ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
Get in Step With Summer Foot Care
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
CANCER
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
CAREGIVING
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
Caregiving May Lengthen Life
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
DIET, NUTRITION
Soluble Fiber, But Not Bran, Soothes Irritable Bowel
Eating Vegan or Raw-Vegan at Regular Restaurants
Is Your Refrigerator Getting Enough Attention For Your Raw Food Success?
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Old-Growth Forests Dying Off in U.S. West
Database Helps Assess Your Breast Cancer Risk
Air Pollution Raises Risk of Heart Disease, Death
EYE CARE, VISION
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
Bursts of Vigorous Activity Appear to Be a 'Stress-Buffer'
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Fliers Can Keep Blood Clots at Bay
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Hoping for a Happy Family Holiday? Here's How
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Treat Kids to a Safe Halloween
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Natural Therapies for Menopause
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Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength

(HealthDay News) -- Taking time to appreciate the positive things that happen in your daily life can help boost your overall satisfaction and build resilience to cope with tough times, study findings show.

In a recent study, 86 volunteers provided daily "emotion reports" over a one-month period, instead of answering general questions such as how much joy they felt over the last few months.

"Getting those daily reports helped us gather more accurate recollections of feelings and allowed us to capture emotional ups and downs," study author Barbara Fredrickson, a professor of psychology in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, said in a news release.

"This study shows that if happiness is something you want out of life, then focusing daily on the small moments and cultivating positive emotions is the way to go," she said. "Those small moments let positive emotions blossom, and that helps you become more open. That openness then helps us build resources that can help us rebound better from adversity and stress, ward off depression and continue to grow."

Fredrickson added that "the levels of positive emotions that produced good benefits weren't extreme. Participants with average and stable levels of positive emotions still showed growth in resilience even when their days included negative emotions."

She emphasized the need to focus on small positive moments, or "micro-moments," that can produce good feelings.

"A lot of times we get so wrapped up in thinking about the future and the past that we are blind to the goodness we are steeped in already, whether it's the beauty outside the window or the kind things that people are doing for you," Fredrickson said. "The better approach is to be open and flexible, to be appreciative of whatever good you do find in your daily circumstances, rather than focusing on bigger questions."

The study was published in the June issue of the journal Emotion.

SOURCES: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, news release, July 8, 2009 Published on: July 10, 2009