ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Living Near Major Road May Boost Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
Osteoporosis May Raise Risk for Vertigo
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
CANCER
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
CAREGIVING
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
Omega-3 Fatty Acid May Help 'Preemie' Girls' Brains
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
DIABETES
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Compound in Red Wine Fights Ravages of Age
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Greenhouse Gases Hazardous to Your Health
Pregnant Rural Women More at Risk
Improved Fungicides May Be Easier on Environment
EYE CARE, VISION
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
FITNESS
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Proven Strategies for Avoiding Colds and the Flu
Hidden Salt in Diet Haunts Many With Heart Failure
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
Combo Treatment Eases Wheezing in Babies
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
SENIORS
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
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Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes

(HealthDay News) -- New research provides further insight into how a health-boosting compound found in red grapes may help the body fend off type 2 diabetes.

But scientists have only seen the effect in mice who received injections in the brain, and no evidence has emerged that consuming red wine or other products made with grapes will alleviate the blood sugar disease.

The findings do tell scientists about how the compound known as resveratrol works on the brain, said senior study author Roberto Coppari.

If scientists know that the brain is a "major player," then drug companies working on related research "will focus on a drug that will penetrate the brain," said Coppari, an assistant professor of internal medicine at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.

Scientists have been excited about resveratrol, which is found in red grapes, red wine, pomegranates and some other foods, appears to extend the life spans of mice, even those fed a high-fat diet. Resveratrol appears to mimic the effects of severely restricting food intake, which helps a wide variety of animals live longer, Coppari said.

"You can take the spider, fish, and almost every animal in the planet, and give 70 percent of what the animal would normally eat, and you'll see beneficial effects," he said. "Of course, calorie restriction is very difficult to impose on people. You will feel hungry all the time."

In the new study, Coppari and colleagues looked at the effects of resveratrol on diabetes, not life span. Previous research has suggested that the compound helps the body fight off diabetes.

The researchers injected either resveratrol or a placebo into the brains of diet-induced and diabetic mice and watched to see what happened.

Over five weeks, insulin levels returned to half of normal levels in the mice that got the resveratrol injections, even though they were on high-fat diets. Researchers suspect resveratrol activated proteins in the brain called sirtuins.

The insulin levels in the other mice went up, apparently because of their diets.

So why not drink red wine to get the same effects? It won't work, Coppari said, since the amount of resveratrol in red wine is too low. Then there's the matter of the barrier between the bloodstream and the brain, which keeps things out of the brain.

"Clearly, administration of drugs to patients directly into the brain for chronic diseases is not feasible or realistic," said Lindsay Brown, of the University of Queensland's department of physiology and pharmacology in Australia.

"But this study may lead to the development of compounds that are more effective in crossing from the blood to the brain than is resveratrol," said Brown.

The study, which was supported by the American Heart Association, National Institutes of Health and American Diabetes Association, was published online in advance of its print publication in the December issue of the journal Endocrinology.

SOURCES: Roberto Coppari, Ph.D., assistant professor, internal medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas; Lindsay Brown, Ph.D., University of Queensland's department of physiology and pharmacology, Australia; December 2009 Endocrinology