ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Ginkgo No Shield Against Alzheimer's
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Extra Pounds in Mid-Life Affect Later Mobility
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
CANCER
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
Immune Therapy May Aid Kids With Neuroblastoma
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Timing May Matter in Organ Donation Decisions
Omega-3 Fatty Acid May Help 'Preemie' Girls' Brains
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
DIABETES
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
DIET, NUTRITION
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Antioxidants Abound in Cereals, Popcorn, Whole-Grain Snacks
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Preparing for a Chlorine Gas Disaster
Air Pollution Exposure May Slow Fetal Growth
1976 Italian Dioxin Release Damaged Babies' Thyroids
EYE CARE, VISION
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
FITNESS
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Add your Article

Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength

(HealthDay News) -- Taking time to appreciate the positive things that happen in your daily life can help boost your overall satisfaction and build resilience to cope with tough times, study findings show.

In a recent study, 86 volunteers provided daily "emotion reports" over a one-month period, instead of answering general questions such as how much joy they felt over the last few months.

"Getting those daily reports helped us gather more accurate recollections of feelings and allowed us to capture emotional ups and downs," study author Barbara Fredrickson, a professor of psychology in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, said in a news release.

"This study shows that if happiness is something you want out of life, then focusing daily on the small moments and cultivating positive emotions is the way to go," she said. "Those small moments let positive emotions blossom, and that helps you become more open. That openness then helps us build resources that can help us rebound better from adversity and stress, ward off depression and continue to grow."

Fredrickson added that "the levels of positive emotions that produced good benefits weren't extreme. Participants with average and stable levels of positive emotions still showed growth in resilience even when their days included negative emotions."

She emphasized the need to focus on small positive moments, or "micro-moments," that can produce good feelings.

"A lot of times we get so wrapped up in thinking about the future and the past that we are blind to the goodness we are steeped in already, whether it's the beauty outside the window or the kind things that people are doing for you," Fredrickson said. "The better approach is to be open and flexible, to be appreciative of whatever good you do find in your daily circumstances, rather than focusing on bigger questions."

The study was published in the June issue of the journal Emotion.

SOURCES: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, news release, July 8, 2009 Published on: July 10, 2009