ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Needling Away Your Headaches With Acupuncture
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
Selenium, Omega-3s May Stave Off Colorectal Cancer
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
DIABETES
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Mediterranean Diet Helps Protect Aging Brain
Vitamin B12 Key to Aging Brain
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Cleaning House May Be Risky for Women With Asthma
Ozone Pollution Taking Toll on American Lives
Exposure to 9/11 Fumes Tied to Chronic Headaches
EYE CARE, VISION
Decorative Halloween Eye Lenses May Pose Serious Risks
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
FITNESS
Bursts of Vigorous Activity Appear to Be a 'Stress-Buffer'
Weak Muscles May Cause 'Runner's Knee'
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Proven Strategies for Avoiding Colds and the Flu
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
When Clocks Change, Body May Need Time to Adjust
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development
Don't Leave Your Kids In The Car !
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Add your Article

Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes

(HealthDay News) -- New research provides further insight into how a health-boosting compound found in red grapes may help the body fend off type 2 diabetes.

But scientists have only seen the effect in mice who received injections in the brain, and no evidence has emerged that consuming red wine or other products made with grapes will alleviate the blood sugar disease.

The findings do tell scientists about how the compound known as resveratrol works on the brain, said senior study author Roberto Coppari.

If scientists know that the brain is a "major player," then drug companies working on related research "will focus on a drug that will penetrate the brain," said Coppari, an assistant professor of internal medicine at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.

Scientists have been excited about resveratrol, which is found in red grapes, red wine, pomegranates and some other foods, appears to extend the life spans of mice, even those fed a high-fat diet. Resveratrol appears to mimic the effects of severely restricting food intake, which helps a wide variety of animals live longer, Coppari said.

"You can take the spider, fish, and almost every animal in the planet, and give 70 percent of what the animal would normally eat, and you'll see beneficial effects," he said. "Of course, calorie restriction is very difficult to impose on people. You will feel hungry all the time."

In the new study, Coppari and colleagues looked at the effects of resveratrol on diabetes, not life span. Previous research has suggested that the compound helps the body fight off diabetes.

The researchers injected either resveratrol or a placebo into the brains of diet-induced and diabetic mice and watched to see what happened.

Over five weeks, insulin levels returned to half of normal levels in the mice that got the resveratrol injections, even though they were on high-fat diets. Researchers suspect resveratrol activated proteins in the brain called sirtuins.

The insulin levels in the other mice went up, apparently because of their diets.

So why not drink red wine to get the same effects? It won't work, Coppari said, since the amount of resveratrol in red wine is too low. Then there's the matter of the barrier between the bloodstream and the brain, which keeps things out of the brain.

"Clearly, administration of drugs to patients directly into the brain for chronic diseases is not feasible or realistic," said Lindsay Brown, of the University of Queensland's department of physiology and pharmacology in Australia.

"But this study may lead to the development of compounds that are more effective in crossing from the blood to the brain than is resveratrol," said Brown.

The study, which was supported by the American Heart Association, National Institutes of Health and American Diabetes Association, was published online in advance of its print publication in the December issue of the journal Endocrinology.

SOURCES: Roberto Coppari, Ph.D., assistant professor, internal medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas; Lindsay Brown, Ph.D., University of Queensland's department of physiology and pharmacology, Australia; December 2009 Endocrinology