ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
CANCER
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
CAREGIVING
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
Flu Strikes a Milder Blow This Season
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
DIABETES
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
Mediterranean Diet Enriched With Nuts Cuts Heart Risks
The Food Irradiation Story
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Radiation Exposure Linked to Aggressive Thyroid Cancers
Warmer-Than-Average Temperatures Raise Migraine Risk
Walkable Neighborhoods Keep the Pounds Off
EYE CARE, VISION
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
FITNESS
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
Stressed and Exhausted: An Introduction to Adrenal Fatigue
'Soda Tax' Wins Health Experts' Support
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
The Unmedicated Mind
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
SENIORS
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Add your Article

Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes

(HealthDay News) -- New research provides further insight into how a health-boosting compound found in red grapes may help the body fend off type 2 diabetes.

But scientists have only seen the effect in mice who received injections in the brain, and no evidence has emerged that consuming red wine or other products made with grapes will alleviate the blood sugar disease.

The findings do tell scientists about how the compound known as resveratrol works on the brain, said senior study author Roberto Coppari.

If scientists know that the brain is a "major player," then drug companies working on related research "will focus on a drug that will penetrate the brain," said Coppari, an assistant professor of internal medicine at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.

Scientists have been excited about resveratrol, which is found in red grapes, red wine, pomegranates and some other foods, appears to extend the life spans of mice, even those fed a high-fat diet. Resveratrol appears to mimic the effects of severely restricting food intake, which helps a wide variety of animals live longer, Coppari said.

"You can take the spider, fish, and almost every animal in the planet, and give 70 percent of what the animal would normally eat, and you'll see beneficial effects," he said. "Of course, calorie restriction is very difficult to impose on people. You will feel hungry all the time."

In the new study, Coppari and colleagues looked at the effects of resveratrol on diabetes, not life span. Previous research has suggested that the compound helps the body fight off diabetes.

The researchers injected either resveratrol or a placebo into the brains of diet-induced and diabetic mice and watched to see what happened.

Over five weeks, insulin levels returned to half of normal levels in the mice that got the resveratrol injections, even though they were on high-fat diets. Researchers suspect resveratrol activated proteins in the brain called sirtuins.

The insulin levels in the other mice went up, apparently because of their diets.

So why not drink red wine to get the same effects? It won't work, Coppari said, since the amount of resveratrol in red wine is too low. Then there's the matter of the barrier between the bloodstream and the brain, which keeps things out of the brain.

"Clearly, administration of drugs to patients directly into the brain for chronic diseases is not feasible or realistic," said Lindsay Brown, of the University of Queensland's department of physiology and pharmacology in Australia.

"But this study may lead to the development of compounds that are more effective in crossing from the blood to the brain than is resveratrol," said Brown.

The study, which was supported by the American Heart Association, National Institutes of Health and American Diabetes Association, was published online in advance of its print publication in the December issue of the journal Endocrinology.

SOURCES: Roberto Coppari, Ph.D., assistant professor, internal medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas; Lindsay Brown, Ph.D., University of Queensland's department of physiology and pharmacology, Australia; December 2009 Endocrinology