ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
Traditional Chinese Therapy May Help Ease Eczema
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
B Cells Can Act Alone in Autoimmune Diseases
Healthy adults have potential autoimmune disease-causing cells
CANCER
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease
CAREGIVING
With Age Comes Greater Risk of Hypothermia
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
Database Helps Assess Your Breast Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
FITNESS
Be Healthy, Spend Less
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
Basketball Star Details His Struggle With Gout
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
When It Comes to Toys, Shop Smart, Shop Safe
Help Your Kids Stay Active
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
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Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation

Positive brain changes take hold after just 11 hours of practicing a form of meditation, the results of a new study suggest.
The study included 45 University of Oregon students who were randomly selected to be in either a study group that did integrative body-mind training (IBMT) or a control group that did relaxation training. IBMT was adapted from traditional Chinese medicine in the 1990s.
A comparison of scans taken of the students' brains before and after the training showed that those in the IBMT group had increased brain connectivity. The changes were strongest in connections involving the anterior cingulate, an area that plays a role in the regulation of emotions and behavior, Yi-Yuan Tang of Dalian University of Technology in China, University of Oregon psychologist Michael I. Posner, and colleagues found.
The boost in brain connectivity began after six hours of IBMT and became more apparent after 11 hours of practice, according to the report published in the Aug. 16-21 online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
The meditation-induced changes may be due to a reorganization of white-matter tracts or due to an increase of myelin that surrounds the brain connections, the study authors suggested.
"The importance of our finding relates to the ability to make structural changes in a brain network related to self-regulation. The pathway that has the largest change due to IBMT is one that previously was shown to relate to individual differences in the person's ability to regulate conflict," Posner said in a university news release.