ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Fall Sports Peak Time for Lower Leg Damage
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
CANCER
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
CAREGIVING
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
Recession Scrambling Health Spending in U.S.
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
DIABETES
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
DIET, NUTRITION
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
Eating Less May Slow Aging Process
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Sunken, Unexploded Bombs Pose Cancer Risk
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
Global Warming Biggest Health Threat of 21st Century, Experts Say
EYE CARE, VISION
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
FITNESS
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Adults Need To Get Thier Food Facts Straight
When Clocks Change, Body May Need Time to Adjust
Can a Bad Boss Make You Sick?
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Add your Article

Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits

(HealthDay News) -- Practicing yoga regularly may help your eating habits so you can maintain a healthier weight, a new study says.

Researchers at the Seattle-based Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center reported a link between yoga practitioners and "mindful eaters," people who were better aware of their feelings of hunger and fullness and why they ate. These mindful eaters, as opposed to those who ate regardless of hunger or to soothe anxiety or depression, tended to be less likely to be obese, the study found. Results are published in the August issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

"Mindful eating is a skill that augments the usual approaches to weight loss, such as dieting, counting calories and limiting portion sizes," study leader Alan Kristal, associate head of the Cancer Prevention Program at the Hutchinson Center, said in a news release from the center. "Adding yoga practice to a standard weight-loss program may make it more effective."

The study was based on analysis of a questionnaire about mindful eating habits (such as being distracted by other things while eating or responding to emotional situations with food) and other health- and exercise-related factors that was completed by more than 300 people at Seattle-area yoga, fitness and weight-loss facilities. Though the average weight of the participants was within normal ranges, people who practiced yoga tended to have a noticeably lower body mass index than those who didn't, with the average being 23.1 versus 25.8, respectively.

The findings support earlier research by Kristal that found that regular yoga helped middle-age people gain less weight over a 10-year period than non-yoga practitioners, regardless of other physical activity and eating patterns.

Although about half of the new study's participants also engaged in at least 90 minutes of walking or moderate and strenuous exercise, only regular yoga class participation was linked to mindful eating.

Kristal, himself a yoga enthusiast, said that yoga challenges people to focus and accept their surroundings without judgment, key teachings that might encourage better discipline about eating. "This ability to be calm and observant during physical discomfort teaches how to maintain calm in other challenging situations, such as not eating more even when the food tastes good and not eating when you're not hungry," he said.

Kristal hopes the questionnaire his team developed could have clinical and research applications that would help people understand their eating habits and promote better ones.

SOURCES: Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, news release, August 2009 Published on: August 27, 2009