ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
Drinking Cuts Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
CANCER
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Children's Bath Products Contain Contaminants
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
3 Steps Might Help Stop MRSA's Spread
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating More Soy May Be Good For Your Lung Function
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
Exhaust From Railroad Diesel Linked to Lung Ailments
Golf Course Insecticides Pose Little Danger to Players
EYE CARE, VISION
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
FITNESS
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Almost Two-Thirds of Americans Meet Exercise Guidelines
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Spread of Swine Flu in Japan Could Raise WHO Alert to Highest Level
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Psychiatric Drugs Might Raise Cardiac Death Risk
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Optimism May Boost Immune System
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
SENIORS
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
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Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength

(HealthDay News) -- Taking time to appreciate the positive things that happen in your daily life can help boost your overall satisfaction and build resilience to cope with tough times, study findings show.

In a recent study, 86 volunteers provided daily "emotion reports" over a one-month period, instead of answering general questions such as how much joy they felt over the last few months.

"Getting those daily reports helped us gather more accurate recollections of feelings and allowed us to capture emotional ups and downs," study author Barbara Fredrickson, a professor of psychology in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, said in a news release.

"This study shows that if happiness is something you want out of life, then focusing daily on the small moments and cultivating positive emotions is the way to go," she said. "Those small moments let positive emotions blossom, and that helps you become more open. That openness then helps us build resources that can help us rebound better from adversity and stress, ward off depression and continue to grow."

Fredrickson added that "the levels of positive emotions that produced good benefits weren't extreme. Participants with average and stable levels of positive emotions still showed growth in resilience even when their days included negative emotions."

She emphasized the need to focus on small positive moments, or "micro-moments," that can produce good feelings.

"A lot of times we get so wrapped up in thinking about the future and the past that we are blind to the goodness we are steeped in already, whether it's the beauty outside the window or the kind things that people are doing for you," Fredrickson said. "The better approach is to be open and flexible, to be appreciative of whatever good you do find in your daily circumstances, rather than focusing on bigger questions."

The study was published in the June issue of the journal Emotion.

SOURCES: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, news release, July 8, 2009 Published on: July 10, 2009