ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Winter Is Tough on Feet
Many Americans Fall Short on Their Vitamin D
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
CANCER
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
CAREGIVING
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Smog Tougher on the Obese
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
Vinegar Might Help Keep Off Pounds
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Even in 'Last Supper,' Portion Sizes Have Grown
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Rainy Areas in U.S. Show Higher Autism Rates
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
EYE CARE, VISION
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
FITNESS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Maximize Your Run
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Quick Orthopedic Repair Can Save Young Shoulders
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
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Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength

(HealthDay News) -- Taking time to appreciate the positive things that happen in your daily life can help boost your overall satisfaction and build resilience to cope with tough times, study findings show.

In a recent study, 86 volunteers provided daily "emotion reports" over a one-month period, instead of answering general questions such as how much joy they felt over the last few months.

"Getting those daily reports helped us gather more accurate recollections of feelings and allowed us to capture emotional ups and downs," study author Barbara Fredrickson, a professor of psychology in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, said in a news release.

"This study shows that if happiness is something you want out of life, then focusing daily on the small moments and cultivating positive emotions is the way to go," she said. "Those small moments let positive emotions blossom, and that helps you become more open. That openness then helps us build resources that can help us rebound better from adversity and stress, ward off depression and continue to grow."

Fredrickson added that "the levels of positive emotions that produced good benefits weren't extreme. Participants with average and stable levels of positive emotions still showed growth in resilience even when their days included negative emotions."

She emphasized the need to focus on small positive moments, or "micro-moments," that can produce good feelings.

"A lot of times we get so wrapped up in thinking about the future and the past that we are blind to the goodness we are steeped in already, whether it's the beauty outside the window or the kind things that people are doing for you," Fredrickson said. "The better approach is to be open and flexible, to be appreciative of whatever good you do find in your daily circumstances, rather than focusing on bigger questions."

The study was published in the June issue of the journal Emotion.

SOURCES: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, news release, July 8, 2009 Published on: July 10, 2009