while previous research has shown blood sugar levels have an important impact on the outcome of patients suffering a heart attack, this study shows for the first time the same may also be true for patients undergoing heart surgery.

"This research provides the basis for further, in depth studies to try to understand how better sugar control can help save more lives during and after heart surger," he said.

More information

The National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse has more about diabetes and heart disease.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: University of Bristol, news release, July 8, 2008

Last Updated: July 14, 2008

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