ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
CANCER
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
CAREGIVING
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
DIABETES
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
Olive Oil May Be Key to Mediterranean Diet's Benefits
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications
Air Pollution Exposure May Slow Fetal Growth
Former Inmates at Increased Risk for High Blood Pressure
EYE CARE, VISION
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
FITNESS
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
Cherry-Enriched Diet Cut Heart Risks in Rats
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Combo Treatment Eases Wheezing in Babies
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Add your Article

Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Consuming too much of a common polyunsaturated fatty acid could be a contributing factor in an estimated 30 percent of all cases of ulcerative colitis, researchers say.

In a new study, participants who had the highest intake of linoleic acid had more than double the chance of developing the painful inflammation and blistering of the bowels as did those whose diet contained the least of the acid. The report is published online in Gut.

Red meat and some cooking oils and margarines are among the many dietary sources of linoleic acid.

However, the research also found that consuming lots of omega 3 fatty acids can cut the chance of developing ulcerative colitis by more than three quarters. Oily fish such as salmon and mackerel, flaxseed and certain dairy products are rich in omega 3, also known as docosahexanoic acid.

The European study, which looked at the dietary habits of more than 200,000 people in five countries, found that ulcerative colitis occurred about equally in men and women and at an average age of 60. The data analysis took into account other possible causes of the condition, including smoking, age, caloric intake and aspirin use.

The body converts linoleic acid to arachidonic acid, a component of the cell membranes in the bowel, and it then can turn into various chemicals that inflame tissue, according to information in a news release from the journal's publisher. People with ulcerative colitis have been found to have high levels of these chemicals in their bowel tissue.

Having ulcerative colitis, which is a chronic condition, puts a person at a higher risk of developing bowel cancer.

SOURCES: BMJ Specialist Journals, news release, July 22, 2009