ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Stem Cells Might Treat Tough Fractures
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
New Clues to How Fish Oils Help Arthritis Patients
CANCER
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
CAREGIVING
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
DIABETES
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
DIET, NUTRITION
Mediterranean Diet Enriched With Nuts Cuts Heart Risks
Vitamin D Vital for the Heart
Antioxidant-Rich Foods Lose Nutritional Luster Over Time
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Old-Growth Forests Dying Off in U.S. West
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Arsenic in Drinking Water Raises Diabetes Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
Maximize Your Run
Barefoot Best for Running?
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Heavy Alcohol Use Linked to Cancer
New Methods Could Speed Production of Flu Vaccines
Keep Fire Safety in Mind as You Celebrate
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Quick Orthopedic Repair Can Save Young Shoulders
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
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Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Amyloid protein deposits in the brain play a role in disrupting the memory formation process long before a person shows symptoms of the memory impairment of Alzheimer's disease, a new study contends.

Previous research had suggested that clumps of amyloid protein, which damage neurons and are characteristic of Alzheimer's disease, begin appearing many years before Alzheimer's symptoms appear. But the link between the deposits and memory impairment had not been clearly demonstrated in humans.

In the new study, which appears in the July 30 issue of Neuron, U.S. researchers used medical imaging to examine the brains of older people who did not have significant memory impairment.

"Two recent advances in neuroimaging now allow us to explore the early, asymptomatic phase of [Alzheimer's disease], the ability to measure amyloid distribution in living humans and the identification of sensitive markers of brain dysfunction" in the disease, Dr. Reisa Sperling, of the Center for Alzheimer's Research and Treatment at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and lead author of the study, said in a news release from the journal's publisher.

The researchers found that a number of study participants had amyloid deposits and abnormal activity in areas of the brain believed to be involved in memory function.

The results could help in efforts to find ways to predict and treat cognitive decline in people at risk for Alzheimer's, the study authors noted.

"Longitudinal studies are certainly needed, but our findings are consistent with the premise that cognitively intact older individuals with amyloid pathology may already be in the early stages of [Alzheimer's disease]," Sperling said. "The combination of molecular and functional imaging techniques may prove useful in monitoring disease progression prior to significant clinical symptoms, as well as the response to amyloid-modifying therapeutic agents in subjects at risk for developing [Alzheimer's disease]."

SOURCES: Cell Press, news release, July 29, 2009