ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Drinking Cuts Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
CANCER
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Herb May Counter Liver Damage From Chemo
CAREGIVING
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
With Age Comes Greater Risk of Hypothermia
Mom's Smoking May Lead to SIDS
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
DIABETES
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Vitamin D Vital for the Heart
Fruit Even Healthier Than Thought: Study Shows
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
EYE CARE, VISION
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
FITNESS
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Stressed and Exhausted: An Introduction to Adrenal Fatigue
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Combo Treatment Eases Wheezing in Babies
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Drink Away Dementia?
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Add your Article

Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes

THURSDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Consuming too much of a common polyunsaturated fatty acid could be a contributing factor in an estimated 30 percent of all cases of ulcerative colitis, researchers say.

In a new study, participants who had the highest intake of linoleic acid had more than double the chance of developing the painful inflammation and blistering of the bowels as did those whose diet contained the least of the acid. The report is published online in Gut.

Red meat and some cooking oils and margarines are among the many dietary sources of linoleic acid.

However, the research also found that consuming lots of omega 3 fatty acids can cut the chance of developing ulcerative colitis by more than three quarters. Oily fish such as salmon and mackerel, flaxseed and certain dairy products are rich in omega 3, also known as docosahexanoic acid.

The European study, which looked at the dietary habits of more than 200,000 people in five countries, found that ulcerative colitis occurred about equally in men and women and at an average age of 60. The data analysis took into account other possible causes of the condition, including smoking, age, caloric intake and aspirin use.

The body converts linoleic acid to arachidonic acid, a component of the cell membranes in the bowel, and it then can turn into various chemicals that inflame tissue, according to information in a news release from the journal's publisher. People with ulcerative colitis have been found to have high levels of these chemicals in their bowel tissue.

Having ulcerative colitis, which is a chronic condition, puts a person at a higher risk of developing bowel cancer.

SOURCES: BMJ Specialist Journals, news release, July 22, 2009