ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Drinking Cuts Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
CANCER
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
CAREGIVING
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Omega-3 Fatty Acid May Help 'Preemie' Girls' Brains
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
DIABETES
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Quick Weight Loss May Be Best for Long-Term Success
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Population-Based Strategy Urged to Cut U.S. Obesity Rate
Hurricane Threats: Time to Batten Down the Hatches
Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Good Sleepers More Likely to Eat Right
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Tune Up Your Health With Music
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
MENTAL HEALTH
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
SENIORS
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
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Pregnant Rural Women More at Risk

FRIDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Living in a rural area may increase a woman's chance of developing preeclampsia and other pregnancy-related blood pressure disorders by 56 percent, a new study says.

The six-year study on women who gave birth in Colorado also found that those with some college education had a 19 percent great chance of having preeclampsia and pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) than those with only a high school education. The rate was also higher, but not statistically significant, for women with more than a college education.

The findings were presented at the American Society of Nephrology's recent annual meeting in Philadelphia.

Several factors, such as older age, giving birth to multiple babies and excessive weight gain, are known risk factors for preeclampsia and PIH and were validated in this new study. The ties to rural living, though, were new, and one researcher suggested it may be associated with maternal poverty and social deprivation.

"Although traditional risk factors for preeclampsia and PIH are well recognized, these diseases remain enigmatic, and there is no known effective way to reduce their incidence," lead researcher Dr. Rebecca Moore, of the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver, said in a news release. "Nontraditional risk factors may be of great importance in the design of future interventions to prevent the occurrence of PIH and preeclampsia, but data regarding these risk factors are scarce."

Preeclampsia causes rapid increases in blood pressure, along with kidney damage. Although it's a very common condition and the third most common cause of maternal death in the United States, its cause is unknown. It has no cure, but it usually resolves after delivery.

More information

The Preeclampsia Foundation has more about preeclampsia.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: American Society of Nephrology, news release, Nov. 8, 2008

Last Updated: Nov. 14, 2008

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