ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
Ginkgo No Shield Against Alzheimer's
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
CANCER
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
CAREGIVING
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Holistic Dentistry-My View
DIABETES
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
DIET, NUTRITION
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Asparagus May Ease Hangover
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
Bed Bugs Bring No Disease Danger
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
EYE CARE, VISION
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
FITNESS
Run for Your Life
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Health Gains From Lowered Smoking Rates in Jeopardy
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Countdown to Hair Loss
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Natural Relief for Painful Menstrual Cramps
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Quick Weight Loss May Be Best for Long-Term Success

When it comes to weight-loss patterns, the old adage proclaims that "slow and steady" wins the race, but recent research suggests otherwise.

A new study found that obese women who started out losing 1.5 pounds a week or more on average and kept it up lost more weight over time than women who lost more slowly. They also maintained the loss longer and were no more likely to put it back on than the slowest losers, the researchers added.

The results shouldn't be interpreted to mean that crash diets work, said study author Lisa Nackers, a doctoral student in clinical psychology at the University of Florida, Gainesville. Her report is published online in the International Journal of Behavioral Medicine.

Rather, she said, the quicker weight loss of the fast-losing group reflected their commitment to the program, Nackers said. "The fast group attended more sessions [to talk about weight loss], completed more food records and ate fewer calories than the slow group."

Fast loss is relative. For her study, Nackers said, "fast losers are those who lost at least a pound and a half a week."

The faster loss resulted from their active participation in the program, she said. "Those who make the behavior changes early do better in terms of weight loss and long term [in keeping it off]."

For the study, Nackers drew from data on 262 participants in an obesity treatment trial that included middle-aged women, average age 59, who were obese, with an average body-mass index (BMI) of 36.8 (30 and above is obese).

During the six-month intervention, they were encouraged to reduce calories enough to lose about a pound a week. The follow-up was another 12 months, for a total of 18 months.

When Nackers tracked the weight loss, she divided the women into three groups: 69 were in the fast group, losing about 1.5 pounds or more a week; 104 were in the moderate group, losing about a half pound to under 1.5 pounds a week, and 89 were in the slow group, losing less than a half pound weekly.

At six months, the fast group had lost an average of 29.7 pounds, the moderate group 19.6 and the slow group 11.2.

After 18 months, the fast group was 5.1 times more likely to achieve 10 percent weight loss -- a good goal for improving health -- than the slow group, and the moderate group was nearly three times as likely.

Nackers found no significant differences in weight regain among the three groups.

The results are no surprise to Alice Lichtenstein, director of the Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory at Tufts University in Boston. "It confirms that those individuals who are more adherent to the weight loss intervention lost more weight," she said.

"I think the point is, you want people to make changes in their diet and physical activity patterns so they start losing weight and maintain the loss," she said.

Nackers agreed, saying the study results should in no way encourage people to go on fad diets but to adopt healthier lifestyle behaviors.

SOURCES: Lisa Nackers, doctoral student, University of Florida, Gainesville; Alice H. Lichtenstein, D.Sc.; Stanley J. Gershoff Professor of Nutrition Science and Policy, Friedman School, Tufts University, director and senior scientist, Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory, USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston; May 5, 2010, International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, online Published on: May 14, 2010