ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Almost Half of Adults Will Develop Knee Osteoarthritis by 85
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
Vitamin D Plus Calcium Guards Against Fractures
CANCER
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
CAREGIVING
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
Are Hospital Mobile Phones Dialing Up Superbugs?
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
The Food Irradiation Story
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Added Sugars in Diet Threaten Heart Health
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Air Pollution Raises Risk of Heart Disease, Death
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
EYE CARE, VISION
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
FITNESS
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Bursts of Vigorous Activity Appear to Be a 'Stress-Buffer'
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
What you need to know about swine flu.
Week of Historic Senate Hearings on Integrative Medicine May Open New Doors
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
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Pregnant Rural Women More at Risk

FRIDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Living in a rural area may increase a woman's chance of developing preeclampsia and other pregnancy-related blood pressure disorders by 56 percent, a new study says.

The six-year study on women who gave birth in Colorado also found that those with some college education had a 19 percent great chance of having preeclampsia and pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) than those with only a high school education. The rate was also higher, but not statistically significant, for women with more than a college education.

The findings were presented at the American Society of Nephrology's recent annual meeting in Philadelphia.

Several factors, such as older age, giving birth to multiple babies and excessive weight gain, are known risk factors for preeclampsia and PIH and were validated in this new study. The ties to rural living, though, were new, and one researcher suggested it may be associated with maternal poverty and social deprivation.

"Although traditional risk factors for preeclampsia and PIH are well recognized, these diseases remain enigmatic, and there is no known effective way to reduce their incidence," lead researcher Dr. Rebecca Moore, of the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver, said in a news release. "Nontraditional risk factors may be of great importance in the design of future interventions to prevent the occurrence of PIH and preeclampsia, but data regarding these risk factors are scarce."

Preeclampsia causes rapid increases in blood pressure, along with kidney damage. Although it's a very common condition and the third most common cause of maternal death in the United States, its cause is unknown. It has no cure, but it usually resolves after delivery.

More information

The Preeclampsia Foundation has more about preeclampsia.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: American Society of Nephrology, news release, Nov. 8, 2008

Last Updated: Nov. 14, 2008

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