ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Genes May Help Drive Rotator Cuff Injury
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
'Snowbirds' Beware the Climate Changes
CANCER
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
CAREGIVING
For Dialysis Patients, More Pills = Lower Quality of Life
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
DIABETES
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
DIET, NUTRITION
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Atkins Diet Tougher on Heart After Weight Loss
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Database Helps Assess Your Breast Cancer Risk
Global Warming Linked to Heightened Kidney Stone Risk
Topical Drugs May Pollute Waterways
EYE CARE, VISION
Antioxidant-Rich Diet May Protect Against Eye Disease
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
FITNESS
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
Walking Golf Course Affects Swing, Performance
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Sun, Smoke, Extra Weight Add Years to Skin
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Add your Article

Population-Based Strategy Urged to Cut U.S. Obesity Rate

MONDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing the high rate of obesity in the United States requires a comprehensive, population-based strategy, says a new American Heart Association (AHA) scientific statement.

The AHA also recommends a wide range of approaches to help people adopt healthy behaviors, such as eating right and being physically active.

About 67 million Americans are obese, and an additional 75 million are overweight, according to the 2001-04 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

"Almost all of our current eating or activity patterns are those that promote weight gain -- using the least possible amount of energy or maximizing quantity rather than quality in terms of food," Shiriki Kumanyika, chair of the statement working group, said in a prepared statement. "People haven't just made the decision to eat more and move less; the social structure has played into people's tendencies to go for convenience foods and labor-saving devices."

Making policy and environmental changes at the local, state and federal levels could help boost healthy eating and physical activity without requiring deliberate action by individuals.

"We're not talking about creating a dieting society, but looking at choices people make in day-to-day living that affect their ability to manage their weight and then trying to change the environment to facilitate healthier choices," said Kumanyika, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in Philadelphia.

The statement outlines the following areas to identify targets for change:

* Locations of fast food restaurants.
* Restaurant portion sizes
* Availability of high-fat, low-fiber foods and sweetened drinks.
* Community design and infrastructure, which involves assessing land-use mix and walkability of neighborhoods, including: adequate sidewalks and areas for physical activity; accessibility of jobs, schools and recreation by walking or cycling; availability of public transportation.

"The concept of population-level interventions to change contexts for individual behavior is well-known from the experience with tobacco regulations," Kumanyika said. "Changes in these areas can eventually become 'normal' and displace the current 'normal' ways of doing things. Right now, you have to be pretty single-minded to make some of these choices, such as walking or riding a bike instead of driving. We advocate changes that will move the social norm to where physical activity is the custom."

The statement was published in the current issue of Circulation.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about the importance of healthy eating and exercise.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, June 30, 2008

Last Updated: June 30, 2008

Copyright © 2008 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com