ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
New Clues to How Fish Oils Help Arthritis Patients
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
Pain More a Cause of Arthritis Than a Symptom
CANCER
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
Selenium, Omega-3s May Stave Off Colorectal Cancer
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
CAREGIVING
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
DIABETES
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
The Best Diet? That Depends on You
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Functional Foods Uncovered
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Air Pollution Raises Risk of Heart Disease, Death
Chemical in Plastics May Cause Fertility Problems
Disinfectants Can Boost Bacteria's Resistance to Treatment
EYE CARE, VISION
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Drink Away Dementia?
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
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Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength

(HealthDay News) -- Taking time to appreciate the positive things that happen in your daily life can help boost your overall satisfaction and build resilience to cope with tough times, study findings show.

In a recent study, 86 volunteers provided daily "emotion reports" over a one-month period, instead of answering general questions such as how much joy they felt over the last few months.

"Getting those daily reports helped us gather more accurate recollections of feelings and allowed us to capture emotional ups and downs," study author Barbara Fredrickson, a professor of psychology in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, said in a news release.

"This study shows that if happiness is something you want out of life, then focusing daily on the small moments and cultivating positive emotions is the way to go," she said. "Those small moments let positive emotions blossom, and that helps you become more open. That openness then helps us build resources that can help us rebound better from adversity and stress, ward off depression and continue to grow."

Fredrickson added that "the levels of positive emotions that produced good benefits weren't extreme. Participants with average and stable levels of positive emotions still showed growth in resilience even when their days included negative emotions."

She emphasized the need to focus on small positive moments, or "micro-moments," that can produce good feelings.

"A lot of times we get so wrapped up in thinking about the future and the past that we are blind to the goodness we are steeped in already, whether it's the beauty outside the window or the kind things that people are doing for you," Fredrickson said. "The better approach is to be open and flexible, to be appreciative of whatever good you do find in your daily circumstances, rather than focusing on bigger questions."

The study was published in the June issue of the journal Emotion.

SOURCES: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, news release, July 8, 2009 Published on: July 10, 2009