ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
A Winning Strategy to Beat Spring Sporting Injuries
CANCER
Vitamin D May Lower Colon Cancer Risk
Study Cites Gains in Gall Bladder Cancer Treatment
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
Injected Medication Errors a Major Problem
U.S. Mental Health Spending Rises, But Many Still Left Out
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
DIET, NUTRITION
Even in 'Last Supper,' Portion Sizes Have Grown
More Educated Choose Healthier Foods, But Pay More
Keep Stress Off the Holiday Meal Menu, Expert Advises
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Greenhouse Gases Hazardous to Your Health
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Improved Fungicides May Be Easier on Environment
EYE CARE, VISION
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
Magnetic Pulses to Brain Improve Lazy Eye in Adults
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
FITNESS
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
Less Education May Mean Poorer Health
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
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Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes

MONDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- Maintaining proper blood sugar levels after heart surgery is essential, whether one is or isn't a diabetic, a new study shows.

The British report, published in Circulation, shows that poor blood sugar control in post-heart surgery patients is linked to a fourfold increase in death and major complications, such as heart attack, neurological, kidney, lung and gastrointestinal injury.

The research, involving 9,000 heart surgery patients, was conducted by a team at the University of Bristol in the U.K. More than half of the patients who developed moderate to poor blood sugar control after surgery were not thought to be diabetic, the researchers found.

Diabetes has long been tied to post-heart surgery problem. Many advances in operative and intensive care techniques for diabetic heart patients have been implemented in recent years.

"Currently, the absence of recognized guidelines is creating confusion on how to face the challenge of clinical conditions other than diabetes leading to derangement of glucose metabolism. The lack of rigorous research in this field does not help," lead researcher Raimondo Ascione, reader and consultant in Cardiac Surgery at the Bristol Heart Institute, said in a news release issued by the university.

He called for doctors to issue strict protocols to actively manage blood sugar in all patients admitted for major surgery.

Peter Weissberg is medical director of the British Heart Foundation, which co-funded the study. In the same news release, he noted that, "while previous research has shown blood sugar levels have an important impact on the outcome of patients suffering a heart attack, this study shows for the first time the same may also be true for patients undergoing heart surgery.

"This research provides the basis for further, in depth studies to try to understand how better sugar control can help save more lives during and after heart surger," he said.

More information

The National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse has more about diabetes and heart disease.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: University of Bristol, news release, July 8, 2008

Last Updated: July 14, 2008

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