ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
Majority of College Students Report Backpack-Related Pain
Stem Cells Might Treat Tough Fractures
CANCER
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
CAREGIVING
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
Babies Born in High Pollen Months at Wheezing Risk
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Exposure to 9/11 Fumes Tied to Chronic Headaches
EYE CARE, VISION
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
FITNESS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
Be Healthy, Spend Less
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Man Dies of Brain Inflammation Caused by Deer Tick Virus
Vinegar Might Help Keep Off Pounds
Swine Flu Fatality Rate a 'Little Bit' Higher Than That of Seasonal Flu
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Countdown to Hair Loss
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
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Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes

(HealthDay News) -- New research provides further insight into how a health-boosting compound found in red grapes may help the body fend off type 2 diabetes.

But scientists have only seen the effect in mice who received injections in the brain, and no evidence has emerged that consuming red wine or other products made with grapes will alleviate the blood sugar disease.

The findings do tell scientists about how the compound known as resveratrol works on the brain, said senior study author Roberto Coppari.

If scientists know that the brain is a "major player," then drug companies working on related research "will focus on a drug that will penetrate the brain," said Coppari, an assistant professor of internal medicine at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.

Scientists have been excited about resveratrol, which is found in red grapes, red wine, pomegranates and some other foods, appears to extend the life spans of mice, even those fed a high-fat diet. Resveratrol appears to mimic the effects of severely restricting food intake, which helps a wide variety of animals live longer, Coppari said.

"You can take the spider, fish, and almost every animal in the planet, and give 70 percent of what the animal would normally eat, and you'll see beneficial effects," he said. "Of course, calorie restriction is very difficult to impose on people. You will feel hungry all the time."

In the new study, Coppari and colleagues looked at the effects of resveratrol on diabetes, not life span. Previous research has suggested that the compound helps the body fight off diabetes.

The researchers injected either resveratrol or a placebo into the brains of diet-induced and diabetic mice and watched to see what happened.

Over five weeks, insulin levels returned to half of normal levels in the mice that got the resveratrol injections, even though they were on high-fat diets. Researchers suspect resveratrol activated proteins in the brain called sirtuins.

The insulin levels in the other mice went up, apparently because of their diets.

So why not drink red wine to get the same effects? It won't work, Coppari said, since the amount of resveratrol in red wine is too low. Then there's the matter of the barrier between the bloodstream and the brain, which keeps things out of the brain.

"Clearly, administration of drugs to patients directly into the brain for chronic diseases is not feasible or realistic," said Lindsay Brown, of the University of Queensland's department of physiology and pharmacology in Australia.

"But this study may lead to the development of compounds that are more effective in crossing from the blood to the brain than is resveratrol," said Brown.

The study, which was supported by the American Heart Association, National Institutes of Health and American Diabetes Association, was published online in advance of its print publication in the December issue of the journal Endocrinology.

SOURCES: Roberto Coppari, Ph.D., assistant professor, internal medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas; Lindsay Brown, Ph.D., University of Queensland's department of physiology and pharmacology, Australia; December 2009 Endocrinology