ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
High Birth Weight Doubles Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
CANCER
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
CAREGIVING
For Dialysis Patients, More Pills = Lower Quality of Life
Simpler Sleep Apnea Treatment Seems Effective, Affordable
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
DIET, NUTRITION
Successful Weight Loss Shows Unique Brain Patterns
Is Your Refrigerator Getting Enough Attention For Your Raw Food Success?
Eat Up, But Eat Healthy This Holiday Season
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Main Ingredients in Household Dust Come From Outdoors
Topical Drugs May Pollute Waterways
EYE CARE, VISION
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Almost Two-Thirds of Americans Meet Exercise Guidelines
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Eat Light - Live Longer
Food and Water Supply Poisoned by Perchlorate
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Don't Leave Your Kids In The Car !
MEN'S HEALTH
Countdown to Hair Loss
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Drink Away Dementia?
Using the Mind to Heal the Heart
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
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Pregnant Rural Women More at Risk

FRIDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Living in a rural area may increase a woman's chance of developing preeclampsia and other pregnancy-related blood pressure disorders by 56 percent, a new study says.

The six-year study on women who gave birth in Colorado also found that those with some college education had a 19 percent great chance of having preeclampsia and pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) than those with only a high school education. The rate was also higher, but not statistically significant, for women with more than a college education.

The findings were presented at the American Society of Nephrology's recent annual meeting in Philadelphia.

Several factors, such as older age, giving birth to multiple babies and excessive weight gain, are known risk factors for preeclampsia and PIH and were validated in this new study. The ties to rural living, though, were new, and one researcher suggested it may be associated with maternal poverty and social deprivation.

"Although traditional risk factors for preeclampsia and PIH are well recognized, these diseases remain enigmatic, and there is no known effective way to reduce their incidence," lead researcher Dr. Rebecca Moore, of the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver, said in a news release. "Nontraditional risk factors may be of great importance in the design of future interventions to prevent the occurrence of PIH and preeclampsia, but data regarding these risk factors are scarce."

Preeclampsia causes rapid increases in blood pressure, along with kidney damage. Although it's a very common condition and the third most common cause of maternal death in the United States, its cause is unknown. It has no cure, but it usually resolves after delivery.

More information

The Preeclampsia Foundation has more about preeclampsia.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: American Society of Nephrology, news release, Nov. 8, 2008

Last Updated: Nov. 14, 2008

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