ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Barefoot Lifestyle Has Its Dangers
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
B Cells Can Act Alone in Autoimmune Diseases
CANCER
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
Gene Studies Reveal Cancer's Secrets
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
CAREGIVING
Bariatric Surgery Centers Don't Deliver Better Outcomes
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
Children's Bath Products Contain Contaminants
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
DIABETES
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
DIET, NUTRITION
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Mediterranean Diet Helps Protect Aging Brain
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Air Pollution Exposure May Slow Fetal Growth
Chemical in Plastics May Cause Fertility Problems
Rainy Areas in U.S. Show Higher Autism Rates
EYE CARE, VISION
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
FITNESS
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
Have Fun But Put Play It Safe on the 4th
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
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Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Amyloid protein deposits in the brain play a role in disrupting the memory formation process long before a person shows symptoms of the memory impairment of Alzheimer's disease, a new study contends.

Previous research had suggested that clumps of amyloid protein, which damage neurons and are characteristic of Alzheimer's disease, begin appearing many years before Alzheimer's symptoms appear. But the link between the deposits and memory impairment had not been clearly demonstrated in humans.

In the new study, which appears in the July 30 issue of Neuron, U.S. researchers used medical imaging to examine the brains of older people who did not have significant memory impairment.

"Two recent advances in neuroimaging now allow us to explore the early, asymptomatic phase of [Alzheimer's disease], the ability to measure amyloid distribution in living humans and the identification of sensitive markers of brain dysfunction" in the disease, Dr. Reisa Sperling, of the Center for Alzheimer's Research and Treatment at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and lead author of the study, said in a news release from the journal's publisher.

The researchers found that a number of study participants had amyloid deposits and abnormal activity in areas of the brain believed to be involved in memory function.

The results could help in efforts to find ways to predict and treat cognitive decline in people at risk for Alzheimer's, the study authors noted.

"Longitudinal studies are certainly needed, but our findings are consistent with the premise that cognitively intact older individuals with amyloid pathology may already be in the early stages of [Alzheimer's disease]," Sperling said. "The combination of molecular and functional imaging techniques may prove useful in monitoring disease progression prior to significant clinical symptoms, as well as the response to amyloid-modifying therapeutic agents in subjects at risk for developing [Alzheimer's disease]."

SOURCES: Cell Press, news release, July 29, 2009