ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
B Cells Can Act Alone in Autoimmune Diseases
Get in Step With Summer Foot Care
CANCER
Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease
Scams and Shams That Prey on Cancer Patients
Healthy Behaviors Slow Functional Decline After Cancer
CAREGIVING
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
Injected Medication Errors a Major Problem
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
DIABETES
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Hurricane Threats: Time to Batten Down the Hatches
Smog Standards Need Tightening, Activists Say
Short-Term Air Pollution Exposure May Damage DNA
EYE CARE, VISION
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
Antioxidant-Rich Diet May Protect Against Eye Disease
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
FITNESS
Maximize Your Run
Basketball Star Details His Struggle With Gout
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Retail Clinics Attracting Those Without Regular Doctors
Hidden Salt in Diet Haunts Many With Heart Failure
Soluble Fiber, But Not Bran, Soothes Irritable Bowel
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
Pool Chemicals Raise Kids Allergy, Asthma Risk
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Add your Article

Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Amyloid protein deposits in the brain play a role in disrupting the memory formation process long before a person shows symptoms of the memory impairment of Alzheimer's disease, a new study contends.

Previous research had suggested that clumps of amyloid protein, which damage neurons and are characteristic of Alzheimer's disease, begin appearing many years before Alzheimer's symptoms appear. But the link between the deposits and memory impairment had not been clearly demonstrated in humans.

In the new study, which appears in the July 30 issue of Neuron, U.S. researchers used medical imaging to examine the brains of older people who did not have significant memory impairment.

"Two recent advances in neuroimaging now allow us to explore the early, asymptomatic phase of [Alzheimer's disease], the ability to measure amyloid distribution in living humans and the identification of sensitive markers of brain dysfunction" in the disease, Dr. Reisa Sperling, of the Center for Alzheimer's Research and Treatment at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and lead author of the study, said in a news release from the journal's publisher.

The researchers found that a number of study participants had amyloid deposits and abnormal activity in areas of the brain believed to be involved in memory function.

The results could help in efforts to find ways to predict and treat cognitive decline in people at risk for Alzheimer's, the study authors noted.

"Longitudinal studies are certainly needed, but our findings are consistent with the premise that cognitively intact older individuals with amyloid pathology may already be in the early stages of [Alzheimer's disease]," Sperling said. "The combination of molecular and functional imaging techniques may prove useful in monitoring disease progression prior to significant clinical symptoms, as well as the response to amyloid-modifying therapeutic agents in subjects at risk for developing [Alzheimer's disease]."

SOURCES: Cell Press, news release, July 29, 2009